Journal of a Novel: The East of Eden Letters MOBI Ñ


  • Hardcover
  • 182 pages
  • Journal of a Novel: The East of Eden Letters
  • John Steinbeck
  • English
  • 18 August 2019
  • 0670409391

10 thoughts on “Journal of a Novel: The East of Eden Letters

  1. Jenny (Reading Envy) Jenny (Reading Envy) says:

    John Steinbeck often used letters to friends to get his writing juices flowing, and during the writing of East of Eden, wrote every day to Pascal Covici, his editor and friend Most entries are written prior and post to the work of the day, ranging from tidbits from his life, commentary on how the novel is going and what he is trying to do, and a revealing obsession with newly sharpened pencils.This is for people interested in the writing process or people who have enjoyed East of Eden I m not John Steinbeck often used letters to friends to get his writing juices flowing, and during the writing of East of Eden, wrote every day to Pascal Covici, his editor and friend Most entries are written prior and post to the work of the day, ranging from tidbits from his life, commentary on how the novel is going and what he is trying to do, and a revealing obsession with newly sharpened pencils.This is for people interested in the writing process or people who have enjoyed East of Eden I m not sure I d pick it up otherwise ETA I saved these two little quotes A great and beautiful storm today such lightning and rain and this always stimulates me like a drug I must have great violence in me because I react to violence in nature with great joy 7 17 51 My sweet Elaine sat many hours with me last night while I put out a thundering silence 8 1 51


  2. Kim Kim says:

    On every working day between 29 January and 1 November 1951, John Steinbeck wrote a letter to his close friend and editor at Viking Press, Pat Covici, before he began his work for the day on the manuscript of East of Eden The letters were written on the left hand pages of the large notebook in which Steinbeck wrote by hand, in pencil the novel which meant most to him Steinbeck told Covici that writing the letters was his way of getting his mental arm in shape to pitch a good game Stei On every working day between 29 January and 1 November 1951, John Steinbeck wrote a letter to his close friend and editor at Viking Press, Pat Covici, before he began his work for the day on the manuscript of East of Eden The letters were written on the left hand pages of the large notebook in which Steinbeck wrote by hand, in pencil the novel which meant most to him Steinbeck told Covici that writing the letters was his way of getting his mental arm in shape to pitch a good game Steinbeck s daily letters to Covici touch on a range of subjects They describe what he intended to achieve on the day in question They refer to his personal circumstances, in particular to his love for his third wife Elaine and his concerns regarding his young sons The letters also describe Steinbeck s other projects the gadgets he liked to invent, his woodwork projects in particular a carved box he was making for Covici and in which he would ultimately give Covici the manuscript of the novel However, the most signficant aspect of the work is the light that the letters throw on the process through which East of Eden was written, on Steinbeck s passionate devotion to the writing of the novel and on his own psychological make up As is fitting for a writer who was skilled at describing people and their environment, Steinbeck had insight into his thought processes and emotions He unflinchingly described his bouts of depression and self doubt, his periods of manic activity, the days when everything went well and the days when he had difficulty motivating himself to work While there is some repetition in the letters there were days which were a lot like other days the work is also full of insights into how Steinbeck felt, not just about the book, but about writing For example, on 3 September 1951 he wrote Writing is a very silly business at best There is a certain ridiculousness about putting down a picture of life And to add to the joke one must withdraw from life in order to set down that picture And third one must distort one s own way of life in order in some sense to simulate the normal in other lives Having gone through all this nonsense, what emerges may well be the palest of reflections And the greatest foolishness of all lies in the fact that to do it at all, the writer must believe that what he is doing is the most important thing in the world And he must hold to this illusion even when he knows it is not true If he does not, the work is not worth even what it might otherwise have been.Steinbeck was not fond of professional literary critics, but he was aware that he could not control how readers would react to East of Eden, the novel which meantto him that anything else he had written On 10 October 1951, three weeks before he finished the manuscript, he wrote In a short time it will be done and it will not be mine anyOther people will take it over and own it and it will drift away from me as though I had never been a part of it I dread that time because one can never pull back It s like shouting good bye to someone going off on a bus and no one can hear because of the roar of the motor I wish I had read this book around the same time as I listened to the audiobook of East of Eden last year, so that the details of the novel were clearer in my head As I read, I occasionally re read particular chapters of the novel in order to refresh my memory However, I know that reading the novel and this book in conjunction with each other would have enriched my experience of both works That said, I very much enjoyed the book It is highly recommended for admirers of Steinbeck s writing in general and East of Eden in particular


  3. M. Sarki M. Sarki says:

    Such a great journal I enjoyed every word Steinbeck was certainly an interesting man This book gives us an inside look at how he worked Myself, not so much a plot driven devotee, but Steinbeck clearly had a plan and he carried it out to perfection I admire him for that and respect his process.


  4. Pierre Rooyen Pierre Rooyen says:

    Well, Mr Steinbeck I go down on my knees before you, Sir It was you who taught me how to tell a story You, who are so darn good, yet so vulnerable and humble.What writer would have the guts to admit, Although sometimes I have felt I held fire in my hands and spread a page with shining, I have never lost the weight of clumsiness, of ignorance, of aching inability And this just after he has put East of Eden together The writer who doesn t use adjectives or adverbs, but seeks the appropriate Well, Mr Steinbeck I go down on my knees before you, Sir It was you who taught me how to tell a story You, who are so darn good, yet so vulnerable and humble.What writer would have the guts to admit, Although sometimes I have felt I held fire in my hands and spread a page with shining, I have never lost the weight of clumsiness, of ignorance, of aching inability And this just after he has put East of Eden together The writer who doesn t use adjectives or adverbs, but seeks the appropriate noun and verb Who writes tightly, but gives the appearance his work is casual Oh Sir, I have learnt much from you And I pass your wisdom on to any writer who will listen One told me she received a publisher s contract because she adopted your wisdom.I have read Journal of a Novel twice now, Grapes of Wrath, twice East of Eden, three times, plus Cannery Row, Tortilla Flat, Of Mice and Men, The Pearl, at least once.Good story telling


  5. Amanda Amanda says:

    There were a couple of nuggets of gold here that made me wonder if Steinbeck thinks as beautifully as he writes The behind the scenes info on EOE was mostly very vague, but sometimes insightful It was fascinating seeing how an author at his prime has plotted out his novel and executes it I d recommend this to hard core Steinbeck or EOE lovers, but the casual reader won t get much from it.


  6. Chris Blocker Chris Blocker says:

    As a fan of East of Eden and the work of John Steinbeck in general, I loved this book There is so much insight into what I consider the most brilliant work of fiction ever crafted With all the cuts that were made to the final product of East of Eden, it s sometimes difficult to tell whether Steinbeck was really dabbling in Postmodernism or not Journal of Novel makes it clear that he was And for that, I love this man.For the writer, there are some wonderful bits of advice in Journal, but it s As a fan of East of Eden and the work of John Steinbeck in general, I loved this book There is so much insight into what I consider the most brilliant work of fiction ever crafted With all the cuts that were made to the final product of East of Eden, it s sometimes difficult to tell whether Steinbeck was really dabbling in Postmodernism or not Journal of Novel makes it clear that he was And for that, I love this man.For the writer, there are some wonderful bits of advice in Journal, but it s probably not worth reading the entire work Essentially, Steinbeck s philosophy could be summed up as do what you feel is right and don t give a damn what anyone says For the layman, there isn t much here After all, Journal of a Novel is a series of letters written to a friend and editor Steinbeck repeatedly says things like I have to go use the toilet now Now, for me, I care Cause I want to know about every bowel movement John Steinbeck had But you, you probably don t care.I d only recommend this book for those who have a passion for East of Eden It ll add some color to an already wonderful story


  7. Shane Shane says:

    Only someone of the stature of John Steinbeck, flying in the fame of his seminal, Pulitzer Prize winning novel, Grapes of Wrath, could have pulled off publishing a diary maintained through the months he wrote his longest and in his eyes best book, East of Eden.The diary was written to his editor Pascal Covici and has an entry for each working day on the novel Steinbeck followed a Mon Fri routine and only broke it to write a short story on one weekend The daily diary entry was a warm up to th Only someone of the stature of John Steinbeck, flying in the fame of his seminal, Pulitzer Prize winning novel, Grapes of Wrath, could have pulled off publishing a diary maintained through the months he wrote his longest and in his eyes best book, East of Eden.The diary was written to his editor Pascal Covici and has an entry for each working day on the novel Steinbeck followed a Mon Fri routine and only broke it to write a short story on one weekend The daily diary entry was a warm up to the day s writing, and we get a sense of his mood on that particular day Here was a writer immersed, excited and engaged with his work, a multi generational fictional history based on his family who lived in the Salinas Valley, California On some days he procrastinated, on other days he was depressed, at other times he was joyous and blowing his own horn that this was the greatest book he had ever written and that everything before had been merely practice I would disagree with that.During the writing of East of Eden, he moves with his family from New York to Nantucket, Massachusetts for a summer vacation, working all the while, as his third wife, Elaine, organizes the family logistics, giving him the time and freedom to work uninterrupted Covici comes by weekly to retrieve the master s pencil written pages to have them typed, and when the Steinbecks are in Nantucket, the handwritten pages are mailed to the publisher s offices Steinbeck is the quintessential craftsman, and when he is not crafting his blockbuster of a novel, he is making furniture around the house and redesigning his kitchen And Steinbeck sharpens his pencils daily and runs through dozens of them before the book is finished.Steinbeck comes across as a needy, manic depressive, constantly in need of validation, given to sudden bouts of binge drinking and worrying about his equally troubled son, Tom His health could also have been compromised due to wounds suffered when he was a correspondent during WWII He is constantly selling the merits of the book as if he is worried that it will be rejected or severely edited Midway through the novel his health starts to suffer, with sleepless nights, eye trouble, nervous fits, depression and an overwhelming desire to play hooky at the first opportunity On the social side, however, he is well connected to the literati and artists of the day who drop in on him regularly Given that this diary is published in its entirety, there is a great deal of repetition and we feel that we are standing in one place, while the novel grows at a fast clip.At the end of the book, Steinbeck includes a long dedication prologue epilogue epitaph that is by far the most lively In it, he features a conversation between the publisher, editor, proof reader, reader and writer, and we see the different viewpoints held by these stakeholders that make a book priceless in its attempt to synthesize such diverse expectations.Although this book may be considered self absorbed and dull by the average reader, to a writer of fiction, this is a great primer on the thinking, motivation, and actions of a journeyman writer who through his all or nothing efforts, and a bit of luck, won the Nobel Prize for Literature, much to his own surprise and that of the prevailing literary establishment


  8. Kathy Stone Kathy Stone says:

    This is the diary John Steinbeck kept while writing East of Eden It is interesting to read what Steinbeck s concerns were while writing this novel of his home town He interweaves family history in with the fictional Trasks to create a counterpoint in the novel, especially concerning the evilness of Cathy This was something he worried about from a critical standpoint as no one is pure evil and he created a purely evil female The parts of his family history also concerned him in the novel, but This is the diary John Steinbeck kept while writing East of Eden It is interesting to read what Steinbeck s concerns were while writing this novel of his home town He interweaves family history in with the fictional Trasks to create a counterpoint in the novel, especially concerning the evilness of Cathy This was something he worried about from a critical standpoint as no one is pure evil and he created a purely evil female The parts of his family history also concerned him in the novel, but he let them stand as this offered contrast and slowed the story down so his readers could savor the story While writing the novel and keeping the diary he kept track of concerns for his sons, what his stepdaughter, Waverly, was doing and the entertainments which he and his third wife, Elaine went to What was playing on Broadway, the Giants Yankees World Series, and a vacation to Nantucket, MA


  9. J.Aleksandr Wootton J.Aleksandr Wootton says:

    Won t leave you breathless, but interesting if you are interested in Steinbeck s personal life, if you are studying East of Eden academically, or if you want to see how writers coax their creativity and manage their personal lives into an unequal yoke whereby, for a brief time most days, they can get work done on lengthy writing projects.


  10. A.E. Reiff A.E. Reiff says:

    I feel that sometimes when I am writing I am very near to a kind of unconsciousness Then time does change its manner and minutes disappear into the cloud of timehaving only one durationall history and all pre history might indeed be one durationless flash like an exploding star, eternal and without durationoh she is lovely, this idea February 14 Steinbeck says he s going remove all the adjectives from the typed version Thoughtless things, along with definite articles, participles I feel that sometimes when I am writing I am very near to a kind of unconsciousness Then time does change its manner and minutes disappear into the cloud of timehaving only one durationall history and all pre history might indeed be one durationless flash like an exploding star, eternal and without durationoh she is lovely, this idea February 14 Steinbeck says he s going remove all the adjectives from the typed version Thoughtless things, along with definite articles, participles And here he has the secret writing which will be burned but that deals with matters I have no wish for anyone to see February 13 creative juices rushing toward an outlet as semen gathers from the four quarters of a man and fights its way into the vesiclethere is no explaining this The joy thing in me has two outlets one a fine charge of love toward the incredibly desirable body and sweetness of woman, and second mostly both the paper and pencil or pen And it is interesting to think what paper and pencil and the wriggling words are They are nothing but the trigger into joy the shout of beauty the cacajada of the pure bliss of creation


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Journal of a Novel: The East of Eden Letters[Read] ➭ Journal of a Novel: The East of Eden Letters By John Steinbeck – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Each working day from January to November , , John Steinbeck warmed up to the work of writing East of Eden and a letter to the late Pascal Covici, his friend and editor of the Viking Press It was his Each working day from Januaryto November John Steinbeck a Novel: PDF Ë warmed up to the work of writing East of Eden and a letter to the late Pascal Covici, his friend and editor of the Viking Press It was his way, he said, of getting my mental arm in shape to pitch a good game Steinbeck s letters were written on the left handed pages Journal of Kindle - of a notebook in which the facing pages would be filled with the text of East of Eden They touched on many subjects story arguements, trial flights of workmanship, concern for his sonsPart autobiography, part writer s workshop, these letters offer an illuminating perspective on Steinbeck s creative process, and a fascinating glimpse of Steinbeck, the private man.


About the Author: John Steinbeck

John Steinbeck III was an American writer He a Novel: PDF Ë wrote the Pulitzer Prize winning novel The Grapes of Wrath, published in and the novella Of Mice and Men, published in In all, he wrote twenty five books, including sixteen novels, six non fiction books and several collections of short stories In Steinbeck received the Nobel Prize for LiteratureSteinbeck grew up Journal of Kindle - in the Salinas Valley region of California, a culturally diverse place of rich migratory and immigrant history This upbringing imparted a regionalistic flavor to his writing, giving many of his works a distinct sense of place Steinbeck moved briefly to New York City, but soon returned home to California to begin his career as a writer Most of his earlier work dealt with of a Novel: MOBI ☆ subjects familiar to him from his formative years An exception was his first novel Cup of Gold which concerns the pirate Henry Morgan, whose adventures had captured Steinbeck s imagination as a childIn his subsequent novels, Steinbeck found aauthentic voice by drawing upon direct memories of his life in California Later he used real historical conditions and events in the first half of th century America, which he had experienced first hand as a reporter Steinbeck often populated his stories with struggling characters his works examined the lives of the working class and migrant workers during the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression His later body of work reflected his wide range of interests, including marine biology, politics, religion, history, and mythology One of his last published works was Travels with Charley, a travelogue of a road trip he took in to rediscover America He died in in New York of a heart attack and his ashes are interred in SalinasSeventeen of his works, including The Grapes of Wrath , Cannery Row , The Pearl , and East of Eden , went on to become Hollywood films, and Steinbeck also achieved success as a Hollywood writer, receiving an Academy Award nomination for Best Story in for Alfred Hitchcock s Lifeboat.