The Way We Wore MOBI õ The Way MOBI :Ê


10 thoughts on “The Way We Wore

  1. Nigeyb Nigeyb says:

    I am not particularly fussed about clothes but thoroughly enjoyed Robert Elms' touching and wonderfully written autobiography The Way We Wore Clothes and Elms' obsession with them are lovingly chronicled in some detail With each new subculture or trend came a new look or variation on a current look Mods to skins to suedeheads to soul boys to punks etc etc If you lived through this era and have any interest then you should enjoy this book I must say I found it thoroughly absorbing but then I was an early punk and participated in the BillysBlitz scene where Robert Elms played a starring role One of the reviews on the back of the book makes a comparison with Nick Hornby's 'Fever Pitch' I think that's spot on Just as you don't need to be a fan of Arsenal FC to enjoy Hornby's book so you don't have to be a clothes horse to enjoy this book Well done Mr Elms I doff my retro velvet Stevie Wonder style hat in your direction45


  2. Tosh Tosh says:

    Robert Elms was one of the editors of the much missed FACE Magazine and here's a memoir told through his closet of sorts From Mods to new romantic this is a remarkable book and fascinating social history as well as Elm's personal story via his clothes and his brother's clothes


  3. Michael Bully Michael Bully says:

    Enjoyed the book A look at popular culture particularly fashion but takes in music and football focusing on all the major style trends from 1970 1988 that emerged in London The author highlights his own Working Class background continually Certainly very self referential but witty and keeps the reader's interest His accounts of early punk gigs Futurist clubs such as The Blitz his time at 'The Face' magazine being Sade's boyfriend and living together in a London suat when she suddenly becomes famous are entertaining As a reader I was bemused by a lot of the book Being from a Middle Class provincial background and zero interest in fashion enjoyed reading what I missed out on during these years Liked the ending when Mr Elms returns from working in Barcelona finds London taken over by Acid House and his horrified by the music and even worse the lack of dress sense


  4. Jock Crocodile Jock Crocodile says:

    Brilliantly written account of growing up in the UK and the importance of wearing the right clobber Giving a nod to Teds and Mods the book really kicks off with Skinhead and the importance of looking smart It then charts Roberts life through being a Soul Boy Punk Blitz Kid and New Romantic with many tales told along the wayFans of Roberts Radio London show I count myself among this number will have an idea of what to expect and almost hear his voice as they read itI'll give this book six months and then read it again


  5. Jock Crocodile Jock Crocodile says:

    Brilliantly written account of growing up in the UK and the importance of wearing the right clobber Giving a nod to Teds and Mods the book really kicks off with Skinhead and the importance of looking smart It then charts Roberts life through being a Soul Boy Punk Blitz Kid and New Romantic with many tales told along the wayFans of Roberts Radio London show I count myself among this number will have an idea of what to expect and almost hear his voice as they read itI'll give this book six months and then read it again


  6. Andrya Andrya says:

    The language is evocative and brilliant conjuring pictures and my own memories Taking us on his journey guided by fashion through youth styles as he followed them Mods Skin Southern Soul Punk Blitz including nods to styles he despised justifiably dismissive while contextualising Oi Skins arrogant about late 80’s ravers the lack of sharp fashion crushed his sensibilityHe pieces together history that I experienced in a detailed and exciting way


  7. Mouselegs Mouselegs says:

    Delightful A combination of memoir and sartorial history of North London between 1960s and mid 80s I am one of those that was both too young and too far away to experience this whirlwind of youthful creativity I'm now trying to think how I can get some middle aged schmutter and have a look that is just so


  8. Christopher Graham Christopher Graham says:

    The writer is my age almost to the day He used to live with Sade I didn't But our other common experiences and attitudes made this a delightful book to read


  9. Carole Tyrrell Carole Tyrrell says:

    Ah Robert Elms – he of the knife edge cheekbones the cockney patter and the glamorous girlfriend Sade He ticked all the right boxes in the ’80’s and like another ‘80’s person Chris Evans you wonder why they’re still around The 80’s when ‘style’ became the most overused word on the planet The acres of black ash furniture eye searing neon lighting cocktails with vaguely suggestive names and maybe the last gasp of youth culture and tribes I visited ‘Club to Catwalk’ at the V A on New Year’s Day and there was Mr Elms posing away on their video wall A man who was everywhere and then was nowhere Mr Elms was a social commentator and writer who coined the phrase ‘Hard Times’ chic for achingly hip style bible The Face and this book is a wander through his fascination with clothes over the years A ‘My Life with Mohair’ ‘Showroom dummy’ or perhaps ‘My Life as a Manneuin’ At the start he uotes Shakespeare’s ‘Apparel maketh the man’ and then discusses his wardrobe of suits and memories Who hasn’t been unable to throw away a favourite item of clothing because it brings back so many memories He discusses his upbringing in West London and reveals that Steptoe and Son were actually based on a real person a Notting Hill totter based in Latimer Road Arthur Arnold Elms looked up to his older brother who was a Mod the ‘60’s dandies who still live on in Bradley Wiggins A pair of Tuff Wayfinders with a compass in their heels are fondly recalled – I just about remember TV ads for them – and Oxford bags I don’t think they’ll be making a comeback soon Elms has a neat turn of phrase and made me laugh out loud at some comments Of Sid the Tricel King who sold fabrics bedding and clothes Elms claims ‘of manmade fabrics so inflammable that its customers crackled and sparked as they left the premises ‘ Obviously a man vying with Brentford Nylons Remember them Then came Bowie in 1972 and that’s when some of us became peacocks He recalls as do I Bowie’s seminal appearance on a 1972 edition of Top of the Pops when a large proportion of the young viewing audience assumed that Bowie was pointing at them and they couldn’t resist the call to arms As Elms observes ‘ Going Bowie – meant going to the back of the bus to sit on your own ‘ and for some of us that was just what we wanted Elms wore many outfits – soul boy new romantic Blitz devotee in the great fancy dress ball that was the ‘80’s This is an affectionate book written by a man who knows that he might at times sound ridiculous but it seemed a good idea to wear it at the time Mind you I don’t think batwing sweaters are due for a revivalI’m not sure that someone growing up today would be able to write such an evocative book of memories of dancing in dapper threads and the odd fashion mistake Somehow shopping at Primark just doesn’t have the same ring to it A good uplifting read and for those of us of a certain age a chance to relive the fashions of our youth


  10. Nancy Nancy says:

    I enjoyed this book a lot I grew up following the New Romantic London scene through The Face from my early teenage Central Valley California home in the early 1980s Just subscribing to The Face back then involved not only begging my mother for hard earned money hers not mine shamefully like Elms' mum mine was also all about supporting my youth culture dreams but getting international money orders drafted in Sterling at the local bank which was a real ordeal at the time Nevermind the back issue orders I would placeRobert Elms' book is an interesting reflection on personal working class identity in mid century London This is the kind of book that very clearly illustrates that clothing football and music are not merely disposable elements but political choices and personal markers of what we want to be and who we think we are I think he really captured the whole pre internet and pre credit cards thing about youth at that time too; the era when you had to work really hard to find what you wanted whether it was information or records or clothing You had to really want it and you had to feel passionate about how what you found was going to transform and transport you That seems mostly lost in many parts of the world today Let's not forget though that there are still billions of unconnected people still who don't have everything they want because of these mod consSome people have approached this book as why would this tosser care so much about clothes Have they read it It's about social and cultural markers class and race post warpostcolonial decay and in the name of Steve Dagger's label Reformation The final paragraph was perfect reading it as I am now 43 I really really recommended to anyone who knows about British youth culture in the 1960s 1980s


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The Way We Wore [Reading] ➾ The Way We Wore Author Robert Elms – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk One day in 1965 the five year old Robert Elms saw his brother return to the family council house in a petrol blue Italian cut mohair suit he'd just had made for him by a tailor in Kilburn On the recor One day in the five year old Robert Elms saw his brother return to the family council house in a petrol blue Italian cut The Way MOBI :Ê mohair suit he'd just had made for him by a tailor in Kilburn On the record player was Too Hard to Handle by Otis Reading This Robert realized was it This was what you grew up for At the age of the same kid from the slums of Notting Hill Dale found himself at the epicentre of hip London Writing for the new style bible Face his pronouncements on what to wear and what not to wear what to listen to and how to be cool dictated youth taste to the post punk generation In an era that saw style become a mainstream preoccupation Robert Elms was the high priest of a new cultThis is the story of a life's obsession It's about why you'd rather not go out at all than go out in the wrong sort of brogues and why the particular cut of your jeans really can seem to matter.

  • Hardcover
  • The Way We Wore
  • Robert Elms
  • English
  • 05 April 2014
  • 9780330420327

About the Author: Robert Elms

Robert Elms is a British writer and broadcaster Elms was a writer for The Face magazine in the s and is currently known for his The Way MOBI :Ê long running radio show on BBC London His book The Way We Wore charts the changing fashions of his own youth linking them with the social history of the times.