Ghost Milk: Calling Time on the Grand Project PDF/EPUB

Ghost Milk: Calling Time on the Grand Project [PDF / Epub] ☆ Ghost Milk: Calling Time on the Grand Project Author Iain Sinclair – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk An extraordinary, deeply personal book about a disappearing city from our greatest guide to London The Spectator East London is gleaming The stadium is finished, the new Olympic Park is being landscap An extraordinary, deeply personal book Calling Time MOBI ò about a disappearing city from our greatest guide to London The Spectator East London is gleaming The stadium is finished, the new Olympic Park is being landscaped, and shopping centers and apartment buildings stand at the ready, eager to be occupied by transient tourists and permanent residents alikeBut the story of London Ghost Milk: PDF/EPUB ² s Olympic renaissance is far from triumphant Indeed, though the shiny fa ades are seductive, whole blocks are being ripped apart The razing of East London is not a simple story of demolition and displacement it s a story of loss, of a neighborhood s history being stolen from itGhost Milk is a chronicle of a city turned Milk: Calling Time eBook ☆ upside down corner diners have given way to grandiose shopping centers gated pleasure domes have replaced public parks and the casual diversity of a neighborhood with centuries of history is being eradicatedIn this majestic book, Iain Sinclair explores the roots of this new London and a worldwide obsession with grand projects that stretches from Athens to Beijing Elegiac, intimate, and audacious, Ghost Milk is a tribute to a great city by its greatest chronicler.


10 thoughts on “Ghost Milk: Calling Time on the Grand Project

  1. Tobias Tobias says:

    I read this during the Olympics during which time I cycled past Iain Sinclair s house in Albion Drive, Hackney every day on my way to work I was trying my hardest to get into the Olympic spirit but finding it very difficult not having a functioning TV or any tickets to any events Enjoyed this book it was informative, poetic and grumpy.


  2. Vuk Trifkovic Vuk Trifkovic says:

    Very disappointing Sinclair has a specific style which takes bit of adjustment to, but this time around he s just lost the touch The thing is, whereas previous he came across as a critical voice, he just now sounds like a cranky old man So much of this stuff edges on the observational comedy of the lamest my council does not take paper cheques any , what s up with that sort.While he bangs on about the Olympics and the Grand Project so much of this book feels strung together with only Very disappointing Sinclair has a specific style which takes bit of adjustment to, but this time around he s just lost the touch The thing is, whereas previous he came across as a critical voice, he just now sounds like a cranky old man So much of this stuff edges on the observational comedy of the lamest my council does not take paper cheques any , what s up with that sort.While he bangs on about the Olympics and the Grand Project so much of this book feels strung together with only cursory Oh, but there is an Olympic theme here too link There is also few references too many to Ballard and Chris Petit Basically any time he touches upon West London, cars, mall, housing block or China and it s a lot he ll launch into a Oh, but Ballard What made the book particularly unpalatable is his disastrous comparison between the Nazis and New Labour Now, aside the fact that one might find this offensive, it s extremely lazy trick of calling someone a Nazi, particularly when parallels he is drawing out are fairly tenuous You know, Hitler was from Austria and so many of New Labour leaders were Scottish Clearly the same thing.All in all, Sinclair s writing maybe used to be intriguing, but now he s just another old hippie cook who calls everyone a Nazi and thinks it s hilarious to refer to New Labour as Nude Labour Basically, the internet is full of old ranters who will go on about Tony Bliar to read 400 pages of similar bleating from Iain Sinclair


  3. Andrewh Andrewh says:

    This is a typical Iain Sinclair book, but a better read than the rather weak eulogy to Hackney and all things Hackneyish i.e anyone who had ever been there, it seemed The current volume is ironically dedicated to the Mayor of Hackney for remaking the borough as a model surrealist wonderland and this line is perhaps the key one to this long screed of slightly incoherent prose Ostensibly a polemic on the use of architectural grand projects to renew cities, epitomised by the Olympics Westf This is a typical Iain Sinclair book, but a better read than the rather weak eulogy to Hackney and all things Hackneyish i.e anyone who had ever been there, it seemed The current volume is ironically dedicated to the Mayor of Hackney for remaking the borough as a model surrealist wonderland and this line is perhaps the key one to this long screed of slightly incoherent prose Ostensibly a polemic on the use of architectural grand projects to renew cities, epitomised by the Olympics Westfield Axis in Stratford which built on the superlative success of the Dome , as embraced by New Labour in the footsteps of Albert Speer, as we are reminded many times , the book does nevertheless follow the familiar pattern of poetic rambling literally so, as Sinclair embarks on many long urban walks and writes them up in his trademark gonzo flaneurist style there are such interesting hikes in Manchester, Berlin brilliantly , Athens and San Francisco here, for a change in direction of travel It rarely makes any sense as a whole most of the chapters are previously published essays but there are, as ever, great moments and shafts of illuminating prose on a wide variety of cultural topics novels, films, architecture and we get a sense of alternative and strange worlds beyond our everyday mundane view of life that make one want to look again at the city we live in That seems to be a victory of sorts, to me


  4. Stewart Home Stewart Home says:

    A banal reading of Ghost Milk might lead to an interpretation of the book as being about attempts at urban regeneration that are kick started through the staging of events such as the Olympic Games On this surface level the text is concerned not just with London 2012, but also earlier Olympic contests in Berlin, Athens, Munich and Mexico City as well as other urban renewal schemes Digging down into the deeper strata of this book, it is farthan merely a joke laden treatise about that no A banal reading of Ghost Milk might lead to an interpretation of the book as being about attempts at urban regeneration that are kick started through the staging of events such as the Olympic Games On this surface level the text is concerned not just with London 2012, but also earlier Olympic contests in Berlin, Athens, Munich and Mexico City as well as other urban renewal schemes Digging down into the deeper strata of this book, it is farthan merely a joke laden treatise about that notoriously tricky and slippery authorial construct known to the world as Iain Sinclair it is also a step by step guide to bringing poetry back to contemporary capitalist societies that are characterised by a sense of post modern disenchantmentRead the whole review here


  5. Eddie Eddie says:

    Sinclair writes about places, particularly London and its Edgelands, how they have changed and indeed in the interest of whom they have changed One of London s biggest recent changes has of course been the Olympic Park This project has followed a well trodden path which Sinclair calls The Grand Project He creates a sense of place that isthan just physical The prose comes at a frenetic pace and draws inspiration from old evocative black and white images, poetry, art, film and literatu Sinclair writes about places, particularly London and its Edgelands, how they have changed and indeed in the interest of whom they have changed One of London s biggest recent changes has of course been the Olympic Park This project has followed a well trodden path which Sinclair calls The Grand Project He creates a sense of place that isthan just physical The prose comes at a frenetic pace and draws inspiration from old evocative black and white images, poetry, art, film and literature It is then put together like a collage of images, some real and some imagined from literary characters Combined they give the sense of a what the place is like yet the picture is always slightly blurred by time and history He calls on, for example, the Divine Commedy to describe the financiers and other businessmen involved in the Olympic Park lost wrenches who prostitute themselves for gold and silver The tormentors waiting for usurpers in red braces Bankers with heavy bellies, advocates of fiscal alchemy, let them dance on hot coals and wade, up to the chin, in tides of their own excrement or words to the effect.Films add to the narrative, such as The Long Good Friday which ushers in an era of local given corruption, bent coppers, Kray hoodlums making overtures to the New York mafia with their property lawyers etc.Whether one agrees with Sinclair s central argument or not we need people like him to release that the past and indeed the present are complex and multi dimensional The future may become or indeed may have already become an environment which is much less rich and nuanced and serve only a small group of people or corporations


  6. severyn severyn says:

    Often, I would get to the end of a Sinclair paragraph and realise it was about something other than what I thought it was about.


  7. Obiora Okwudili Obiora Okwudili says:

    Descriptive.


  8. Matt Matt says:

    I had a harder time finishing this book than any I ve read in a while I think it might ve been that I was trying to read it right after school finished, when it s always hard for me to concentrate But I think, too, there was a disconnect for me, between the big picture, that huge projects like the Olympics tend to lead to bad things, and the specifics, which were way too local for me to follow Without understanding the nuance, it felt for a while that Sinclair was just repeating something tha I had a harder time finishing this book than any I ve read in a while I think it might ve been that I was trying to read it right after school finished, when it s always hard for me to concentrate But I think, too, there was a disconnect for me, between the big picture, that huge projects like the Olympics tend to lead to bad things, and the specifics, which were way too local for me to follow Without understanding the nuance, it felt for a while that Sinclair was just repeating something that wasn t too profound the first time time.But I persevered, and quite liked it by the end Sinclair has a punchy prose style lots of lists, fragments, but also really prolix run on sentences It s rarely elegant, but it had an equal mix of energy and deeply cerebral stuff going on He s also got a vocabulary that outstrips nearly anyone I can think of having read in a while It s hard to think of that being an attraction in itself, but I really enjoyed it and it added something to the experience of reading this.There are some funny, sometimes horrible things reported here I liked the idea of qualifying things as GP or Grand Projects, and the concept of direction of travel, wherein as long as you re heading someplace interesting from your perspective , whatever it takes to get there is beneath your notice obviously, Sinclair means to challenge that concept, but it s a good one to recognize as being out there As a concept, the titular ghost milk was oddly unclear to me at one point, he describes it as real milk from an imaginary thing, like I guess real civic improvements from a Utopian Olympic dream, only that s not what he means at all, so I kept getting confused It s a resonant image, even if I have no idea what it means.An interesting book, at any rate, a weird bit of reportage and political philosophy I kept forgetting, when reading it, that the Olympics did happen in London and were considered a success, at least by most measures In Sinclair s book, that possibility seems so far from likely


  9. Matthew Oliver Matthew Oliver says:

    Enjoyed thisthan I expected in the end, or at least I expected to enjoy it a lot until I started it At that point I realised I was in for a 415 page rant That s what I got but an entertaining rant I was pleased to discover The book takes aim at the grand projects of the modern era with a focus in the London Olympic Park but going back in time as far as the Berlin games of 1936 the first modern grand project to Sinclair s mind Also takes in smaller projects like the rebranding of variou Enjoyed thisthan I expected in the end, or at least I expected to enjoy it a lot until I started it At that point I realised I was in for a 415 page rant That s what I got but an entertaining rant I was pleased to discover The book takes aim at the grand projects of the modern era with a focus in the London Olympic Park but going back in time as far as the Berlin games of 1936 the first modern grand project to Sinclair s mind Also takes in smaller projects like the rebranding of various places as cities of culture slap up a new museum, put on a festival and bam, you can reinvent an old mill town just like that Draws heavily on themes of capitalist progress as a driver for change, loss of community, private gain, status and prestige, all wrapped in the guiding principle that it s all a swindle And he may be right He talks a lot about J G Ballard too I m not entirely sure why haven t read Ballard but figure there s some connection with themes of urban dystopia As well as the rant it s a ramble, mainly across London, southeast England and back and forth on the M62 If you know the places it s deeply evocative As a footnote it s interesting to think about grand projects as NZ embarks on a five year WW1 commemorative programme It s some kind if grand project of the mind and of our history


  10. Helen Helen says:

    As all his books are, this is quite strange and heavy going in places His style is not for everyone, but if you have read any of his other works you will be familiar with it lots and lots of words, much observational description of the places he passes through and lots of literary and historical allusion This book was published ahead of the London Olympics, of which he was highly critical the date is 2011 not 2001 as in the details here , but there is muchto this book than that He lo As all his books are, this is quite strange and heavy going in places His style is not for everyone, but if you have read any of his other works you will be familiar with it lots and lots of words, much observational description of the places he passes through and lots of literary and historical allusion This book was published ahead of the London Olympics, of which he was highly critical the date is 2011 not 2001 as in the details here , but there is muchto this book than that He looks at the Olympics in the context of other big vanity projects, without labouring the point of the comparisons too much there s an interesting excursion north to see the ruins of the M62 project, which swallowed a lot of money, and he takes in Berlin and the remnants of the 1936 games, with all that that stood for Refreshing to have someone prepared to step out of line on these issues many of us feel the same way but the inexorable propaganda machine rolls on and labels us naysayers Ah, well.Not an easy book to read, but worth persisting with it


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