[PDF / Epub] ☉ The Honourable Schoolboy Author John le Carré – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk

The Honourable Schoolboy As The Fall Of Saigon Looms, Master Spy George Smiley Must Outmaneuver His Soviet Counterpart On A Battlefield That Neither Can Afford To Lose The Mole Has Been Eliminated, But The Damage Wrought Has Brought The British Secret Service To Its Knees Given Charge Of The Gravely Compromised Circus, George Smiley Embarks On A Campaign To Uncover What Moscow Centre Most Wants To Hide When The Trail Goes Cold At A Hong Kong Gold Seam, Smiley Dispatches Gerald Westerby To Shake The Money Tree A Part Time Operative With Cover As A Philandering Journalist, Westerby Insinuates Himself Into A War Torn World Where Allegiances And Lives Are Bought And Sold Brilliantly Plotted And Morally Complex, The Honourable Schoolboy, Is The Second Installment Of John Le Carr S Renowned Karla Trilogy, And A Riveting Portrayal Of Post Colonial Espionage.


10 thoughts on “The Honourable Schoolboy

  1. says:

    What a man thinks is his own business What matters is what he does This quote seems fairly elementary in substance, and I can t help thinking how much this seems to reflect the basic expectation of the intelligence agents in this novel A man or woman is given a set of orders, and those orders should be followed through with no exception Associations with other human beings and emotions should not come into the equation They do not belong in the world of espionage Stopping to question certain morals is a major blunder A bit of a fairy tale, I think, because when you insert a human being into the lives of others, not everything is black and white That gray area in between can be quite confounding and rather perilous at times The Honourable Schoolboy is the second book in John le Carr s Karla trilogy After rooting out a Russian mole in the British intelligence agency, George Smiley is trying to pull his team back together and pick up the pieces of a broken service A picture of Karla, his archenemy in the Russian service, hangs in his office serving as ...


  2. says:

    In the review I wrote for Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy I mentioned that it took me a while to accustom myself to the spy jargon as well as many of the British idioms It gave me a very strange feeling to start reading this episode 6 in the George Smiley series and discover 1 the British idioms are offset by the fact that the Circus centre of espionage in London is balanced, and often explained by the Cousins their American counterparts, based in Langley, Virginia and 2 the definitions of the spy terms are woven seamlessly into the narrative itself So we not only know who the Circus and the Cousins are, but we also know what Housekeeping is, what the Nursery is, and the many other phrases for departments within the British secret service This novel takes place largely in China Hong Kong, for the most part However, it also takes us to other parts of Asia and there are a few side trips to London where George Smiley has been doing everything possible to pull together a stronger team after exposing the mole Russia had planted high in the ranks of the Circus See Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy for that story While he is busy ensuring all bugs are cleaned out and missing records are cobbled together out of the pieces that remain, an entire Chinese development is underway.Coordinating the new development as well as wrestling some order and security back into being is a hug...


  3. says:

    Popular opinion has it that this is the weakest of the three Karla novels I thought it was a masterpiece, and a ambitious novel than Tinker, Tailor.It is very different from the last book suddenly there is this unexpectedly huge scope of Southeast Asia to go alongside the muted meetings in grey London office rooms I can well understand how some readers might have felt it was two books jammed together, but for me the contrast worked perfectly and I was riveted by how brilliantly Le Carr unfurls the story The writing here is simply incredible I can t think of another writer who could have me on the edge of my seat with a twenty page description of an interdepartmental meeting, but somehow that s what we get here Here s the halfway point of the meeting, after several pages of close, detailed description just admire how easily he suddenly slips into this spare, witty style Lunch, Martindale announced without much optimism They ate it upstairs, glumly, off plastic catering trays delivered by van The partitions were too low and Guillam s custard flowed into his meat.The Southeast Asia sections are wonderfully accomplished We have thumbnail sketches of the Laotian capital, the Cambodian Civil War, rich descriptions of pre handover Hong Kong Jerry Westerby, the hack reporter who doubles as an occasional stringer for British Intelligence, is a character who will ring true to anyone who s worked in journalism As a reporter myself, I ve never yet read a better descript...


  4. says:

    I m a longtime reader of the espionage genre beginning as just a lad and although I massively enjoyed all of John LeCarre s earlier works and particularly his George Smiley series I must call out The Honourable Schoolboy for especial recognition This penultimate work of that series is really the triumph of LeCarre s career the point at which he reached the full breadth and scope of his powers Afterwards although he enjoyed further achievements I suggest that he never again eclipses this colossal, supreme effort of authorship I name it the single greatest espionage novel ever penned Pound for pound in any one on one matchup versus any other stand alone title it has no peer Read on if you wish to learn why.First it is a lengthy book much longer than most others in the genre and written with rich, subtle prose Prose honed by two decades of LeCarre s experience with the novel form Every chapter is liquid, supple, silky His best writing in a long time Splendidly restrained, tempered, calm, and observant throughout It s a sustained exercise in pacing and suspense which exists nowhere else in the genre, handled as finely.Second just as one would expect, there s an intricate and me...


  5. says:

    , Le Carre, noir , .


  6. says:

    I and the public knowWhat all schoolchildren learn,Those to whom evil is doneDo evil in return W.H AudenWhat if you devoted your entire life to something because you thought it was the right thing, the good thing, the moral thing, and then you ended your life wondering if you had been completely wrong It happens to a lot of people, particularly because things shift on us as the years go by and change in ways we do not notice or acknowledge, and because with age comes wisdom, or if not wisdom, perhaps just clearer vision.MacArthur famously said, Old Soldiers never die, they just fade away Perhaps the same can be said of old spies, cold wars, and people who live on the fringe of society, just clambering for survival And, if they have not died, but are only faded, can they be restored These were some of the thoughts I had while reading this novel, because John le Carre is one of those who sees the underbelly of life, and the betrayals it contains, and does not flinch The time is 1974 75, Vietnam is falling from the hands of the Americans, Southeast Asia is a hotbed of activity, legal and illegal, the British still exercise control of a sort over Hong Kong, and ...


  7. says:

    I and the public knowWhat all schoolchildren learn,Those to whom evil is doneDo evil in return. W.H Auden Yet it s not for want of future that I m here, he thought It s for want of a present John le Carr , The Honourable SchoolboyWell sport, this was a messy, sometimes uneven AND occasionally a plodding novel but I absolutely loved every single word of it This is the second book of le Carr s Karla trilogy Perhaps, the greatest spy trilogy ever While people focus on the first book, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy, I pe...


  8. says:

    One of the few bright spots is how the author wrote the 1970s colonized Hong Kong, I also enjoy how the author described the international spy network and how those spies work, but all the good things I have to say...


  9. says:

    Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is a tough act to follow, but I must admit I was expecting At first, I thought that s exactly what I was getting but then the mind numbing second third happened and I was lost in a way I never was in Tinker Tailor I still don t have a clear understanding of what happened in the book or with my interest in it.All I know is that I got sick of reading about Jerry I got sick of Guillam s overdone fawning I got sick of the female characters including Connie ...


  10. says:

    John le Carr calls Hong Kong the world capital of espionage of the seventies There on the invisible battlefields the unseen combats are being fought But the invisibility doesn t make the m l es less cruel Clandestinity just makes spy battles much psychologically complex A redhead, which was half way to whoredom for a start Not enough breast to nurse a rabbit, and worst of all a fierce eye for arithmetic They said he found her in the town whore again From the first day, she had not let him out of her sight Clung to him like a child Ate with him, and sulked drank with him, and sulked shopped with him, picking up the language like a thief, till they became a minor local sight together, the English giant and his sulking wraith whore, trailing down the hill with their rush basket the schoolboy, in his tattered shorts, grinning at everyone, and the scowling orphan, in her whore s sackcloth with nothing underneath, so that though she was plain as a scorpion the men stared after her to see her hard haunches rock through the fabric She walked with all her fingers locked round his arm and her cheek against his shoulder, and she only let go of him t...


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