[Ebook] Shutting Out the Sun: How Japan Created Its Own Lost Generation By Michael Zielenziger – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk



10 thoughts on “Shutting Out the Sun: How Japan Created Its Own Lost Generation

  1. says:

    One of the things you learn about Japan when you get here and you learn it pretty quickly is that there can be a vast difference between the appearance of Japan and the reality of it The faces that people show you, or even that the city shows you, is not necessarily their true face.Take Kyoto as an example it prides itself on being a city of traditional culture, the touchstone of all that is Truly Japanese When you first see it, though, you think, Really Because it looks like a big ol jumbled up city to me And it does aside from the temples, which remain or less relegated to the edges of the city, the vestiges of Old Japan have been swept away in favor of concrete and glass Kyoto Station is a glimmering lump in the middle of the city, and Kyoto Tower, as many have said, is a stake through its heart But ask anyone and we ll say, Kyoto is a beautiful city Because that s the way it s supposed to be.This is how it is to live in Japan There is a gulf between the true nature of things and the way we want them to be For someone born and raised here, this kind of thinking is taught from birth, and without...


  2. says:

    This book alternates between insightful journalism and bizarre conclusions.The first few chapters are a sensitive and well researched investigation of this hikikomori phenomenon, of some three million adults who become total recluses from modern life, often staying in their own apartments He asks their parents, physicians, and even is fortunate enough to interview these self exiles from society.What does he find causes this Childhood trauma, an intense and violent bullying system, immense academic pressure to succeed, further pressure to get a job and work, and to fulfill group expectations, but with very few real outlets for releasing individual stress, and an immense stigma towards mental illness Add onto the fact that Japan has been in a recession of sorts since the 1990s, and there is little present hope for improving the job market and letting people work and get rid of the crushing societal obligations placed upon them.Those people who do work in society have their own flaws He notes an unusual obsession towards brand name goods and mass media, as a means of forming a societal group clique or a sense of identity where none would previously exist.After his brilliant framing of the problem, however, Zielenziger draws some odd conclusions He offers up South Korea as a vibrant counterpoint against Japan s stagnation, but the former has their own problems too Their recession, albeit recent, is still severe annual GDP growth is at 1.5%, the...


  3. says:

    2.0 Feels like loose stitching of previous reportingKyusik and I have this thing about journalists throwing a bunch of articles together to make some money on the sideyet we or at least I continue to pick up books on interesting topics only to be disappointed when the same thing happens.Well, chalk another one up Zielenziger didn t even try to hide this from us The primary piece of evidence is how frequently he repeats sharing the very same interesting facts and clearly writing them as they are included for the first time e.g provides definitions, analogies Some examples of his repetition that I can recall now that juku are so called cram schools that Japan is a maternal society whereas Western societies are paternal that a particular liquor drunk frequently by businessmen is like vodka that Japanese men list sleeping as their 1 weekend activity that South Korea has far fewer hokikomori than Japan in part because of Korea s compulsory military service at majority that during the 19th century, Western traders were isolated Deshima, the island off Nagasaki where a fabulous novel, T...


  4. says:

    This book touched on nearly every Japanese socio cultural ill that has plagued my mind since I began living here Scathing in every dimension, often backed by insightful research and careful observations, the author paints a truer picture of Japan than most books While much of the book delves into the Hikikomori phenomenon shut ins, those who seclude themselves from society for a variety of reasons , many elements of social interaction in modern Japanese life are discussed It makes for an enthralling read, even frightening in its portrayal of the levels of dysfunction that follow each Japanese person from the cradle to the grave.One of the interesting points made, and one central to its thesis, is the idea of social trust Essentially, Zielenziger argues that because of Japan s rather agnostic sense of spirituality Shinto with accents of Buddhism , modern Japanese are extremely hesitant to reach out to the other whether that be those in different social circles or the neighbor next door This isolating pattern is seen everywhere, from the groups that are formed in school, to the workplace, and the family Breaking free of these imposed group relationships is nearly impossible to do, and dangerous for those who try.Most of these shut ins who stay locked in their rooms sometimes for several decades, find this psychic break from the group to be the root of their troubles Many of these Hikikomori stories begin with the person being dub...


  5. says:

    This book provides essential insight into Japan s mindset as a country of largely homogeneous citizens who still trust only those in their closest circles and its younger generation s struggle to find their place in a banquet with too few seats and too strict a dress code What happens when democracy is forced onto a nation that has not fought for its rights What happens when bullying becomes an accepted form of social feedback and women are given the same tests as men, only to enter into an adulthood of limited choices What happens to a country founded on stable employment when the jobs no longer last a lifetime Zieelenziger does confront intriguing and necessary questions about a nation in turmoil that insists on maintaining a placid front I only wish the book were better organized and less lumped together, as it often seemed, that Zielenziger had laid out in the beginning why boys and girls have tended to take drastically different solutions to the crisis in their schooling, and perhaps even begun by giving us the historical foundation for the current social crises he reports, instead of leaving this analysis to the end The answer of how to weave together the present dilemma among Japan s youth and adult population and the historical underpinnings of the crisis remains uncertain Most books provide a glimpse of the crisis, then provide the history, then delve back into the individual cont...


  6. says:

    I read this book hoping for an account of the hikikomori, the estimated one million young Japanese men who withdraw from society so completely that many of them literally do not leave their bedrooms for years at a time And for the first few chapters, that s what Shutting Out the Sun is about However, rather than dig into the details of these isolated lives, Zielenziger spends the rest of the book trying to explain the roots of the hikikomori phenomenon through broad, structural analysis of Japanese society And he does this, by the way, while sounding like a parody of a Western chauvinist If all you knew about Japan came from this book, you d think all Japanese people were alcoholic, suicidal robots, and that their society was days away from total collapse Zielenziger spends the entire book unfavorably comparing aspects of Japanese society to ...


  7. says:

    I enjoyed this book, with one complaint All the information in the book comes from Zeilenziger or someone he interviews telling us how it is There are very few statistics or hard facts anywhere, and that makes it difficult for me to imagine or care about the world Zeilenziger describes However, it sounds like Japan s secretive attitude forces that sort of writing.Japan faces a host of weird social issues, made incredible by the coupling of an unbelievably rigid society with a difficult past You can find that one sentence summary in any other review The book itself adds details which first seemed reasonable, then incredible, then fantastic, after which point my mind could stretch no further yet things kept getting weirder.If the theories espoused within the book really describe Japan, then the Japanese culture must bend its group of our species about as far away from the main branch as it can while remaining Homo Sapiens Through the book I kept waiting for Zeilenzeiger to mention how the Japanese culture causes certain unusual genes to be expressed or...


  8. says:

    While this book started off fascinating for me, by the end I was struggling to complete it The information on the hikikomori were fascinating, as was much of the history, but I felt that by the end, the author drifted so far away from the hikikomori side of the book, I couldn t remember why he was discussing the issues that he was For a long time, probably half the book, the author discusses not only Japanese history and religion, but Korean history and religion, and compares the two He does analyze why Japan has hikikomori whereas South Korea doesn t, despite their similarities.I would have also liked to have learned information on the parasite women of Japan I know if I lived there that I would be considered one It is hard to believe that even today, in the modern age, women are treated essentially as second class citizens It s no wonder why many women choose to ...


  9. says:

    I enjoyed the first 1 3rd of this book, but as soon as it fell into the only way to save Japan is through Christianity , I was so put off, I could barely finish it While I agree with a lot of what the a...


  10. says:

    I do not typically read non fiction reading is less of a chance to learn and of a chance to escape Reading is slightly mentally stimulating than, say, watching a movie or surfing the Internet, but the purpose is the same I would rather read of the fictional adventures of a character or group of characters than to observe the what s what of real life Even so, I would have been a total idiot to overlook Zielenziger s book on the basis of, my tiny exhausted undergrad brain cannot handle it As an Asian Studies Japanese Studies major and a psychology geek, the subject of this book hit all my buttons It took me forever to finish it I started in the beginning of January and only just managed to finish the book, right at the start of April It is a dense read, and it s not easy Zielenziger is clear in his words, being a journalist, but clarity only gets one so far For example, much of the book s economic explanations were lost on me, simply because I know nothing about economics Sometimes the book felt like a chore to read and by the middle it was less about hikikomori and about business and economic history As someone with very little prior knowledge of economics and someone who wasn t even alive in Japan s heyday, these parts of the book though relevant made things somewhat hard to follow and confusing Even so, the book offers an in depth look at the psyche of Japan s hikikomori and the psyche of Japanes...


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Shutting Out the Sun: How Japan Created Its Own Lost Generation Adolescenti Che Si Barricano Nella Propria Stanza E Non Ne Escono Per Anni, Abbandonando Gli Studi, Navigando E Giocando On Line E Mantenendosi Con Lavoretti Via Web, Vivendo Di Cibo Spazzatura Ordinato Per Telefono O Lasciandosi Morire Di Fame Giovani Che, Se Ragazze, Non Vogliono Allontanarsi Dalla Famiglia D Origine Ma Restare In Casa Servite E Accudite Come Principesse, Il Matrimonio O Una Possibile Prole Considerati Peggio Che Inutili Giovani Che, Soprattutto Maschi, Si Rintanano Per Mesi In Giganteschi Internet Caf Con Tanto Di Brande E Pasti In Pronta Consegna Questo, In Giappone Il Disgusto Per Un Mondo Esterno Sempre Pi Veloce E Una Societ Sempre Pi Competitiva, Il Chiudersi In Un Bozzolo Fino A Un Improbabile Guarigione Spontanea O, Pi Di Frequente, Fino All Ospedalizzazione Coatta O Al Suicidio Sta Per Arrivando Anche In America E In Europa, A Partire Dai Paesi Del Nord Svezia, Finlandia E Danimarca In Testa Team Internazionali Di Psichiatri E Sociologi Si Sorprendono A Studiare E A Definire Una Sindrome Per Lungo Tempo Limitata E Occasionale, Quella Dello Shut In Del Recluso , Che Sta Mutando Ed Espandendosi Rispetto All Originale Hikikomori Giapponese Letteralmente, Il Confinato , Il Chiamato Fuori Da Michael Zielenziger, Il Corrispondente Di Un Agenzia Stampa Che Da Tokyo Ha Fatto Conoscere Per Primo Ai Lettori Occidentali Il Fenomeno Hikikomori, Il Ritratto Di Un Oriente Che Sta Cambiando E Del Resto Del Mondo Che Sembra Destinato A Seguirlo, Lungo Una Strada Della Quale Ancora Non Si Conosce L Uscita.