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Os Negros Anos Luz ❰PDF / Epub❯ ☁ Os Negros Anos Luz Author Brian W. Aldiss – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Cover artist A PedroThe human species has begun to racket about the galaxy When they reach the planet Grudgrodd, they come across another space faring species It s a case of instant dislike The gentle Cover artist A PedroThe human species has begun to racket about the galaxy When they reach the planet Grudgrodd, they come across another space faring species It s a case of instant dislike The gentle Utods do not feel pain, they change sex as the planet changes suns, they live long pleasurable lives, free of stress They wallow in their own middens But Civilisation is the distance man has placed between himself and his excreta So the carnage begins.


10 thoughts on “Os Negros Anos Luz

  1. Lyn Lyn says:

    The Dark Light Years by Brian Aldiss, first published in 1964, makes me realize what an important voice Aldiss is in the science fiction genre.As I write this in May 2015, Mr Aldiss is 89 years old and still writing Named a Grand Master by the Science Fiction Writers of America in 2000 and inducted by the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 2004, he has received two Hugo Awards, one Nebula Award, and one John W Campbell Memorial Award.The Dark Light Years, somewhat dated by today s tech heavy lit The Dark Light Years by Brian Aldiss, first published in 1964, makes me realize what an important voice Aldiss is in the science fiction genre.As I write this in May 2015, Mr Aldiss is 89 years old and still writing Named a Grand Master by the Science Fiction Writers of America in 2000 and inducted by the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 2004, he has received two Hugo Awards, one Nebula Award, and one John W Campbell Memorial Award.The Dark Light Years, somewhat dated by today s tech heavy literary standards, describes a first contact scenario where the peaceful and philosophical alien Utods, dubbed rhino men by unsophisticated spacers because of their bulk and slovenly behavior though Aldiss description seemsakin to a terrestrial hippopotamus make an important distinction from the warlike and destructive humans.Representative of the best of science fiction, this work makes me think of Starship Troopers and The Forever War, with Aldiss evocative and profound narrative of our world grown bellicose and wasteful His imaginative creation of the Utods and their unique society is reminiscent of Ursula Le Guin and also, to a lesser andsuperficial degree, Heinlein s 1954 juvenile work The Star Beast.Finally, Aldiss s conception of the Utods, and their hog like behavior, is deliciously innovative and forms a dramatic irony with his subtle, though scathing indictment of the worst in our nature


  2. Stephen Stephen says:

    4.0 to 4.5 stars Another excellent science fiction novel by Mr Aldiss Better than Non Stop but not as good as Hothouse my favorite Aldiss novel , this is a darkly humorous and satirical look at the darker side of humanity and horribly we get it wrong when we come across a peaceful alien species that evolved differently from us Smart, well written, at times funny and leaves you with much to think about Highly Recommended 4.0 to 4.5 stars Another excellent science fiction novel by Mr Aldiss Better than Non Stop but not as good as Hothouse my favorite Aldiss novel , this is a darkly humorous and satirical look at the darker side of humanity and horribly we get it wrong when we come across a peaceful alien species that evolved differently from us Smart, well written, at times funny and leaves you with much to think about Highly Recommended


  3. Paul Bryant Paul Bryant says:

    THE MILD PLEASURES OF ANTIQUE SCIENCE FICTIONWhat you get with 52 year old science fiction novels is the past s version of the future, which is fun So in 1964 Brian Aldiss sets his story in 2035 and in this 2035 everyone is still smoking but a derivative of mescaline, not tobacco , hardly anyone is still eating meat, but women are still an oddity in the professions and the space faring crews And there s war on between Britain and Brazil Ah well, maybe in twenty years from now, that will turn THE MILD PLEASURES OF ANTIQUE SCIENCE FICTIONWhat you get with 52 year old science fiction novels is the past s version of the future, which is fun So in 1964 Brian Aldiss sets his story in 2035 and in this 2035 everyone is still smoking but a derivative of mescaline, not tobacco , hardly anyone is still eating meat, but women are still an oddity in the professions and the space faring crews And there s war on between Britain and Brazil Ah well, maybe in twenty years from now, that will turn out to be true So after some years of space exploration and around 300 Earth type planets, humans have not yet found any life form worth writing home about Then they land on the next planet and find the utods, who are like these 30 ton hippo ish two headed six retractable limbs with opposing claws creatures who appear to have come to the said planet in a spaceship of their own crafted from a very large wooden pod, so their spaceship is made of wood, how ecological is that, suck it up metal obsessed earthlings The utods do not wear no clothes and they appear not to have no written script and also have as their prime recreational pursuit, instead of tv, mud and shit baths where they make this loverly stenchy filth and pour it over each other out of pure joy Well, but naturally the first reaction of the Earth soldiers is to shoot them But strangely enough, they don t take umbrage.So one profound question asked by The Dark light Years is as follows Is space travel necessarily a sign of intelligence Brian Aldiss is one of the greats of British SF but in this early novel he is still writing dialogue like thisGet knotted, Duffield, you ruddy trouble maker Which I can t think anyone will be saying in the year 2035 and I doubt were still saying in 1964, although, come to think of it, that could be a line said by Norm Norman Rossington to John Lennon in A Hard Day s Night.Anyway, this is a wry comedy with the usual depressing things to say about the human race and one especially shocking dissection scene which Bret Easton Ellis would have appreciated I want to read all of Mr Aldiss s stuff eventually he is still with us, coming up to his 91st birthday in August and this was a good place to start


  4. Bandit Bandit says:

    Civilization is a distance the man has placed between him and his excreta What an idea, though, of course, not without its limitations Conceptually this is precisely the sort of scifi I enjoy The sort that uses fictional constructs to address serious topics The sort that uses aliens to talk about humanity In this case the fictional construct is an alien race found and found offensive by earth explorers Offense in the form of not subscribing to standard humanoid measures of hygiene It matt Civilization is a distance the man has placed between him and his excreta What an idea, though, of course, not without its limitations Conceptually this is precisely the sort of scifi I enjoy The sort that uses fictional constructs to address serious topics The sort that uses aliens to talk about humanity In this case the fictional construct is an alien race found and found offensive by earth explorers Offense in the form of not subscribing to standard humanoid measures of hygiene It matters not, of course, that Utods are in fact a sophisticated race with advanced technology and philosophy, the men confined by their impregnable anthropomorphism and galvanized by narrow minded prejudice see their wallowing in mud habit and their excretions as appalling, thus rendering the entire race as inferior, thus making it ok to slaughter, imprison and torture So this really is a sociopolitical satire about humankind s rationalization for violence through their inability to understand another culture and thus perceiving it as lesser A lesson in xenophobia and quite a timely one The gentle intelligent Utods didn t stand a chance The novel was written in 1964 and occasionally reads as such, particularly when it comes to visions of distant future which to us isor less now Funny how the present time is both infinitelyand infinitely less stranger than once imagined The writing was good and so, for the most part, was the pacing If read purely as entertainment without consideration for its meaning, this may be considered slightly lackluster, but at nay ratewhy not read smartly Served as a worthy introduction to a new author, I ve never experienced before outside of cinematic adaptation Certainly makes you think, which is really what books ought to do After all, Epictetus was rightbooks are the training weights of the mind Recommended


  5. Manny Manny says:

    Brian Aldiss loved challenging the basic assumptions of Western civilisation Here, it s cleanliness Most SF writers it for granted that beings from any advanced culture will keep themselves clean and neat So Aldiss introduces the Utods, who are sophisticated enough to have invented interstellar travel, but look vaguely like hippopotami and spend their time wallowing in their own dung The idea s nice, and the ending is effective and generates suitable outrage, but unfortunately the rest of Brian Aldiss loved challenging the basic assumptions of Western civilisation Here, it s cleanliness Most SF writers it for granted that beings from any advanced culture will keep themselves clean and neat So Aldiss introduces the Utods, who are sophisticated enough to have invented interstellar travel, but look vaguely like hippopotami and spend their time wallowing in their own dung The idea s nice, and the ending is effective and generates suitable outrage, but unfortunately the rest of the book doesn t quite live up to its initial promise Still worth reading though


  6. Sandy Sandy says:

    It had been a good 30 years since I last read anything by British sci fi author Brian Aldiss Back in the mid 80s, spurred on by three highly laudatory articles in David Pringle s Science Fiction The 100 Best Novels, I had eagerly read Aldiss classic novel of a generational starship, Non Stop 1958 his equally classic tale of an Earth billions of years hence, Hothouse 1962 and his underrated novel of an Earth gone sterile due to fallout radiation, Greybeard 1964 , back to back t It had been a good 30 years since I last read anything by British sci fi author Brian Aldiss Back in the mid 80s, spurred on by three highly laudatory articles in David Pringle s Science Fiction The 100 Best Novels, I had eagerly read Aldiss classic novel of a generational starship, Non Stop 1958 his equally classic tale of an Earth billions of years hence, Hothouse 1962 and his underrated novel of an Earth gone sterile due to fallout radiation, Greybeard 1964 , back to back to back as well as his volume of linked stories, 1959 s Galaxies Like Grains of Sand and had loved them all But, between this and that, as I said, no Aldiss for me since then On a whim, thus, I recently picked up the author s The Dark Light Years, which had been patiently sitting on my bookshelf, unread, for a very long time This novel, the author s sixth in the sci fi realm, does not enjoy as good a reputation as those first three just mentioned Pringle, in his Ultimate Guide to Science Fiction, says that the book is enjoyable but minor Aldiss, while The Science Fiction Encyclopedia refers to it as a lesser work Still, as might be expected from a multiple Hugo and Nebula Award winner, not to mention a future Science Fiction Grand Master, even lesser Aldiss has something to commend itself to the modern day reader, nowthan half a century since its release in 1964.An extremely cynical novel of first contact, The Dark Light Years the lack of a hyphen between those last two words is annoying takes place in the year 2035, except for the opening and closing sections, which transpire 40 years later The book, in essence, gives us the history of Earth s relationship with the so called utods, a race that an Earth exploration ship had discovered on the planet Clementina, around 100 light years distant The utods, typically, are first found wallowing in a mudpit beside the banks of a river Resembling two headed hippopotami, the race is soon nicknamed rhinomen by the Terrans, who waste little time in slaughtering a half dozen of them and bringing a couple of others back to the Exozoo in London for study Although the reader is made privy to the utods conversation amongst themselves a conversation that quickly assures us that the utods are both intelligent and the products of a sophisticated culture the various investigators who we meet cannot crack their language at all, and are fairly well convinced that these rhinomen are littlethan interesting beastsdespite the fact that a small, wooden spaceship had been found near the utods wallow on Clementina.Another factor arguing against their intelligence the fact that the utods love nothing so much as rolling around in the mud and in their own excrement A race of coprophiles, the utods actually revel in their own dung, and their wooden star vessel is literally caked in it Can such an ugly looking race, with such unsanitary habits, possibly be one harboring intelligence As might be expected, the answer is an unqualified yes as might also be expected, things go as well for the utods here as they did for some other maltreated groups that Aldiss brings up the Polynesians, the Guanches, the American Indians, the Tasmanians , in this mordant look at Man s first interstellar dealings The Dark Light Years is a short novel, and one that is difficult to love For one thing, there are hardly any Earth characters in it whom one can admire with the possible exception of Aylmer Ainson, who is marooned on the utod homeworld of Dapdrof for 40 years to study the beasts, but who is only present in the novel briefly , and indeed, most of the characters Aylmer s father Bruce, the weak willed explorer who discovers the utods Mihaly Pasztor , the wily head of the Exozoo Hilary Warhoon, an attractive, middle aged cosmeclectic with good intentions but who is, ultimately, easily led astray and Hank Quilter, a trigger happy crewman are ultimately shown in a less than flattering light As might also be expected, the only two characters who manage to arouse the reader s sympathy are the captured utods themselves, and their horrible treatment while here on Earth manages to both shock and offend.Aldiss book is a thoughtful one, raising questions regarding the nature of intelligence, beauty, and civilization, although it is a tad clinical and dry Fortunately, the author manages to counterbalance the aridity with occasional, pleasing dollops of humor I love it when he tells us that after a period of revolutionary cleanliness, hundreds of years earlier in utodian history, law and ordure were restored Also amusing when Aldiss refers to the utods habit of politely excreting on one another as Do to others as you would be dung by when he refers to the three times gravity on a utod planet as a crippling tripling and when he mentions that one of the obscure utodian folk arts is called blishing American sci fi author James Blish, it will be remembered, famously criticized Hothouse for its scientific implausibilities Aldiss accentuates the satirical nature of his work by giving his utods outrageous, borderline silly names such as Blug Lugug, Snok Snok Karn and Quequo Kifful , and their home planets such appellations as Buskey, Clubshub and the previously mentioned Dapdrof He also throws in made up words that he never bothers to elucidate grokkies, an apparent homage to Robert A Heinlein s 1961 classic Stranger in a Strange Land, are journalists, I assume, but what is the female fashion style flared mock male with recessed carnation poltroons, and what is a magnastic bathytherm Adding to the rather strange feel of the book are little oddball anecdotes regarding minor characters who just kind of peter out, and the stilted, unnatural sounding conversations that most of the characters engage in.Fortunately, Aldiss also peppers his novel with many ingenious and imaginative touches, such as the background war that is transpiring between Britain and Brazil on the newly discovered deep freeze planet beyond Pluto, dubbed Charon the author, in a fascinating aside, here gives us some of the rules governing 21st century warfare the mescahale smokes that many characters imbibe in inhaled powdered mescaline, if I m reading the author correctly the complicated monorail system surrounding 21st century London the face masks that all London residents must wear in the street, to protect themselves from the ghastly air pollution the d cor motif known as Ur Organic and the californium slugs with an impact force equivalent to seventeen tons of TNT spat out by the rifle toting Earth goons as they engage in their explorations Aldiss book IS a brief one, as I mentioned, densely and compactly written, and I cannot help feel that its brevity works against it Still, his barbs shot against us silly humans are well aimed ones It would have been nice to have revisited the curious utods in another, later book, but sadly, by the end of this one, there are shockingly few of them left Turns out that the residents of Dapdrof fared even worse than had the Native Americans In all, yes, The Dark Light Years is a lesser Aldiss affair, but one still worth, uh, wallowing in By the way, this review originally appeared on the FanLit website at a most ideal destination for all fans of Brian Aldiss


  7. Stephen Thomas Stephen Thomas says:

    SNOK SNOK OF THE GRUDGRODD This slim novel is a wryly humorous indictment of man s boundless arrogance Failure to comprehend an existence that is starkly at odds with our own leads to the mistaken conclusion that the utods are littlethan vaguely bright cattle Throughout the story the strange alien s serene intelligence is either misconstrued or missed completely Only one man, who decides to exile himself in order to observe the creatures in their own environment, will ever understand th SNOK SNOK OF THE GRUDGRODD This slim novel is a wryly humorous indictment of man s boundless arrogance Failure to comprehend an existence that is starkly at odds with our own leads to the mistaken conclusion that the utods are littlethan vaguely bright cattle Throughout the story the strange alien s serene intelligence is either misconstrued or missed completely Only one man, who decides to exile himself in order to observe the creatures in their own environment, will ever understand the profound connection they have with their world and each other.This isn t one of Aldiss s best The humour can be a little smug and the narrative seems to lack conviction Also, the depth of characterisation and description doesn t live up to that of his better work That said, as always with Aldiss, this is still worth a read


  8. Tim Tim says:

    I feel bad giving this a two but that s how it pans out A fantastic concept that I was excited Aldiss came up with, but the story is just not up to expectations I have read many other of his titles I ll just leave it at that.


  9. Chris Chris says:

    Humanity has met many species of semi sapient lifeforms on its expansion across the galaxies, but had never discovered another intelligent race before That changed when a group of explorers ran into the utod Hippopotomi sized, two headed mammals that wallow in mud and their own filth, traversing the galaxy in wooden spacecraft, the utod are gentle creatures who feel no pain, can change their gender, and communicate in a complex series of whistles and hoots from their eight orifaces Needless t Humanity has met many species of semi sapient lifeforms on its expansion across the galaxies, but had never discovered another intelligent race before That changed when a group of explorers ran into the utod Hippopotomi sized, two headed mammals that wallow in mud and their own filth, traversing the galaxy in wooden spacecraft, the utod are gentle creatures who feel no pain, can change their gender, and communicate in a complex series of whistles and hoots from their eight orifaces Needless to say, humanity s gut instinct on first contact is to gun down all but two of them Taken back to the London Exozoo, the sharpest human minds attempt to converse with the remaining creatures, only to see them fail every man made test for intelligence Meanwhile, the utod refuse to open communications with this strange race of two legged creatures whose second orifice is hidden under clothing, and who shun the holiness of a middenwallow in favor of abject cleanliness.It sounds like the perfect setup for a social satire and that s exactly what Aldiss provides, a kind of first contact, post colonial take on humanity s anthropocentric expectations of what an alien intelligence should look act like Like other such satires Pohl s Jem comes to mind , it isn t as good at being a novel as it is as biting social commentary Aldiss writing is good, as always, but the pacing and particularly the characterization is weaker than normal The characters are wooden and under developed while one critical character isn t introduced until the third to last chapter Most exist as one dimensional stand ins for what Aldiss is mocking, the pompous scientists who are already convinced that these grotesque beasts aren t intelligent despite any sign to the contrary A bit too much hyperbole for some, but I think it amps up the satire when there s only ever one sane man in the room.Come for the social commentary, which is spot on if you enjoy social satire SF ala Pohl, Sheckley, Tenn, and others, there s a good chance you ll like this one Just lower your expectations a bit before diving in While it s not a bad novel, the pacing and characters haves some serious issues, and it isn t quite able to deliver on its brilliant premise.Full review, and other reviews of Aldiss and classic SF, on my blog


  10. Rjyan Rjyan says:

    Whoa This is my first Aldiss As it starts, this book is a little frustrating, but pretty irresistible, eventually the frustrations are revealed to have been an ingenious device Aldiss is really good at keeping his skepticism about our present civilization just barely visible, likewise having the unfortunate aspects of his characters personalities slip out briefly almost accidentally just enough to be damning without bludgeoning us with them Attention to detail really pays dividends Whoa This is my first Aldiss As it starts, this book is a little frustrating, but pretty irresistible, eventually the frustrations are revealed to have been an ingenious device Aldiss is really good at keeping his skepticism about our present civilization just barely visible, likewise having the unfortunate aspects of his characters personalities slip out briefly almost accidentally just enough to be damning without bludgeoning us with them Attention to detail really pays dividends here will rapidly convince you that Mr Aldiss has brilliant foresight restraint Even once I d sussed out just how deviously clever the author really was, the emotional impact of the ending still felt like being caught in an ambush I will absolutely be readingbooks by this man soon


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