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10 thoughts on “The Oxford Illustrated History of Ireland

  1. Margaret Harris Margaret Harris says:

    This book is a revisionist history of Ireland, published in 1989 as a set of essays by six academic professors I found it condescending throughout I read it to the end, hoping to find at least one of the contributors who didn t simplistically describe history as clashes of classes But, alas, from the year 77 to the date this history ended in about 1987, the people of Ireland are portrayed as either tribal class, lordship class, vassal class, magnate class, rural class, noble class, peasan This book is a revisionist history of Ireland, published in 1989 as a set of essays by six academic professors I found it condescending throughout I read it to the end, hoping to find at least one of the contributors who didn t simplistically describe history as clashes of classes But, alas, from the year 77 to the date this history ended in about 1987, the people of Ireland are portrayed as either tribal class, lordship class, vassal class, magnate class, rural class, noble class, peasant class, ascendancy class, tenant class, landholding class, rebels, militants, degenerates, priests, bards, high society, low society, and of course the ultimate Marxian assignments bourgeoisie and proletariat Herr Marx himself is cited for his observations about the hierarchy of status among populations, which does at least suggest a source for these professors fixation upon categorizing everyone according to some social status Besides general group classifications, each historical individual cited from mythology through royal, political, literary, religious, military, or rebellious fields is placed into one class or another, but if any is said to have moved from a birth class to another class during a lifetime, he or she is besmirched for some sort of betrayal Every phase of the 2000 year old history of Ireland is demeaned as it is summarized by these authors, and the conclusion on the final page seems to be that the Irish are hopelessly inept and unlikely to ever be able to govern themselves should they ultimately succeed in their recurring attempts to extricate themselves from rule by foreign invaders over the centuries.How ironic that since 1989, the Irish have proved these writers to be wildly mistaken I will have to find another book to teach me the history of the past 27 years, so that I will understand how a tourist to Ireland today finds such a clean, orderly, and exquisitely beautiful land filled with kind, generous, industrious, prosperous, gracious, and welcoming native citizens How, indeed, did such a degenerate culture produce such vast numbers of musicians, writers, craftsmen, corporate executives, politicians, professional golfers, small business operators, large business managers, agricultural producers, and every other skilled occupation one might name, both at home and throughout the world Whatever accuracy is related about Irish history in this book is overridden by a tone of unnecessary snobbery that spoils the telling


  2. May Ling May Ling says:

    It s great if you want an overview A little dry for what it is.I gave it three stars because if you want a quick overview it will do the trick Otherwise, I think you might want a longer form of the stories of Ireland This really does cover from Vikings to the British, to Henry VIII and to the present day I can t complain I get that much out of it But if you actually go to Ireland, well, that is a place that knows how to make a short story long As such, it was kind of striking how this mad It s great if you want an overview A little dry for what it is.I gave it three stars because if you want a quick overview it will do the trick Otherwise, I think you might want a longer form of the stories of Ireland This really does cover from Vikings to the British, to Henry VIII and to the present day I can t complain I get that much out of it But if you actually go to Ireland, well, that is a place that knows how to make a short story long As such, it was kind of striking how this made a long story short Depends what you want


  3. Bruce Bruce says:

    The collaborative effort of six scholars, this history covers Ireland s history from the prehistoric period to 1989, when the book was published It has many illustrations but is farthan simply a picture book The differences in style among the authors is a bit disconcerting, and for the years before 1500 the reader can become bewildered by the continually shifting political loyalties among huge number of minor Gaelic leaders, but beginning with the opening of the sixteen century, patter The collaborative effort of six scholars, this history covers Ireland s history from the prehistoric period to 1989, when the book was published It has many illustrations but is farthan simply a picture book The differences in style among the authors is a bit disconcerting, and for the years before 1500 the reader can become bewildered by the continually shifting political loyalties among huge number of minor Gaelic leaders, but beginning with the opening of the sixteen century, patterns begin to emerge that are easier to follow The primary constant theme determining social and political change is the continual Irish using the term to include not only the Gaelic population but also the Old English who had been both resident and dominant in Ireland for some time resistance to English government authority, involvement that waxed and waned but was always seen as exploitative and coercive I found the final chapter the most interesting, although it would have made little sense without those that came before It contained a discussion of the course of Irish literature, comparing and contrasting Gaelic Irish writings with English Irish works and exploring the mutual interactions and evolution of both There was also a discussion of the extent to which authors tailored their writings to their intended audiences, audiences that changeed progressively over time this tailoring often involved the creation and perpetuation of types and stereotypes that often persist to the present day Authors with whom I have had little familiarity have moved onto my to read list


  4. Gearóid O& Gearóid O& says:

    This book is less an academic study of Irish history anda synopsis of the authors prejudices which he hides behind an overly verbose account of Irish history History is supposed to be impartial and historians are, or were when I studied history supposed to abide by or at least attempt to abide by such an ideal However Mr Foster fails in this regard quite spectacularly.How he can describe the death of Terence McSweeny on hunger strike as a droll apotheosis is beyond me The snobbish This book is less an academic study of Irish history anda synopsis of the authors prejudices which he hides behind an overly verbose account of Irish history History is supposed to be impartial and historians are, or were when I studied history supposed to abide by or at least attempt to abide by such an ideal However Mr Foster fails in this regard quite spectacularly.How he can describe the death of Terence McSweeny on hunger strike as a droll apotheosis is beyond me The snobbish Anglo Irish tone continues throughout and permeates the entire book turning what could have been an excellent history book into a strange medley of Anglo Irish contempt for uncivilised peasants and an over use of the English language Mr Foster never uses a short word where he can squeeze a long one in Perhaps he is trying to confuse the natives In this at least he succeeds.In short a well written exercise in a thoroughly bias Anglo centric viewpoint on Irish history.As a work of fiction though, it s a great read The one star is for the pictures


  5. Uptownbookwormnyc Uptownbookwormnyc says:

    The second star is for the pictures.


  6. Sean Lynch Sean Lynch says:

    A long, sweeping ride through the history of Ireland starting in the prehistoric era and passing the barbarian tribes and kingships of the Middle Ages, the Norman Invasion, the Ascendancy, and finally ending up in modern day Ireland, the Oxford History of Ireland covers a lot of ground Unfortunately, much of the writing is snoozy and the big, important arcs of history are camouflaged in a landscape rife with weeds, an overwhelming surplus of facts of minor importance to the reader not writing a A long, sweeping ride through the history of Ireland starting in the prehistoric era and passing the barbarian tribes and kingships of the Middle Ages, the Norman Invasion, the Ascendancy, and finally ending up in modern day Ireland, the Oxford History of Ireland covers a lot of ground Unfortunately, much of the writing is snoozy and the big, important arcs of history are camouflaged in a landscape rife with weeds, an overwhelming surplus of facts of minor importance to the reader not writing a research paper The beautiful contours of the Emerald Isle are hard to see from the dense thicket of vegetation you re confronted with If you re looking for Irish history in broad strokes, as I was, this is probably not the best place to start I felt like I was looking at a Monet under a magnifying glass when all I wanted was to back up a few feet and take in the whole thing This sounds like a mostly negative review, so why did I give this work 5 stars Because the last chapter is dazzling As a collaboration of six scholars, the book doesn t soar until Declan Kiberd takes the helm in the final chapter, Irish Literature and Irish History Unlike the dry, academic writing of the preceding chapters not befitting the land of Yeats and Joyce Kiberd s essay stands apart as he contextualizes the works of the great Irish writers, exploring the unique mixture of nationalism, ancient lore, pride, and colonial oppression that spawned the Irish Renaissance And he ends with a sad assessment of the current state of art in Ireland and the failure of modern writers to do justice to the mythical Cathleen ni Houlihan He laments a once fierce literary tradition that is now shy of politics and has failed to rise to the occasion during the hunger strikes of the 1980s, or the torture of innocent suspects in Irish and British gaols, or divorce and abortion referenda of the mid 80s Kiberd partially blames the state s coziness with artists tax exemptions, guaranteed minimum income for writing that eschews examining social conditions in favor of addressing social problems in the context of the pathology of man, arguing that artists and intellectuals don t wish to bite the political hand that feeds or might feed them He exalts the meaningful role that writers like O Casey and Synge, whose plays caused riots, had in Irish culture and soberly observes, Not long ago, artists and intellectuals were oppressed by the Irish people but now, there is a distinct possibility that the Irish people are oppressed in the sense of misrepresented or ignored by the intellectuals I want to go on quoting the whole last few pages, but instead I ll just highly recommend you go out and buy the book, if only for the last chapter


  7. James Violand James Violand says:

    This book accomplishes what had been assumed to be impossible making the colorful history of the Irish people irrelevant and boring Perhaps it represents the relatively new perspective of history facts unhindered by persons or events It s like a poor travelogue Interstate 9 has been constructed based upon the typical Roman technique but modified by newer materials such as macadam Travel has becomecomfortable and hence enjoyable What about the Rockies The vast grasslands of Montan This book accomplishes what had been assumed to be impossible making the colorful history of the Irish people irrelevant and boring Perhaps it represents the relatively new perspective of history facts unhindered by persons or events It s like a poor travelogue Interstate 9 has been constructed based upon the typical Roman technique but modified by newer materials such as macadam Travel has becomecomfortable and hence enjoyable What about the Rockies The vast grasslands of Montana Prairie dogs Bison Lewis Clark Seattle The Columbia River You get the point.It seems to me that the new historian writes for himself His intent is not to educate but to impress the reader with his depth of knowledge, synthesizing data as proofs for an innovative view Avoid this book


  8. Caitlin Caitlin says:

    A thorough and enlightening explanation of the major episodes in Irish history I think this book would probably be best if combined with other reading material, say, in a college course Not having a knowledgable source available to ask my questions of, I had to resort to googling things I was unfamiliar with A glossary would have been useful Overall, comprehensive and worth reading if you want to invest the time and energy into learning about Irish history.


  9. Aya Aya says:

    somewhere in the first 50 pages Foster refers to mercenaries as ubiquitous but actually we don t see many of them Cromwell is also dismissed rather quickly.At the same time, points of this history are very detailed the early period especially so but it still manages to get at some of the greater arcs of Irish history


  10. Mark Fallon Mark Fallon says:

    A dry, scholarly text that corrects many of the myths of Irish history, while destroying any romance as well The final chapter by D Kiberd is superfluous The book requires a knowledge of the histories of both Ireland and England, as many of the major acts are only given a line or a paragraph.


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The Oxford Illustrated History of Ireland ❄ [EPUB] ✼ The Oxford Illustrated History of Ireland By R.F. Foster ➝ – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Few countries in the world have such a compelling, individual, and stirring history as Ireland This new volume, the latest in the widely acclaimed Oxford Illustrated Histories series, offers the most Few countries in the world have Illustrated History PDF/EPUB » such a compelling, individual, and stirring history as Ireland This new volume, the latest in the widely acclaimed Oxford Illustrated Histories series, offers the most authoritative account of Irish history yet published for the general reader Written by an expert team of scholars all of whom are native to Ireland this richly illustrated work takes us from the very earliest prehistoric communities and first Christian settlements, through centuries of turbulent change and creativity, to the present day Unlike The Oxford PDF \ earlier one volume histories, which have tended toward oversimplification, this book emphasizes the paradoxes and ambiguities of Irish history, presenting a much realistic picture Why, for instance, are there such intense variations in agriculture, prosperity, and political affiliation in an island that compasses such a small area And why do Victorian norms prevail in certain areas of th century Irish life In each chapter, the author marks new paths, redefining the preoccupations of the Irish and casting a cold eye on their ruling pieties Overall Oxford Illustrated History eBook ↠ unifying themes do, of course, emerge and provide the familiar ground of Irish historiography the shifting patterns of settlement and colonization, the recurrent religious strife, the establishment of new political entities The predominance of language in Irish life has led to the creation of a literature that is, in a way, a record of Irish history A special feature of this book is a chapter that explores the interaction of Irish history and literature, what some have called a bloody crossroads The conflicts, settlements, discontinuities, and unities of Irish history are illustrated with a broad range of visuals covering the landscape, artefacts, architecture, and an enormous variety of contemporary material There are overphotographs, includingfull color plates, and the volume is completed with reference material, maps, a chronology, lists of further reading, and a full index Wide ranging, challenging, and highly readable, this vivid view of Irish history will instruct and entertain students, scholars, and general readers alike.

    Download Book Best Sellers in PDF format the present day Unlike The Oxford PDF \ earlier one volume histories, which have tended toward oversimplification, this book emphasizes the paradoxes and ambiguities of Irish history, presenting a much realistic picture Why, for instance, are there such intense variations in agriculture, prosperity, and political affiliation in an island that compasses such a small area And why do Victorian norms prevail in certain areas of th century Irish life In each chapter, the author marks new paths, redefining the preoccupations of the Irish and casting a cold eye on their ruling pieties Overall Oxford Illustrated History eBook ↠ unifying themes do, of course, emerge and provide the familiar ground of Irish historiography the shifting patterns of settlement and colonization, the recurrent religious strife, the establishment of new political entities The predominance of language in Irish life has led to the creation of a literature that is, in a way, a record of Irish history A special feature of this book is a chapter that explores the interaction of Irish history and literature, what some have called a bloody crossroads The conflicts, settlements, discontinuities, and unities of Irish history are illustrated with a broad range of visuals covering the landscape, artefacts, architecture, and an enormous variety of contemporary material There are overphotographs, includingfull color plates, and the volume is completed with reference material, maps, a chronology, lists of further reading, and a full index Wide ranging, challenging, and highly readable, this vivid view of Irish history will instruct and entertain students, scholars, and general readers alike."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 398 pages
  • The Oxford Illustrated History of Ireland
  • R.F. Foster
  • English
  • 22 June 2019
  • 0198229704

About the Author: R.F. Foster

Robert Fitzroy Foster, PhD, FBA, FRHistS, Illustrated History PDF/EPUB » FRSL.