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Modern African Wars (2): Angola and Mozambique 1961-74 Portugal Was Both The First And The Last Of The Great European Colonial Powers For Years Portugal Had Colonies In Africa In , As Liberation Movements Swept Across Colonial Africa, The Portuguese Flag Still Flew Over Vast Expanses Of Territory Across The Continent The Spread Of Decolonization And The Establishment Of Independent States Whose Governments Were Sympathetic To The Cause Of African Nationalism Led, In The Early S, To A Series Of Wars In Angola , Guin And Mozambique This Book Details Each Of These Liberation Movements, Focusing On The Equipment, Uniforms And Organization Of The Portuguese Forces


10 thoughts on “Modern African Wars (2): Angola and Mozambique 1961-74

  1. says:

    In the second volume of Modern African Wars, Peter Abbott teamed up with Manuel Rodrigues and delivered the most balanced of the original three MAAs of the series The Portuguese rule was less oriented towards ethnic differences than the British one, and the text gives a good explanation to the Anglo Saxon reader that may blow the minds of most readers unacquainted with the Portuguesetolerant way of life Both sides are covered in an even handed approach, with a good amount of information In the second volume of Modern African Wars, Peter Abbott teamed up with Manuel Rodrigues and delivered the most balanced of the original three MAAs of the series The Portuguese rule was less oriented towards ethnic differences than the British one, and the text gives a good explanation to the Anglo Saxon reader that may blow the minds of most readers unacquainted with the Portuguesetolerant way of life Both sides are covered in an even handed approach, with a good amount of information about the Liberation Forces.The Portuguese did manage to adapt itself well to continuing warfare in three fronts, and only in Guinea did they sufferserious setbacks because of the geography with broken terrain surrounded by nations sympathetic to their nationalist cause The liberation movements were lavishly supported by the Communist bloc to the point that Portugal decided to attack Guin Conakry, who served as directorate to the PAIGC, with training camps and even providing artillery barrages to cover PAIGC incursions Portugal conducted a major amphibious operation against Guin e Conakry named Operation Green Sea to avoid another such amphibious incursion, the Soviets moved a powerful naval force to patrol Guin e Conakry s shores On Angola the Portuguese were waysuccessful, and the three liberation movements MPLA, FNLA and UNITA ended the war in a bad shape, with Portugal leaving the country without a ruler, with a civil war starting immediately afterwards In Mo ambique, the Portuguese worked together with Rhodesian forces on the north, and the FRELIMO was largely contained until the coup of 1974 Overall, Portugal had to fight an atrittion war with dwindling resources and international support, and still managed to score a respectable toll on its enemies.The pictures are excellent in this volume, although the photographs are in BlackWhite only because the book was published in 1988 The photographs are, understandably,from the Portuguese forces The plates are the most well balanced in the first three volumes, with both combat uniforms and walking out dress on display, and with the best coverage of the guerrilla units There is box showing Portuguese military badges in BlackWhite, but the authors could have added colored insets on the plates The Ca ador in plate B3 is the perfect exemple of the appearance of the Portuguese soldier in the bush, heavily influenced by the French this plate is evenenriched by the usage of the rare AR 10 in 7,62mm, not 7.92mm The lite Ca adores acted as rapid reaction heliborne forces in accordance to French doctrine of guerre a roport e , as exemplified by the picture in page 33, showing Ca adores disembarking from an Alouette helicopter into action Page 9 shows the typical difference between lite units and regular units, with the Lanceiros Military Police in a very martial posture, while the Ca adores have anon chalant appearence The other lite units are also depicted Fuzileiros D1 , Commandos E1 and Paratroopers E3 Those intervention units were preceded by specialized trackers Pisteiros and pseudo operatives Flechas , who were instrumental in the formation of the Selous Scouts in Rhodesia , who spotted guerrillas and directed the reaction forces Unfortunately, there was little information available about the Flechas at the time of writting.Plate C1 depicts a female nurse, who cared for the wounded even under fire not mentioned in the text was that they were also parachute trained The high mark of the plates was the different types of French inspired camouflaged used by the Portuguese Plate F2 shows an African commando of the GEs in yellow beret and black uniform in their strange parade rest A Dragoon is depected brandishing a Walther P 1 pistol and sideburns, just like the Marine in D1 My only complaint is the absence of the peculiar Portuguese made 37mm bazooka Plates G and H show the guerrillas smartly equipped with Communist bloc weapons and equipment The PAIGC guerrilla even has an East German steel helmet.Well balanced, well written, unbiased, with only minor typos militaires French instead of militares Portuguese , bataria insted of bateria and fogute instead of foguete and with a good coverage of the guerrilla forces in the text and the plates, this book is a solid 5 with flying colours


  2. says:

    Osprey Publishing Men At Arms publication.


  3. says:

    This Osprey volume looks at Portugal s colonial wars in Angola and Mozambique Unlike France and Britain, Portugal managed to hold on to its African colonies through the 1970s Part of this had to do with the single minded nationalism of the Portuguese political leadership, as well as the unusual relationship that the home country had with the African people it ruled Unlike the experience other countries had, Portugal provided for equal legal status of blacks and whites and Europeans and Africa This Osprey volume looks at Portugal s colonial wars in Angola and Mozambique Unlike France and Britain, Portugal managed to hold on to its African colonies through the 1970s Part of this had to do with the single minded nationalism of the Portuguese political leadership, as well as the unusual relationship that the home country had with the African people it ruled Unlike the experience other countries had, Portugal provided for equal legal status of blacks and whites and Europeans and Africans served together in many of the Army units.Portugal, which was not a large or rich country, does enjoy a rich military history and it took advantage of it As a NATO member Portugal had access to modern arms and it configured its small but professional forces to fight the Marxist guerrillas attempting to take over the various colonies and turn them into worker s paradises which of course is not how things worked out The Portuguese even reorganized Cavalry and Artillery units as counterinsurgency units, a practice that the United States would also take advantage of in Iraq against the islamofascists Includes some information on FRELIMO, UNITA, FPLA, etc.The discussion of the campaign in Africa is well done and well illustrated Definitely worth checking out


  4. says:

    disappointing Focused very heavily on the Portuguese colonial forces and not a lot about Frelimo, Mpla, Unita etc I dont recall a single mention of Renamo or Fapla There was practically nothing about Cuban involvement in the angolan conflict or foreign interference at all