Omegapiste ePUB Ê Hardcover


  • Hardcover
  • 136 pages
  • Omegapiste
  • Don DeLillo
  • Finnish
  • 12 March 2015

10 thoughts on “Omegapiste

  1. David David says:

    Yes, for sure, in this slender little volume especially in the first half , you ll find Don DeLillo at his most obtusely self parodic You see, DeLillo now apparently culls all of his dialogue from some strange dimly lit alternate universe where stubbornly humorless men and women sit around drinking scotch and waving their arms in the general direction of infinity as a vague, portentous symbol of futility in the face of everythingness This, certainly, is simultaneously DeLillo s shorthand a Yes, for sure, in this slender little volume especially in the first half , you ll find Don DeLillo at his most obtusely self parodic You see, DeLillo now apparently culls all of his dialogue from some strange dimly lit alternate universe where stubbornly humorless men and women sit around drinking scotch and waving their arms in the general direction of infinity as a vague, portentous symbol of futility in the face of everythingness This, certainly, is simultaneously DeLillo s shorthand and shortcoming If only his shuttle craft would quit orbiting the earth once in a while and land on its prosaic soil Yes, I will admit that he s responsible for some of the most jaw droppingly magical sentences in the history of the English language sentences which simply and precisely allude to the most indefinable and inexplicable of human experiences and sensations, but holy shit, Don Sometimes you need to a let a character break wind or talk about how much he laughed watching Paul Blart or something And I don t appreciate the reference to Sokurov s film Russian Ark which, as you should well know, I hate , and yet that film suffers from the same malady as some of your novels terminal self seriousness and ludicrous ponderousness Check out just a few examples from Point Omega 1 Human perception is a saga of created reality But we were devising entities beyond the agreed upon limits of recognition and interpretation 2 Day turns to night eventually but it s a matter of light and darkness, it s not passing time, mortal time There s none of the usual terror It s different here, time is enormous, that s what I feel here, palpably Time that precedes and survives us 3 Cities were built to measure time, to remove time from nature These passages would be mitigated somewhat if they were third person narration, but no They re examples of actual character dialogue Can you even believe it Don t invite DeLillo to your dinner parties He ll be trying to discuss the enfolding nature of time while everyone is eating Chex mix and trying to catch up on The Biggest Loser.AND YET AND YET I really, really liked this book a lot Despite the aforementioned problems It s really a powerful little book, and about a third of the way in, it really sucks you into its dreamlike spell or torpor One of my favorite things in art is intentional ambiguity see also Bergman s Persona and Lynch s Mulholland Drive , and Point Omega is a mostly succinctly despondent reverie on the opacity of human experience and our ultimately futile misalignment with the profound and tireless workings of time Okay, that was a pathetic attempt to parody DeLillo s ponderousness, but I invite Scribner to blurb that line on the jacket of all future editions of Point Omega


  2. Greg Greg says:

    Last night at work a man who looked like Zizek approached the information desk Him, I m looking for the section on culture process Me, what do you mean Him, how can I say this insert vague European accent , pause , yes, i m looking for, pause, looking like he is thinking , books about, pause, look of satisfaction on his face , the process of culture.That answer cleared up all my confusions, right He continued to speak down to me and explain that he was making a syllabus for a class and th Last night at work a man who looked like Zizek approached the information desk Him, I m looking for the section on culture process Me, what do you mean Him, how can I say this insert vague European accent , pause , yes, i m looking for, pause, looking like he is thinking , books about, pause, look of satisfaction on his face , the process of culture.That answer cleared up all my confusions, right He continued to speak down to me and explain that he was making a syllabus for a class and that tonight he was going to create his bibliography Since I was obviously an intellectual ingrate who doesn t know what culture process means, he let me know that a bibliography is a list of books I imagine this man speaking normally like the characters, especially the aging intellectual Elster, in Point Omega He could say, The true life is not reducible to words spoken or written, not by anyone, ever The true life takes place when we re alone, thinking, feeling, lost in memory, dreamingly self aware, the submicroscopic moments He said thisthan once, Elster did, inthan one way His life happened, he said, when he sat staring at a blank wall, thinking about dinner An eight hundred page biography is nothingthan dead conjecture, he said I almost believed him when he said such things He said we do this all the time, all of us, we become ourselves beneath the running throughts nd dim images, wondering idly when we ll die This is how we live and think whether we know it or not These are the unsorted thoughts we have looking out the train window, small dull smears of meditative panicDavid Kowalski, in his review, points out the artificiality of the dialog And he s right The dialog is stilted, sort of in the way the dialog of a Hal Hartley movie would sound if Jacques Lacan helped with the rewrite I have known people that speak like this They speak as if Derrida were the screenwriter for the movie adaptation of their life, which they were important enough to have scored the starring role in The people who can speak in this manner are privileged to live their lives as children They can say that real life is in some paradoxical nether region because they are children who don t have to live in the real world This is an age old ivory tower criticism But this book is aboutthan just pointing at the absurdity of certain types of pompous thoughts and attitudes The Elster character is not just an intellectual, but one that had been hired by the Pentagon to help with the war in Iraq Elster is a Baudrillard type of intellectual and some of the words used in Point Omega point towards the now dead French theorist Paroxysm is one of those words Elster s job in the Pentagon was as a post modern theorist who thought he could create new realities by creating new phrases to describe them If one can believe Baudrillard s triptych of essays about the first Gulf War The Gulf War x where x will not happen, is not happening, did not happen , then why can we not just say that the War in Iraq is won Or that it is over, even if it is not, since it will be the words that create the reality, not the reality that will need to be represented by the words This type of intellectualism often gets disparaged as being relativistic, and now is not the place to go into the merits of this kind of critique Instead, of being a criticism of the ethical standpoint of a left wing intellectual who has sided with that he calls, a criminal enterprise, it is about the personal standpoint of the intellectual when real life comes crashing in to his theories Everything DeLillo shows in this character borders on the ridiculous, except for the way that he treats his daughter While going on a trip to the grocery store he will test and ramble on about the objective status of the GPS thing in his car but make sure to tell his daughter to buckle her seatbelt Elster can ramble on about some esoteric bullshit in almost every scene we see him in but then show him taking a concrete delight in cooking for his daughter and wanting to share this life sustaining event with her But then something happens to her, and Elster goes from being a fountain of lofty liquid bullshit to being inconsolably human Framing the story of Elster, his daughter and the filmmaker narrator is the story of a man obsessed with watching 24 Hour Psycho the movie Psycho slowed down so that it takes 24 hours to watch the entire movie at MOMA The two stories converge to a degree that DeLillo leaves to the readers imagination The thoughts of the man watching the movie everyday while the other visitors of the museum pass by the video installation quickly, without taking the time that he is taking to see the reality can be juxtaposed with Elster s with questions about the validity appropriateness of their respective thoughts are There is a lot happening in this short and sparse book Normally, I don t re read a book immediately after finishing it I re read this book, and since finishing it a second time I ve picked it up to read five or ten page sections wherever I would open the book to This is not something I normally do There is something going on in the book that I still haven t been able to pinpoint in the text I ve actually been considering buying a copy of it, the copy I ve been reading is borrowed from the library It is the kind of book that begs to be underlined and have marginalia added to it It is the kind of book that needs to be engaged with, and have the meaning pried out of the words on the page Not too much really happens in the novel, but it is a muchinteresting read than White Noise and while less of a page turner than Libra it is arguably aimportant novel


  3. brian brian says:

    let s get past the fact that don delillo is kind of a dickhead for allowing us to pay 24 for a 117 pg novella and get to the point it s worth it twenty four bucks for a whiff of the ineffable we ll take itConsciousness is exhausted Back now to inorganic matter This is what we want We want to be stones in a fieldso speaks richard elster, 73 yr old cog in the american war machine, pining and praying for the extinction of the human race, asking to be zapped back to the stardust we all let s get past the fact that don delillo is kind of a dickhead for allowing us to pay 24 for a 117 pg novella and get to the point it s worth it twenty four bucks for a whiff of the ineffable we ll take itConsciousness is exhausted Back now to inorganic matter This is what we want We want to be stones in a fieldso speaks richard elster, 73 yr old cog in the american war machine, pining and praying for the extinction of the human race, asking to be zapped back to the stardust we all were only a few years back could there be a collective yearning way beyond our genes, deep in our atomic makeup, a yearning to cycle back to inanimate primordial muck ok as pretentious and irritating as this may sound, it s also kind of deeply fascinating most thrilling is the novel s framing device, the best piece of art criticism ever written clement greenberg, guillaume apollinaire, john ruskin, harold rosenberg bunch of pikers suckers y see, not only does delillo turn what should be a somewhat dull art piece into some seriously suspenseful mindfuckery, but he offers the answers to the secrets of the universe yes the nature of time and existence are damn near explained and there s the joke, people all this talk of extinction and the species running its course point omega is the omega point after the completion of this book we, as humans, have it all figured out, done what we hadda do, missing link is linked now, get us out of here well, not really but it sure as shit feels as if delillo was writing well into, and for, the apocalypse we open on an unnamed guy hanging around an actual installation at the MOMA in 2006 called 24 Hour Psycho, in which the scottish artist douglas gordon slowed down hitch s masterpiece so that its original 2 hours now takes 24 and it s thrilling to read delillo s slooooowed down take on watching a sloooowed down filmTo see what s here, finally to look and to know you re looking, to feel time passing, to be alive to what is happening in the smallest registerin less certain terms you slow shit down and weird stuff happens and then we move to the core of the novel whose edges, although they might not appear, lock directly into the framing device and it s weird stuff warhol s empire by way of beckett we follow a young filmmaker as he moves in to a defense official from the bush administration s desert getaway in the hope of convincing the older man to be the subject of a documentary they sit around in silence until the old guy s daughter arrives and then things get shaken up slightly very very slightly y see, the structure and pacing of delillo s novella, of course, mirrors the character s talks on the nature of time but there s a lifelessness to this section and though this may be the point, it makes little difference, because toward the end, we re called or should be called to feel something after talk of time and extinction and eternity and the dual lumbering monsters of war and nation, the loss of a single person is what equals is greater than the death of the universe the micro and macro, the quantum universal all are bested by loss and we retain our humanity.lemme be straight i m a delillo freak the guy puts me in another world or,accurately, forces me to reconfigure this world on different terms no easy task for me, his books define the last days of the 20th century as powerfully as did dostoevsky s for 19th century st petersburg and a part of the strategy, his means of defining our time, is a defamiliarization of the familiar the world, reality, is strange stuff a point most people overlook and delillo creates totems and icons and magic out of the ordinary and zaps the pious into the ranks of the banal and although i d like to tell y all to approach this book as a kind of delilloesque fever dream, to allow its simultaneous strangeness and corniness and ponderousness and profundity and beauty and portentousness to just wash over, to just take it all in it wouldn t be genuine there s much here, but there s also something lacking and while i genuinely love that delillo in his post underworld novels has metamorphosed, i don t think he s quite nailed it but point omega is the closest he s come if douglas gordon can rip the concept for the tv show 24 , apply it to psycho, and have delillo creaming his jeans why stop there how about a 24 version of remembrance of things past war in peace in 24 hours why stop with art let s 24 history seven day war in 24 hours thirty year war in 24 hours somebody call joel surnow


  4. Steven Godin Steven Godin says:

    It s hardly a surprise to me that I surface from another Don DeLillo novel feeling faintly unsettled and disoriented This can be seen as both a blessing and a curse throughout much of his fiction, and the reason he can be such a compelling writer in one book, and such a frustrating one in another I ve loved two of his novels, but didn t think much of two others, and for me, Point Omega sits somewhere in the middle This short novel had a hypnotic feel to it, and is told with a prose that is bo It s hardly a surprise to me that I surface from another Don DeLillo novel feeling faintly unsettled and disoriented This can be seen as both a blessing and a curse throughout much of his fiction, and the reason he can be such a compelling writer in one book, and such a frustrating one in another I ve loved two of his novels, but didn t think much of two others, and for me, Point Omega sits somewhere in the middle This short novel had a hypnotic feel to it, and is told with a prose that is both rigorous and precise, but the story was also somewhat baffling at times It starts with a showing of 24 Hour Psycho a heavily slowed down screening of Hitchcock s film that was exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in 2006 The piece is being intensely watched by an unnamed narrator who observes, but the narrator turns out to be a cipher in what becomes a prologue It s a pair the narrator spots in the gallery, and wrongly assumes to be a film professor and student, who turn out to be the protagonists Richard Elster, an ageing defence intellectual who advised over Iraq, and Jim Finley, an idealistic young director who wants to make a film of Elster talking uninterruptedly about his work.We then cut to the Californian desert, where a feeling of slow motion sets in, as the two men reflect on deep subjects such as time, extinction, and the attainment of what philosopher Teilhard de Chardin called the Omega Point a zen like state of relinquished consciousness, and of course the open desert landscape that is beautifully evoked is conducive to such thoughts Briefly the novel becomes a thriller towards the end, after Elster s daughter Jessie, who comes to stay goes missing, but the real quarry here isn t the solution to the mystery so much as the anguish and anxiety that it arouses While the main plot dithers around without really getting anywhere, on a deeper level this is very much about lateness lateness in life, time to reflect, hindsight, fear, loss It is also something of an object lesson in the methods of late phase literature, where the high gloss productions of the imagination in full spate gives way to a sparser, grainier art of suggestion and juxtaposition I liked it, but it s not peak DeLillo It seems at the turn of the century he started to go downhill somewhat, but that won t put me off readingof his later novels, as as a writer he has always found a way to lure me in, whether he s on top form or not


  5. Lilo Lilo says:

    You may call me uneducated, ignorant, unappreciative, or a philistine, I ll still say that I hated this book I only finished it because I refused to believe that it would not come to any point, be it point Omega or any other point After I finished reading the book, I felt that I should sue the author for stealing my valuable time, charging 100 an hour because this would be the absolute minimum someone would have to pay me for reading this book a second time And this would have been a ba You may call me uneducated, ignorant, unappreciative, or a philistine, I ll still say that I hated this book I only finished it because I refused to believe that it would not come to any point, be it point Omega or any other point After I finished reading the book, I felt that I should sue the author for stealing my valuable time, charging 100 an hour because this would be the absolute minimum someone would have to pay me for reading this book a second time And this would have been a bargain for the author, as come to think of it, I wouldn t do it for twice the money If I only think what I could have done with the time I wasted on this book I could have read a book that was worthwhile reading, I could have taken the dogs for walks, I could have pulled weeds in the garden, I could have done some housecleaning ANYTHING would have madesense and would have beenenjoyable even cleaning litterboxes


  6. Ademption Ademption says:

    Consider me the Bizarro David MK He doesn t like poor people and their B.O Contrarian contrarian that I am, I don t like whiny rich people who are so jaded they drone on about the ineffability of everything, and how no one is really sure of anything ever, and you can t cross the same river twice and so on.Elster, a defense intellectual, picked for his mean liberal arts skills, is one such man Fuck, if that s what it takes, the DOJ should give me a job I m a renaissance man with a liberal art Consider me the Bizarro David MK He doesn t like poor people and their B.O Contrarian contrarian that I am, I don t like whiny rich people who are so jaded they drone on about the ineffability of everything, and how no one is really sure of anything ever, and you can t cross the same river twice and so on.Elster, a defense intellectual, picked for his mean liberal arts skills, is one such man Fuck, if that s what it takes, the DOJ should give me a job I m a renaissance man with a liberal arts degree It is implied that he helped contrive the jingoism for Iraq II, trying to make it a haiku war, creating facts from nothing and brainwashing the populace into an undulating 24 hour news channel wargasm He is self centered, completely oblivious to those who die and to those who repeat his empty propaganda He plays abstract games and goes about his life until he meets a prosaic personal tragedy that undoes him.There is also a documentary filmmaker, Finley, but he is merely an eye to observe Elster And Elster s daughter also makes an appearance She s self absorbed too, broken in fact She just floats about, trapped miles below her own skin, doing whatever it is that she does, walking this way and that Her dad thinks her quirks are complex in the way that Cameron Diaz s characters think their cross purpose yammering substitutes for complex see Amanda from The Holiday for a prime example Elster s Russian ex wife makes an appearance via phone conversations, and Delillo gets her accent and stilted grammar pitch perfect The ex wife, she s my favorite She s the best flat character in the parade I hated Elster so much, because he is weak He isn t weak because personal tragedy undoes him He s weak because he is amoral, willing to harm nameless others, not responsible for his key role in a bureaucratic process that hurts many, and then isn t the super man all the way down the guy ordinarily skipping on a road paved with other people s necks when something rather commonplace happens to him He is hard and emotionless, reptilian, until he feels pain Master of the universe, and titan in his own mind, until he bumps into an emotional reality I want my coldblooded, self styled badasses to stay unrepentant, true to their uncaring form like Anton Chigurh or Lilah Morgan Elster reminds me of a few guys I ve worked with The amalgam of these guys would be someone wearing death metal t shirts of gore and pain, willing to be theoretically cruel to outsourced teams as long as he wasn t actually implementing the policies he had a hand in crafting, not directly telling departments to work harder for less, instead having digital tools and support staff play the intermediary for him, ever ready to break the rules of the social contract and hide in bureaucracy to get things done faster and cheaper, insisting others play by the rules, and gleefully not following any protocols in secret Pale, thin, definitely among the first against the wall if an armed revolution came A poseur who would in no way defend himself and his actions, only point to a machine and shrug at how life sure is random in a half hearted attempt at justification Seduced by power, but too much of a scrotum to grab the reins and be the primary actor The social contract, that he is so willing to bend and twist on the sly, is the only thing keeping him on life support in civilized society Thank god, he wasn t born a Mexican, or even 70 years ago in any nation Elster is an ideal of that amalgam a self important, f ted coward who gets to wax lyrical all day about the nothingingness of everything, which better serves as an unconscious critique of his personal character.That said, Delillo can write The plot is besides the point It reminds me of Murakami s Sputnik Sweetheart a novella where so much Nothing happens that it eventually reaches a critical warp where something actually does occur It is rather confusing, having this something leap out of Nothing, but then Nothing descends again covering everything in blankness There are no explanations or satisfactory resolutions It is Delillo s sentences that make this book worthwhile He crafts some beauties about the unknowability of knowability and the limits of human knowledge, time, space, heat, light, and death epic sentences The guy could talk about the horror of waiting in line for his healthcard or renewing his plates at the DMV, and I d want to read and nod, and say Yes, Don You have your pen on the pulse of this age, and you also manage to make the dull roar of it sound entertaining His sentences are granite That s how I read this book, checking out the sentences, cocking my head, blinking, re reading them, and marveling at his huge looming boulders.I m giving in Point Omega 3 stars, because it is such a short book, the plot is nonexistent, and there are no real characters besides Elster Maybe it is time for Delillo to writeplays or try his hand at essays He s gotten so spare, there are only sentences to go on


  7. Jason Jason says:

    ATTENZIONE, ATENCI N, ATTENTION First time reader of Don DeLillo At the library kiosk labelled New Arrivals 2010, Point Omega s snazzy purple pink dustcover called out loudly to passersby with its nicely centered, infinity icon and bold raised print It was shiny, crisp, and industriously stamped in solid black Jan 2010 on the pages top edge I snatched it up as soon as another returned it to the inclined sill, probably its first day in circulation, drawing immediate attention I mi ATTENZIONE, ATENCI N, ATTENTION First time reader of Don DeLillo At the library kiosk labelled New Arrivals 2010, Point Omega s snazzy purple pink dustcover called out loudly to passersby with its nicely centered, infinity icon and bold raised print It was shiny, crisp, and industriously stamped in solid black Jan 2010 on the pages top edge I snatched it up as soon as another returned it to the inclined sill, probably its first day in circulation, drawing immediate attention I missed the fine print next to it on orange card stock that cautioned, only for loyal fansvery loyal I ve never read Don DeLillo before, but his newer publications extol him as the winner of the National Book Award, the PEN Faulkner Award for Fiction, the Jerusalem Prize, and the American Academy of Arts Letters William Dean Howells Medal How could I go wrong with a 117 page novella from the author that inspired the youngest generation of serious writers of fiction I suspect it s me that went wrong When scouting an author that s new to me dammit I know this I should select a seasoned, time tested, award winner like White Noise or Libra or Underworld Instead, I believe Point Omega is a book most appropriately called a filler What s a filler First, it s a short book that intermittently fills the publication time between longer novels DeLillo consistently publishes about every 3 years, 12 months or one standard deviation His last book was published May 2007, so Jan 2010 is within 3 yrs, 12 mos You can expect his next book early 2013, one standard deviation He s been very consistent with this publication interval since 1971 Second, his next book will undoubtedly be longer than 117 pages his shortest book ever , probablytypical in length of his award winning novels in the 80s 90s, which are around 250 pages If so, then Point Omega has productively filled the space between his normal length publications Third, a filler is that mid career book, say the 13th or 14th or 15th, in a prolific career when the author, frankly, gets bored with his normal fare and tries stretching his award winning themes and attributes in common vectors, along similar veins, but to such a tenuous almost absurd dimension that the subject matter becomes almost concept writing, or writing that s experimental This is indeed his fifteenth novel, and we all expect him to continue writing, so it s reasonable that DeLillo is at the mid point in his career Also, the concept of Point Omega is wicked esoteric, and it s bereft of the common mile markers of normal writing that, for me, helps root a novel to earth, placing it into the family of novels that you can explain clearly to your friends This book does not lend itself to easy explanation Fourth, filler books win no awards I tell you now, with only my small Goodreads library and 40 years of reading experience, that Point Omega will win no awards Nothing It was ground out like scrap meat for sausage in those old, cast iron, hand cranked meat grinders And like that ground meat, you can t quite tell its original cut, shape, form, or function Fifth, a filler is forgettable Like in acting, it s the movie a major star appears in that goes straight to DVD, and you re like That s Michael CaineI never heard of that movie When DeLillo s career is over, this book will not measure into his top 10, maybe not even the top half I m justified in making this prediction without having read any other DeLillo because I ve read many National Book Award novels, know the quality of their writing, and can make a reasonable call You can too if you ve been a reader all your life Bold predictions Yes Course, I could be wrong and have, stupidly, missed something I was intrigued by the dustcover description of the protagonist, Elster, a defense intellectual involved in the management of the country s war machineand such matters as troop deployments and counterinsurgencies I m in the military and have been involved in tactical level management of the country s war machine and troop deployments I m not an intellectual by any means, but 20 years of school, 2 Masters, and years of Professional Military Education I was looking forward to tangible similarities between me and Elster No Nothing of the sort DeLillo immediately wigged out into a kind of short sentenced esoteric existentialism that had me wondering what s this about, what s there to like about any of these characters, and what am I learning here Abutted between 2 bookend chapters, called Anonymity 1 2 which take place on successive days , there is a story of several months Jim Finley wants to shoot a documentary of Elster against a wall, talking, ostensibly, about all the Top Secret issues involved with his employment at the Pentagon Hey, I ve signed, co signed, witnessed, and co witnessed all the DoD Forms that order me not to talk about details of my job for 99 years, and Elster was probably levels of classification higher than me So, yeah, first flashing BS warning light Elster plays the shaman He makes Jim search for the answers to his own questions in tangential, staccato rejoinders Nothing is on the surface, nothing straight from Elster for over a month in his austere getaway south of north Arizona Additionally, a girl arrives, she stays awhile, then disappears No documentary, no backstory, no answers, nothing about Elster s employment Maybe this is how DeLillo writes He makes you hunt for meaning DeLillo probably has a niche audience Maybe he s the kind of author that w_a_r_p_s his writing so far back upon itself that standard literary customs shatter and you look for meaning reflected, twisted, distorted from the broken pieces around you It s writing whose theme is in such redux, that like overly boiled soup you can t separate the products and get a fix on a single ingredient Are these carrots or bok choy, are these onions or cabbage, is this a potato In the book is hidden too deeply for me a rumination of time and space The austerity of the desert and the stark geologic formations are supposed to add depth to the questions Jim and Elster are seeking Alas, like a furrowed gulch unchanged for eons, there are no answers for time, and no time in answers, or so it goes I m sure there s a theme of immutability and conscience and relativity and cosmology among the sun scorched environs, but I didn t learn anything about it Lesson 3 in Writing 101 leave readers with some questions to ponder, but don t overwhelm them by deconstructing deconstructionism, making the writing an answer unto itself If you do, then you better be a damn good writer This, to me, was not damn good writing it was concept writing On several occasions, I was reading and, honestly, forgot that I was reading The characters were null, the narration unsavory, the denouement too mysterious, the subject too interstellar, dissociative, out of body There s a curious Acknowledgement at the rear of the book, 2 sentences, and it directly influences the bookend chapters DeLillo was so inspired by a 1993 videowork screened in New York in 2006, that this videowork is the basis of the intro and conclusion of Point Omega It threads together DeLillo s riddle of time and space, and our characters talk about it in the middle of the book Unusual, I think, to so directly derive and attribute the substance of your own work based on another s I was going to insert here something mean like Point Omega reminds me of Out, out brief candle c, c, c, struts and frets his hour upon the stage, c, c, c, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing But it really doesn t deserve that I make it a rule never to read reviews until after I write my own, then I wolf down as many as I can in about 15 minutes Baby, I hope I find something I overlooked, because I really want those 3 hours back to re invest in DeLillo s other book I checked out, Underworld So, yes, I m giving him another chance But, it s one of his earlier books when he was moving among Book Awards instead of orbiting away from them New words none


  8. MJ Nicholls MJ Nicholls says:

    This flirtation with DeLillo is leading nowhere That moment of elation when one imagines someone is nurturing amorous intentions behind their flirting towards you, but is flirting for the fun of flirting and nurturing ideas to call up ten other people who aren t you instead, despite your sleepless nights of dreams and delights That, Don That.


  9. Peter Peter says:

    Hyper abstract intellectualization Overly ruminative prose peppered with mysterious and incomplete sentences Pages of characters projecting thoughts onto others Ugh.I get what DeLillo is going for in Point Omega the environments that we create and choose to inhabit blind us and remind us of what makes up every millisecond of our human existence And, the relationships and events of our lives thrust us inevitably forward, into and through the importance and significance of now This is a nice Hyper abstract intellectualization Overly ruminative prose peppered with mysterious and incomplete sentences Pages of characters projecting thoughts onto others Ugh.I get what DeLillo is going for in Point Omega the environments that we create and choose to inhabit blind us and remind us of what makes up every millisecond of our human existence And, the relationships and events of our lives thrust us inevitably forward, into and through the importance and significance of now This is a nice revelation to have.But one line perhaps best sums up why DeLillo s treatment of this idea doesn t work for me the narrator s wife, in a gentle criticism of the narrator s film work, asks, Why is it so hard to be serious, so easy to be too serious Reading Point Omega, I feel DeLillo is, like in Falling man, too serious about his subject, too self conscious and self indulgent And also, that comma without the conjunction in the middle of the quote whose mother speaks like that So the story Defense Department intellectual Richard Elster flees from the city and immerses himself in the vast and vacant land and skyscape of the desert southwest He seeks perspective and escape Young filmmaker Jim Finley visits him there to persuade him to make a one take, no cut documentary interview Before long, Elster s daughter, Jessie, arrives and a new dynamic opens up between the three of them Bookending this action are two scenes from an art exhibit obsessively frequented by an anonymous fourth character and visited once by Richard and Jim, and another time by Jessie.The mind moves fast and furiously in these scenes in Point Omega, but, in the name of economy or self indulgence , it leaves the prose in scraps behind We re thrown quizzical contradictions like It was like bricks in a wall, clearly countable, not like the flight of an arrow or bird Then again it was not like or unlike anything Or Meaningless, he thought or maybe not And other times we re left pondering chapter starters like Every lost moment is the life Intentional vagueness and self conscious profundity really rub me the wrong way.Equally maddening is when characters spend pages fabricating other characters thoughts and personality especially when it s painfully, painfully obvious that the imagineer is wrong and borderline insane the helpless and anonymous fourth character, a man at a museum who lingers for hours every day watching and contemplating the film Psycho played in super slow motion, fantasizes about the thoughts and personalities of the people who enter and leave and we are forced to follow his twisted thought Argh Argh Argh Argh Argh Instead of groaning, perhaps I should choose instead to give DeLillo credit for capturing the man s instability DeLillo says that the idea for the novel came from watching this exhibit repeatedly at the MoMA I hope the character in the novel is an exaggeration, and not a mirror, of his own thoughts Overall, it seems that everyone is in search of something in Point Omega, and no one quite gets there We and the characters are pulled away from the omega point, when time slows down and understanding is complete, by the people and action around us I respect this, but I wish that the experience of achieving this understanding could have beenpleasurable.Do I recommend it For DeLillo enthusiasts and serial music fansWould I teach it Shockingly, maybe It s short, and full of stuff.Related texts Falling ManLasting Impression Stylized reflection on the acceleration and deceleration of time and knowledge.Postscript Note I m about to perform an act of literary blasphemy and talk about sports Don t hate on me I have not seen Douglas Gordon s installation, 24 Hour Psycho, but I did see the Superbowl, and the super slow motion clips of wide receivers and defensive backs running and colliding serve equally well for demonstrating the thousands of mental calculations the human mind makes every second, and therefore encouraging us to consider time and thought in new ways The most relevant difference, I imagine, is that 24 Hour Psycho is the result of careful calculation and artful construction, while sporting events are the result of athletic improvisation Nonetheless, as an insight into what we see and don t see in our behavior, I think the result is the same


  10. J. Kent Messum J. Kent Messum says:

    I ve tried to get into Don DeLillo a few times, mostly because I often see him listed among a general shortlist of other writers I greatly admire But for the life of me, I can t understand why he shares the podium with clearly better talents Maybe I just haven t read the right stuff by him yet.That s not to say DeLillo is a bad writer Far from it His prose is generally quite smooth, and the subject matter intelligent But the books I ve tried smack of that peculiar brand of somewhat subtle h I ve tried to get into Don DeLillo a few times, mostly because I often see him listed among a general shortlist of other writers I greatly admire But for the life of me, I can t understand why he shares the podium with clearly better talents Maybe I just haven t read the right stuff by him yet.That s not to say DeLillo is a bad writer Far from it His prose is generally quite smooth, and the subject matter intelligent But the books I ve tried smack of that peculiar brand of somewhat subtle high brow self congratulatory pride that hobbles so many other Literary Writers out there something I like to call The Problem With Being Too Literary There is a deluge of this kind of stuff on the market In pursuit of lofty literary goals, it s real easy to end up penning a fucking snoozer of a book The next step is to defend your professionally published bore by alluding to the important themes within and the fact that you were trying to do something different which should automatically make it special And that is exactly what Point Omega is It s written like a Haiku a noted theme in the novel and proves not only experimental, but also goddamn boring in the process The plot oraccurately, the non plot moves at a glacial pace and provides little to intrigue readers other than the largely reluctant dialogue between two, and later three, socially maladjusted characters Surprisingly, there is some interesting interaction between a bitter old scholar, a failed filmmaker, and an autistic young woman, but it s barely enough to keep the pages turning You might, as I did, keep reading because you re convinced something exciting or gripping is bound to happen Don t hold your breath In a review in New York Magazine, Sam Anderson said that Point Omega is the latest of a recent stretch of post Underworld metaphysical anti thrillers showing DeLillo s writing has reached a whole new level of narrative inertia That sums up my feelings quite nicely Many will maintain that a guy like Don can do no wrong I ain t buying it And I might not bother buying another of his books while I m at it It s obvious that a big name like DeLillo can plug a big hole in a sinking ship of a novel but in my opinion he can t stop it running aground


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Omegapiste[PDF / Epub] ★ Omegapiste By Don DeLillo – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk H kkeliss keskell autiomaata asuu entinen hallituksen neuvonantaja Richard Elster H n oli tiedemies ulkopuolinen ennen kuin h net kutsuttiin puolustusministeri n strategistien puheille Elsteri pyydett H kkeliss keskell autiomaata asuu entinen hallituksen neuvonantaja Richard Elster H n oli tiedemies ulkopuolinen ennen kuin h net kutsuttiin puolustusministeri n strategistien puheille Elsteri pyydettiin luomaan lyllinen viitekehys maan sotilaallisten tavoitteiden tueksi Kaksi vuotta Elster luki salaisia dokumentteja Sen j lkeen h n vet ytyi yksin isyyteenElokuvaohjaaja Jim Finley keksii tehd dokumentin Elsterist ja muuttaa asumaan t m n luo Miesten k ymiss keskusteluissa varmistuu lopulta Elsterin n kemys siit ett ihmiskunta on pakonomaisesti kulkemassa kohti Omegapistett jossa el m hiipuu olemattomuuteen V ite saa konkreettisen todisteen kun Elsterin tasapainoton tyt r saapuu vierailulle ja katoaaDon DeLillon pieni mutta vaikuttava romaani on j lleen Nobel tasoa H nen teoksensa ovat usein olleet jonkinlaisia profetioita ja uudessa arvoituksellisessa romaanissaan h n tarttuu USA n sotakoneiston salaisiin suunnitelmiin Onko tuhovietti koodattu kaikkien el vien olentojen DNA han.


About the Author: Don DeLillo

Don DeLillo is an American author best known for his novels which paint detailed portraits of American life in the late th and early st centuries He currently lives outside of New York CityAmong the most influential American writers of the past decades DeLillo has received among author awards a National Book Award White Noise a PEN Faulkner Award Mao II and an American Book Award Underworld DeLillo s sixteenth novel Point Omega was published in February .