A Hora da Inteligência Kindle ß A Hora Epub /

A Hora da Inteligência ☉ [PDF / Epub] ☆ A Hora da Inteligência By Poul Anderson ❤ – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Cover artist A PedroSabe se que nem toda a capacidade do c rebro utilizada, mesmo pelos mais inteligentes dos homens Provavelmente, o mesmo acontece com os animaisSuponha se que isso era consequ ncia Cover artist A PedroSabe se que nem toda a capacidade do c rebro utilizada, mesmo pelos mais inteligentes dos homens Provavelmente, o mesmo acontece com os animaisSuponha se que isso era consequ ncia do facto de a Terra estar no interior de um campo de for as que retardava a propaga o da luz e do mesmo modo afectava os processos electromagn ticos e electroqu micos Suponha se tamb m que um dia a Terra sa a desse campo de for as e que de um momento para o outro a A Hora Epub / intelig ncia de todos os homens e todos os animais triplicava Seria isso um benef cio Aparentemente, simMas a intelig ncia n o daria sentimentos humanos aos animaisE nem todos os homens se tornariam igualmente inteligentes Seriam mais inteligentes Uns mais, muito mais do que os outros a uma dist ncia nunca vistaAcima de tudo, no dia em que super intelig ncia humana permitisse encontrar solu es para todos os problemas, em que ocupariam os homens o seu tempo.


About the Author: Poul Anderson

Pseudonym A A Craig, Michael Karageorge, Winston P Sanders, P A KingsleyPoul William Anderson was an American science fiction author who began his career during one of the Golden Ages of the genre and continued to write and remain popular into the st century Anderson also authored several works of fantasy, historical novels, and a prodigious number of short stories He received numerous awards for his writing, including seven Hugo Awards and three Nebula Awards Anderson received a degree in physics from the University of Minnesota in He married Karen A Hora Epub / Kruse in They had one daughter, Astrid, who is married to science fiction author Greg Bear Anderson was the sixth President of Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, taking office in He was a member of the Swordsmen and Sorcerers Guild of America, a loose knit group of Heroic Fantasy authors founded in the s, some of whose works were anthologized in Lin Carter s Flashing Swords anthologies He was a founding member of the Society for Creative Anachronism Robert A Heinlein dedicated his novel The Cat Who Walks Through Walls to Anderson and eight of the other members of the Citizens Advisory Council on National Space Policy Poul Anderson died of cancer on July , , after a month in the hospital Several of his novels were published posthumously Series Time Patrol Psychotechnic League Trygve Yamamura Harvest of Stars King of Ys Last Viking Hoka Future history of the Polesotechnic League Flandry.



10 thoughts on “A Hora da Inteligência

  1. Stephen Stephen says:

    Prolific Grand Master Poul Anderson earned his place of honor within the hallowed halls of science fiction s best and brightest His work may not be as engagingly readable as Asimov, or as accessibly impactful as Clarke He was never as politically minded as Heinlein and his prose is not as slick and stylish as Vance or Zelazny However, I would argue that his product is among the top in so many areas that his wide ranging competencies, when married to his prodigious ability to spin the big ide Prolific Grand Master Poul Anderson earned his place of honor within the hallowed halls of science fiction s best and brightest His work may not be as engagingly readable as Asimov, or as accessibly impactful as Clarke He was never as politically minded as Heinlein and his prose is not as slick and stylish as Vance or Zelazny However, I would argue that his product is among the top in so many areas that his wide ranging competencies, when married to his prodigious ability to spin the big idea, make his catalog a required staple for any serious examination of science fiction SYNOPSIS Brain Wave is the quintessence of big idea science fiction and Anderson explores it with the skill of a veteran spelunker navigating through a vast underground expanse The Earth, having existed in a neural dampening field since the cretaceous period, suddenly emerges resulting in a five fold increase in intelligence for every person and animal on the planet Following this life altering event singularity, society immediately begins to breakdown as the first step of a radical realignment You have unskilled workers suddenly disenchanted with the monotony of their daily, yet essential jobs professionals finding their money and status centric occupations tiresome and unfulfilling large portions of the pre change highly intelligent finding nothing but confused madness on the other side of the IQ boost pigs, monkeys and other animals suddenly finding themselves questioning their place in humanity s world and equipped with the capacity to do something about it and regular joes and janes finding that heightened intelligence does not necessarily mean an end to prejudice, intolerance, fear and self doubt This is a fascinating premise for a what if novel and Poul does an admirable job, to the extent he is allowed, to explore the effects on human society and how life reorganizes itself when the age old hierarchies and social structures are shattered THOUGHTS I only gave this 3 stars really 3.5 This is not a reflection of the power or skill of Anderson s novel There is much of both within It s rather an acknowledgement of the shackles placed on Poul by his editors and the marketing gurus of the time, who required the book to fit within the slim 200 page format of SF stories of the time I believe this is a story begging to be allowed to breathe and develop and I think if Poul had been given the opportunity, this would be a 500 page, wide net examination of the many facets of what it means to be human As it is, we are limited to following a handful of individuals Peter Corinth, a brilliant by pre change standards research physicist Sheila Corinth, Peter s wife Felix Mandelbaum, a union official and Archie Brock, a mentally handicapped individual.Within the four individual stories we see the struggles faced by most of the world s population as they come to terms with the extreme increase in intelligence To Anderson s credit, he uses the time he is allotted to tell a compelling story The tales of both Sheila Corinth and Archie Brock are particularly moving It just could have been so muchIn addition to the unfortunate lack of full idea development, I found the ending, while good, to be not quite as wowza as I would have liked Still, this is a work that deserves to be read and I think isthan worth the ration of hours it will take to consume it A lesser known, but quality work by one of the best 3.5 stars Recommended highly


  2. Lyn Lyn says:

    Poul Anderson s Brain Wave is a novel concept earth has been existing in a force field that inhibited brain activity for eons Then, we finally move out of the field and suddenly all animal life, people and animals, experience a radical increase in intelligence I enjoy his writing and his approach to this unique idea, but the story itself was disjointed and unbalanced If this had remained a short story, and if the plot had beenlinear, this would have been much better I did like the non Poul Anderson s Brain Wave is a novel concept earth has been existing in a force field that inhibited brain activity for eons Then, we finally move out of the field and suddenly all animal life, people and animals, experience a radical increase in intelligence I enjoy his writing and his approach to this unique idea, but the story itself was disjointed and unbalanced If this had remained a short story, and if the plot had beenlinear, this would have been much better I did like the none too subtle message delivered that the economy suffered once everyone grewintelligent, delivering a stinging rebuke to a materialistic, overly commercialized society As it is, it is still very entertaining and enjoyable and Anderson s wonderful imagination is in full form


  3. Bradley Bradley says:

    Great concept, troubling conclusions I mean, isn t this what a lot of great SF is all about A great idea to explore and get really excited about, coupled with a great story for the personal impact We ve got half of this I almost squeed like a little girl with the idea that EVERYTHING on the planet got intelligent practically overnight All the animals jumped in intelligence as well as all the people We ve got the ultimate What If, laying the foundation for the later brilliant book by Keyes, Great concept, troubling conclusions I mean, isn t this what a lot of great SF is all about A great idea to explore and get really excited about, coupled with a great story for the personal impact We ve got half of this I almost squeed like a little girl with the idea that EVERYTHING on the planet got intelligent practically overnight All the animals jumped in intelligence as well as all the people We ve got the ultimate What If, laying the foundation for the later brilliant book by Keyes, Flowers for Algernon or even the Smart Barkley in ST TNG to a fairly epic level right off the bat, even laying the epic foundation for Vernor Vinge s Zones of Thought, the places in the galaxy where intelligence slows or speeds up to godlike levels depending on where you are, praying that you remain safe.So what s my problem Nothing too extreme, but each piles up and annoys until I just had to drop a few stars Probably the worst is just a feature of 1950 when this came out, namely the assumption and portrayal of women being idiots or lazy or hopelessly enamoured and stymied because of inaccessible men It drives me crazy It also happened in Poul Anderson s Tau Zero, which was also a great novel in all respects except this.Smaller issues Oh, like the assumption that with great intelligence the desire to prolong your own survival goes away You know, like maintaining simple commerce or getting things done I mean, come on, don t you think that if we got smarter we d see right through that bullshit and roll up our sleeves I mean, if everyone has broken the scale in intelligence, it s not like there would be anyone TO EXPLOIT It should be a no brainer that if you want to survive, then get to work.Oh yeah, and desiring to return to the way things were before Good grief Intelligence does not equal unhappiness I could make a good case that unhappiness in the very intelligent comes from being alone and unfulfilled So what if the new standard is higher across the board It means that we re all in the same boat as before, still needing to find meaning and connection in our lives It doesn t change just because of our IQ.Other than that, I do think the basic premise is pretty damn awesome and I d love to see a whole team of authors from all over the world try to tackle this issue seriously and creatively, not just an admittedly awesome author writing from 1950 from a narrow cultural viewpoint I d love to see what everyone else might come up with, because the idea is still fantastic and there can be a ton of really great play, here I might even say that this novel deserves a full 5 stars just for the concept and its robust beauty and how it continues to spark the imagination But the story kinda drags it down, alas Ooh, the opportunity


  4. Bill Kerwin Bill Kerwin says:

    I like returning to the classics of my youth, for I always discover not only something new about the work itself, but something about myself and how I have changed Sometimes, though, rediscovery is a mitigated pleasure sometimes I must face that fact that one of my old classics isn t really a classic after all.Re reading Brainwave was like that I still think the premise is a first class idea after a period of millions of years, the Earth moves out of a neuron hampering space field, and s I like returning to the classics of my youth, for I always discover not only something new about the work itself, but something about myself and how I have changed Sometimes, though, rediscovery is a mitigated pleasure sometimes I must face that fact that one of my old classics isn t really a classic after all.Re reading Brainwave was like that I still think the premise is a first class idea after a period of millions of years, the Earth moves out of a neuron hampering space field, and suddenly the brain power of all terrestrial creatures men and women, chimpanzees, pigs, sheep, even bunnies surges at an alarming rate How will the old human institutions, based on on the limited insights of inferior intellects, hold up under new scrutiny Will the brainy new humans rise to the challenge, or will they collapse under the strain of their new intelligence And the old domestic animals, the ones no longer too dumb to know any better how will they react to their inferior status Yes, these are good questions, and I remember being intrigued by the way Anderson attempted to answer them I particularly loved the parts of the book which took place on a recently abandoned farm operated by a mentally disabled man now of near genius I.Q, named Archie Brock, how he coped with the revolt of the crafty pigs and came to regret the slaughter of the sheep, who were now consciously, creepily, aware of their fate For years I remembered a particularly fine passage in which it was obvious that the sheep with the help of their Lord and Slaughterer Archie would soon be forming a religion As sometimes happens with re reads, I discovered I was right about the parts of the book I remembered, for these were the parts that worked well What I had forgotten about were the parts of the book that didn t work at all.The city portions of Brainwave don t work nearly as well as the farm parts There is a tedious love triangle that slows the action, and Anderson s attempt to create a new kind of speech for the super geniuses a slap dash fabrication consisting of normal dialogue in quotes, gestural emphases in quotations, and telepathic emotional messages in italics just seems complicated and even worse kinda dumb Poul Anderson is a smart writer, but the challenge of making a super genius sound smart is a challenge which thoroughly defeated him And it has defeated others before and after him too Although the Archie Brock sequences have a few problems of their own for example, the gun wielding circus chimpanzees working the farm resemble caricatures of field Negroes , they are extraordinarily successful Brock s point of view that of an extremely intelligent normal man who once was mentally disabled is both interesting in itself and useful for the narrative Brock could have provided all the insights into the brainwave event that the reader of this novel needed to hear.Yes, Poul Anderson should have taken the perennial advice given to rural youth since time immemorial Poul Anderson should have stayed down on the farm


  5. Scott Scott says:

    Imagine for a moment that humanity is a race of drooling idiot children, operating at 20 25% of our brain capacity Was that a stretch for you It wasn t for me, thinking of the US election, sundry pointless wars and the popularity of The Coolest on Kickstarter Now imagine that over the course of a few days the intelligence of every human and every animal on Earth expanded to four or five times their current level This is the central premise of Brain Wave.In Anderson s alternate universe o Imagine for a moment that humanity is a race of drooling idiot children, operating at 20 25% of our brain capacity Was that a stretch for you It wasn t for me, thinking of the US election, sundry pointless wars and the popularity of The Coolest on Kickstarter Now imagine that over the course of a few days the intelligence of every human and every animal on Earth expanded to four or five times their current level This is the central premise of Brain Wave.In Anderson s alternate universe our solar system has spent millions of years drifting through a section of the Galaxy suffused with a field that dampens electrical reactions, including those in animal brains As Brain Wave begins Earth has finally begun to exit this field, and the world changes overnight The mentally disabled become geniuses, the average person becomes an intellectual giant and the leading thinkers of the day acquire demi god like smarts Economies collapse as pointless consumerism ceases Millions of newly gifted thinkers walk off their unsatisfying jobs, no longer satisfied with tedious toil in pursuit of pointless fripperies The political system becomes irrelevant and humanity begins to look for new and greater challenges, our collective eyes turning towards the stars Meanwhile apes join revolutions in Africa while rabbits and pigs use their newly sharpened wits to escape from human traps and cages.However this sudden smarts boost bringsthan philosophising and higher sudoku scores Some people lose their sanity under the pressure of their new introspective powers, others join cults, riot and kill Folks whose limited mental abilities previously excluded them from mainstream society are boosted to genius level, but genius level is childlike in the new world order and these former outcasts are as separate from society as before, but with a far greater capacity to understand their separation and what their impairments mean for them.Anderson s exploration of the impact of all this extra brainpower is convincing, entertaining and thoughtful.Surprisingly, Brain Wave has aged pretty well One of my favourite and perhaps masochistic parts of reading older sci fi works is looking for the anachronistic clangers so common to books written in the mid 20th Century tape decks being used in far future century Martian colonies, physical letters being delivered by hand in the year 3026, the nonexistence or subservience of female characters that kind of thing Brain Wave is notably short of such bum notes, with only a few 50 s style sexist notes a female character s appearance being entirely judged on her attractiveness to men and references to intellectually handicapped individuals as morons and imbeciles Anderson s story holds up pretty well for a 2016 reader.This isn t a perfect book, or even a great one, but it s good, and the central concept is fascinating Apparently Anderson felt that Brain Wave was among his best books, and I would add that it is one of the better works of SF from the 1950s that I ve read The central concept was one that I found immensely appealing Life in a society of geniuses comprised of a general public able to see through the nasty political propaganda swamping us and the self destructive work and consumption habits that our society currently champions sounds pretty good to me.3.5 stars


  6. Apatt Apatt says:

    The blurb on the front cover of the paperback version reads A panoramic story of what happens to a world gone super intelligent That sums the basic premise up so perfectly it saves me writing a synopsis hurrah.I love high concepts, They make it easier to pitch to my GR friends Brain Wave is about every living creature in the world suddenly having their intellectthan quadrupled Such a deceptively simple premise, it seems like anybody can write a story about this However, Poul An The blurb on the front cover of the paperback version reads A panoramic story of what happens to a world gone super intelligent That sums the basic premise up so perfectly it saves me writing a synopsis hurrah.I love high concepts, They make it easier to pitch to my GR friends Brain Wave is about every living creature in the world suddenly having their intellectthan quadrupled Such a deceptively simple premise, it seems like anybody can write a story about this However, Poul Anderson is one of sf s all time greats, and here he managed to spin out a lot of imaginative yet entirely believable ramifications from such an event.Referring back to that aforementioned blurb again the panoramic story part refers to a multiple viewpoints structure which allows the author to create a detailed post IQ boost world Here Anderson focuses on a wide range of people, among them some scientists, a housewife, a simple farmhand, and some monkeys Super intellect as it turns out is not desirable for everyone, a lot of people go insane from suddenly thinking and perceiving too much People who hold menial jobs now find repetition and lack of challenge intolerable so they quit in droves While this is not a post apocalypse world it does have a similar feel to it, with government breaking down, people deserting their jobs, and pigs attacking people This is a very short novel 175 pages so not a lot of time is spent on character development, I do like the farmhand plot strand, though, it has a Flowers for Algernon vibe to it without the tragic ending The average housewife s story is also poignant Andersen s prose is as highly readable as ever, his science background is once again put to good use I like his explanation not infodump of how this Brain Wave came about, for Tau Zero fans often cited as Anderson s best book there is a little subplot that does something different with the runaway spaceship idea.This is an excellent little book, well worth anybody s time It may not actually boost your intelligence but may give it a wee nudge in the right direction


  7. David David says:

    Throughout earth s history, it has been in a region of the galaxy where some sort of force field has inhibited the activity of brain neurons As the solar system spins around the galaxy, the earth exits this region, and almost overnight, all living creatures with brains are impacted Brain neurons firerapidly, and as a result, they all become smarter Smart people become geniuses, morons become very smart, and animals gain in intelligence as well.Society turns upside down People who previ Throughout earth s history, it has been in a region of the galaxy where some sort of force field has inhibited the activity of brain neurons As the solar system spins around the galaxy, the earth exits this region, and almost overnight, all living creatures with brains are impacted Brain neurons firerapidly, and as a result, they all become smarter Smart people become geniuses, morons become very smart, and animals gain in intelligence as well.Society turns upside down People who previously had an inner purpose in life, some aspiration or goal, use their new boost in intelligence to their advantage, and to society s advantage as well People who previously had no goals, ambitions, or purpose in life have great difficulties they still retain their old personalities, their superstitions and prejudices, and become despondent or even violent The story follows several people through these changes a scientist, his wife, and a low intelligence farmhand.While the premise is brilliant, the execution is not It bothered me that during the faster than light space travel, relativistic effects were ignored a science fiction writer should at least mention these effects, and try to make the consequences seem plausible Also, so much of the plot is quite predictable The dialog is often trite While some reviewers complain that the book is too short, I am glad that it is not longer


  8. Sandy Sandy says:

    It seems as if I have read a lot of articles recently on the so called dumbing down of society, and of U.S school kids particularly I d hate to think that these stories have a basis in reality, but still, consider the facts In the most recent two hour PISA Program for International Student Assessment tests, given every three years around the world to determine students abilities in reading, math and science, U.S schoolchildren came in at only the 35th place among 64 countries in math It seems as if I have read a lot of articles recently on the so called dumbing down of society, and of U.S school kids particularly I d hate to think that these stories have a basis in reality, but still, consider the facts In the most recent two hour PISA Program for International Student Assessment tests, given every three years around the world to determine students abilities in reading, math and science, U.S schoolchildren came in at only the 35th place among 64 countries in math skills, and at only the 27th in science Singapore and Hong Kong came in at No 1, respectively A schoolteacher friend of mine was remarking just the other day how poor his grade school kids are at problem solving a wave of anti intellectualism seems to be gaining traction and I ve noticed that half the folks during my NYC subway commute are either playing Candy Crush or are engaged in some other video game, rather than reading a book or newspaper, as would have been the case 10 years ago And let s not even discuss those hilarious old Jay Leno Jaywalking segments How refreshing for me, then, to come across a book that has, as its central conceit, the notion that mankind might someday grow vastly MORE intelligentand not just mankind, but all sentient life on Earth, as well The novel in question, Poul Anderson s Brain Wave, made its first appearance in book form a 35 cent Ballantine paperback in 1954, although its opening chapters had appeared the year before in the eighth and final issue of the short lived pulp publication Space Science Fiction In 1997, four years before his death at age 74, Anderson remarked that it is one of the five novels for which he d like to be remembered, and now that I have finally read Brain Wave, I can see why.The book s fascinating central premise is this For the last several hundred million years, Earth s solar system had been passing through an area of space that contained an inhibitory field of sorts a field that slowed down the neurons of all living things As Brain Wave begins, Earth is finally emerging from this light years wide field, with the result that the IQs of most human beings quadruple, to around 500, and even the animals of the field become vastlyintelligent Anderson s book tracks the progression of this new era by focusing on a few central characters Peter Corinth, a physicist at the NYC based Rossman Institute, a think tank that is one of the first to discover the reason for humanity s great change Sheila Corinth, Peter s wife, who cannot adapt to her newfound brain power and suffers a literal mental breakdown as a result Felix Mandelbaum, a labor organizer who rises to prominence after the great change engenders a host of world altering dilemmas Nat Lewis, a Rossman biologist and finally, Archie Brock, a mental simpleton before the change, but now left in charge of millionaire Rossman s upstate NY farm, seeing to the suddenly rebellious pigs and cows for some reason, those attacking farm animals brought to my mind the similar ferocious domestic critters in the 1956 sci fi film Beast With a Million Eyes with the assistance of some escaped circus animals an elephant and two chimpanzees Long considered a classic of sorts, today, Brain Wave seems to enjoy a mixed reputation Writing of the novel in his Ultimate Guide to Science Fiction, Scottish critic David Pringle tells us the book is fondly remembered but that it has not worn well, and the writing now seems thin and clich d On the other hand, The Science Fiction Encyclopedia has called it Anderson s most famous single novel, and possibly his finest Personally, I tend to agreewith the latter statement, and despite my respect for Pringle s opinions I have cited him often in my reviews before , must confess that I have no idea what the heck he is talking about here Thin and clich d Is he serious I found Anderson s writing to be almost poetically beautiful in spots How heavily the sea rolled Even indoors, he could hear it grinding against the shore, tumbling rocks, grinding away the world like the teeth of time It was gray and white to the edge of the world, white maned horses stamping and galloping, how terribly loud they neighed , and found his thoughts on the ramifications of a suddenly brilliant humankind very insightful In Brain Wave, humanity initially breaks down after the change due to panicky fear, an upsurge in crackpot religions such as the hedonistic rage called the Third Ba al , and the refusal of a suddenly hyper intelligent populace to perform menial labor I did not find this last plot point as implausible as some readers apparently have, and indeed, can well identify with a worker who feels that he she is droning away in a job for which he she feels overqualified For me, Anderson s prose was highly moving and convincing on this score to wit You take a typical human, a worker in factory or office, his mind dulled to a collection of verbal reflexes, his future a day to day plodding which offered him nothan a chance to fill his belly and be anesthetized by a movie or his televisionand bigger automobiles,and brighter plastics, onward and upward with the American Way of Life Even before the change, there had been an inward hollowness in Western civilization, an unconscious realization that there ought to bein life than one s own ephemeral self and the ideal had not been forthcoming Then suddenly, almost overnight, human intelligence had exploded toward fantastic heights An entire new cosmos opened before this man, visions, realizations, thought boiling unbidden within him He saw the miserable inadequacy of his life, the triviality of his work, the narrow and meaningless limits of his beliefs and conventions and he resigned Anderson fills his novel with many surprising twists, including the construction of mankind s first faster than light starship, and the subsequent shakedown tour of the nearby galaxy that Peter and Nat engage in a budding romance between Peter and his fellow Institute coworker Helga and a secret cabal planning to construct a device to revert mankind back to its pre change intelligence levels Curiously, mankind even manages to invent a new shorthand language for itself after the change, incorporating gestures and other visual cues, and Anderson repeatedly lets us see this new language at work, employing words in parentheses to indicate what is unspoken, and words in italics to indicate what is merely thought I know that a lot of readers here prefer to listen to audiobooks rather than to read in the traditional sense, but feel that Brain Wave, for this very reason, simply could not work as an audiobook I just can t see how any narrator could possibly communicate these parenthetical and italicized elements Similarly, I don t believe that Alfred Bester s The Demolished Man and The Stars My Destination, with their various fonts and illustrative typography, or H Rider Haggard s She, with its reams of Greek, Latin, Old English, black letter and uncial lettering, could ever be conveyed via audiobook, either Good as it is, Brain Wave yet comes to us today with some minor problems The mention of Idlewild Airport and the Belgian Congo inevitably dates the book a little, and several plot points a native revolution in Africa being abetted by superintelligent apes a Russian revolution being abetted by telepathic Sensitives a Chinese philosopher who walks the land, training the people in the power of the mind are raised over the course of a few pages, only to peter out and never be addressed again I am hardly the first reader to acknowledge that the book is a little on the short side, especially for a story so universal in scope and far reaching in consequence Anderson s book could easily have been twice as long, or as mankind prepares to leave Earth and reach for the stars merely the opening salvo in a GREAT CHANGE series Still, what we have here is fairly dynamite beautifully written, well thought out, involving, and ultimately, quite touching Indeed, the final chapter even left me a little misty eyed Thus, I do highly recommend Brain Wave to all readers You will surely find itedifying than a game of Angry Birds, that s for certain By the way, this review initially appeared on the FanLit website at a most excellent destination for all fans of Poul Anderson


  9. Jim Jim says:

    Written in the mid fifties, this book postulates what would happen if the Earth emerged from a ray that dampens intelligence so we are all suddenly a lot smarter So are animals This is pure SF, one of my early reads the reason I kept reading it No, it s not perfect, but there is a lot of room for thought here Anderson does a great job of providing it Written in the mid fifties, this book postulates what would happen if the Earth emerged from a ray that dampens intelligence so we are all suddenly a lot smarter So are animals This is pure SF, one of my early reads the reason I kept reading it No, it s not perfect, but there is a lot of room for thought here Anderson does a great job of providing it


  10. Denis Denis says:

    I really loved this book after I finished it As I read it, it did have all that stuff that Anderson does that sorta irks me from previous books of his, such as overly sentimental soap opera small talk between important scenes That aside, there are many beautiful descriptive, almost poetic prose at the start of each chapter, setting the scene The overall premise of the story is absolutely great We humans and animals here on Earth had been impaired for many millennia by some cosmic field We I really loved this book after I finished it As I read it, it did have all that stuff that Anderson does that sorta irks me from previous books of his, such as overly sentimental soap opera small talk between important scenes That aside, there are many beautiful descriptive, almost poetic prose at the start of each chapter, setting the scene The overall premise of the story is absolutely great We humans and animals here on Earth had been impaired for many millennia by some cosmic field We have, however, as all other living creatures do on this planet, adapted and in spite of this impairment, managed to evolve as intelligent beings just the same, but as this field moved on, we, human and animal, were flung to super intellect Pretty darn cool Much opportunity to speculate how we would cope and how we would exploit such a situation And Poul Anderson did a first rate job with this and this, quite early in his career 1954 As I have mentioned, little slight annoyances, such as a two tier class of citizens enlightened geniuses who longer feel the need to stay on Earth and the gone insane and somewhat now smarter morons apes included those having the pleasure of doing the laborious work such as building and farming and keeping the machine going while the enlighten ones spent their time doing a lot of thinking This element was a little off for me, tough not entirely It does reflect a little in a way, our current world for example, most farming in North America is done by seasonal migrant workers from less affluent countries.In the end, a good read An original and well told story It seems to me that I favour P Anderson s earlier work over the later stuff thus far not enough data as he was so prolific and I have but scratched the surface as of yet


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