Confessions of a Bad Teacher: The Shocking Truth from the


Confessions of a Bad Teacher: The Shocking Truth from the Front Lines of American Public Education ❰PDF / Epub❯ ☆ Confessions of a Bad Teacher: The Shocking Truth from the Front Lines of American Public Education Author John Owens – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk When John Owens left a lucrative publishing job to teach English at a public school in New York City s South Bronx, he thought he could do some good Instead, he found an educational maelstrom that rob When a Bad Teacher: The Kindle - John Owens left a lucrative publishing a Bad PDF ↠ job to teach English at a public school in New York City s South Bronx, he thought he could do some good Instead, he found an educational Confessions of PDF/EPUB or maelstrom that robs students of real learning to improve the school s statistics at any cost, even demonizing its own support system the teachers Using first hand accounts from teachers across the US Confessions of of a Bad PDF/EPUB ¾ a Bad Teacher is an eye opening look at the dire state of American education and an essential blueprint for how to embrace our best educators and create positive change for our children s futures.

    Download Book Best Sellers in PDF format education and an essential blueprint for how to embrace our best educators and create positive change for our children s futures."/>
  • Paperback
  • 244 pages
  • Confessions of a Bad Teacher: The Shocking Truth from the Front Lines of American Public Education
  • John Owens
  • English
  • 02 October 2019
  • 1402281005

About the Author: John Owens

John a Bad Teacher: The Kindle - Owens is an award winning travel a Bad PDF ↠ journalist, author, editor and photographer based in Vero Beach, Florida His new book, Chickens Are Not Pets, Kid s Eye View of the Shattered American Dream, is Confessions of PDF/EPUB or a brutally honest and soul baring celebration of childhood This collection of stories is a hilarious, insightful flashback packed with joyfully offbeat characters and you can t make this up experiencesChickens Are Not Pets grew of a Bad PDF/EPUB ¾ out of his work as an th and th grade public school English teacher One of the exercises most popular with his students was Writing Your Life students eagerly captured colorful stories about growing up This book resulted from John doing exactly that When John Owens left a lucrative publishing job to teach English at a public school in New York City s South Bronx, he thought he could do some good Instead, he found an educational maelstrom that robs students of real learning to improve the school s statistics at any cost, even demonizing its own support system the teachers Using first hand accounts from teachers across the US Confessions of a Bad Teacher is an eye opening look at the dire state of American education and an essential blueprint for how to embrace our best educators and create positive change for our children s futures.



10 thoughts on “Confessions of a Bad Teacher: The Shocking Truth from the Front Lines of American Public Education

  1. Bookphile Bookphile says:

    As a former teacher, I won t bother denying that I have a bias I believe in a strong public education system, am appalled by public money being used to line the pockets of private industry, and am vehemently against the overemphasis on standardized testing in this country As a parent, I am all of these things andI saw the effects of our deeply troubled system on our students, felt them as a teacher, and am experiencing them as the parent of an elementary age child Even if you don t hav As a former teacher, I won t bother denying that I have a bias I believe in a strong public education system, am appalled by public money being used to line the pockets of private industry, and am vehemently against the overemphasis on standardized testing in this country As a parent, I am all of these things andI saw the effects of our deeply troubled system on our students, felt them as a teacher, and am experiencing them as the parent of an elementary age child Even if you don t have kids, this issue is of the utmost importance because the quality of education in this country will determine the success of business in the future If we don t have an educated workforce, the innovative, high paying jobs will go elsewhere in this global economy, and I think the devastating effects of that would be obvious.Anyone who wonders what it s like to be a teacher should read this book Though I taught in a blue collar suburban district, so much of what Owens experienced echoes my own experiences Being a first year teacher is an overwhelming experience, and the process of teaching is so muchcomplicated than most people imagine Not only do you have to get to know your students and learn how to tailor your lessons to their needs, you have to learn how to navigate the system, attempt to build a rapport with your administrator, and figure out how to deal with parents, none of which is easy The time I spent instructing students was only one small piece of the whole picture of my short teaching career I can probably sum it up best by saying this though I loved working with students, there is nothing that could ever tempt me to return to the classroom, short of a complete, 180 degree turn from the direction in which American education is headed.Owens s book perfectly illustrates why this is Even though I ve been there done that, I still found it eye opening to read about his experiences with endless data compilation I think every American needs to ask themselves a simple question What do we want teachers to spend their time on Do we really want them filling out spreadsheet after spreadsheet, or do we want them to spend that time working with students and crafting instruction that s tailored to each individual class s needs Yes, some data is necessary to assess teacher and school performance but, as Owens shows, we are going about it the wrong way Rather than trying to develop a good system for obtaining information that s as objective as possible, we are wasting billions of dollars on standardized testing and driving bright, motivated people out of the profession by evaluating their performance based on factors out of their control, such as the home situations of their students and the whims of fickle administrators Plus, as Owens shows, this data is far from infallible and, because the stakes are so high, it s subject to manipulation on an alarming scale Simple logic tells us why this is if your boss tells you to do something or you lose your job, you will do that thing using whatever means necessary, even if your methods aren t exactly above board.Administration is another area in need of serious overhaul Owens cites numerous examples of horrible bosses, some of whom proved to be liars and cheats in the end To think that we can plop untrained businesspeople in these positions is a fallacy Administrators need to have a firm background in education, and it would be best if all of them had been classroom teachers for at least 5 10 years, preferably closer to 10 Our high stakes testing environment engenders animosity between administrators and teachers when, really, these two groups should be working in concert as their ostensible goal is the education of all children Instead, the system has set them up as opposing parties to the detriment of all Yes, administrators should have some say in their staffing, but placing the power for all these decisions in their hands only leads to the sorts of abuses and petty squabbles that Owens describes in this book Owens also does a great job of highlighting how deftly administrators have passed the buck of discipline from themselves to teachers, enabling them to engage in rampant CYA as they now have plausible deniability for disciplinary issues in their own schools Why has this happened Discipline was traditionally an integral part of an administrator s job, which freed teachers up to focus on actual teaching, and which benefited students because they didn t have to deal with the distraction of disruptive classmates.The importance of what Owens discusses with regard to special education and mainstreaming can t be underscored either Mainstreaming is a good, democratic idea that makes sense, but only if teachers and students are provided with adequate support It s unconscionable to put a student with learning disabilities into a class and expect them to perform to the same standards as their peers without the benefit of the extra help they need The system is failing special needs students, teachers, and students without special needs alike As Owens emphasizes, regular classroom teachers do not have the background needed to assist special education students A whole different skill set is required, along with the proper training If schools are going to expect regular teachers to be successful in teaching special needs students, those teachers need to be provided with the training required to learn techniques for helping those students.This excellent book provides readers with a real, visceral idea of the challenges facing teachers, schools, and students And things will only get worse if we don t take some serious action and take it soon There is already a dearth of teachers in some subject areas, and the numbers will only continue to decline due to poor pay and deplorable working conditions What incentive does someone with a degree in math or science have to work in a school when they could work for private industry making muchmoney with better working conditions As Owen says, our problems with education are serious and complicated and will require a great deal of time and money to fix It s time America stops throwing money at the problem, wasting taxpayer dollars on pointless reforms and charter schools which are often not held to the same exacting standards as public schools, even though they get public funding that show no quantifiable improvement in outcomes over public schools

  2. Scott Rhee Scott Rhee says:

    Fifty percent of all new teachers will leave the field within the first five to seven years This statistic may actually be higher, asandschool districts across the country are finding themselves going into state receivership due to serious financial cuts because of a growing number of charter and private schools Public education one of the best things that our founding fathers ever devised is in its violent death throes, and politicians don t care Teacher turnover rate is a se Fifty percent of all new teachers will leave the field within the first five to seven years This statistic may actually be higher, asandschool districts across the country are finding themselves going into state receivership due to serious financial cuts because of a growing number of charter and private schools Public education one of the best things that our founding fathers ever devised is in its violent death throes, and politicians don t care Teacher turnover rate is a serious issue It has surpassed the divorce rate in this country.When it comes to our failing educational system, politicians conservative ones, at least, although some liberal voices seem to echo them would put the onus on teachers, as if everything wrong with public education is their fault Never mind that for the past four decades, teachers have been mandated to follow policies and practices at the risk of losing their jobs devised by people in Washington, D.C who have never taught, never worked in the field of education, and who expect schools to follow these mandates without offering any attempt to help pay for them.Never mind that teachers are still accused of being money grubbers and whiners when it s the administrators and superintendents who are getting paid ridiculous amounts of money Strangely enough, it s their salaries that get yearly raises while most teachers haven t seen a raise in their salary for the past ten years, and, in fact, most teachers have seen a decrease in salaries due to rising healthcare coverage costs Never mind that many people within the general public harbor an inexplicable hatred for teachers, most likely borne by FOX News, one sided media attacks such as the film Waiting for Superman which was unquestionably anti union and pro charter schools , and ridiculously unfair Hollywood ized depictions of teachers as either horrible people Half Nelson , Bad Teacher , Fist Fight or miracle workers Stand and Deliver , Dangerous Minds , Freedom Writers.Never mind the number of completely false truths that still exist in the minds of most people teachers get paid all year, even on the three months they re off in the summer they don t their salaries are calculated for a nine month calendar, but teachers have the option of having paychecks spread out over 12 months , they only work part time hours if, by part time, one means over 60 hours a week because a teacher s day never ends at 3 p.m and it doesn t end on weekends , it s impossible to fire a bad teacher it s not it s quite easy in fact, although it depends on what one means by bad , and teachers are overpaid if, by overpaid , one means, as a national average, roughly 55,000 a year But, hey, it s still the fault of the teachers Well, the bad ones anyway So, what exactly is a bad teacher John Owens attempts to answer that in his 2013 book Confessions of a Bad Teacher , which describes his brief tenure as an eighth grade teacher in the New York City school system He was, by his own admission, a bad teacher But what made him bad It may help to illustrate Owens experience with my own Because I was a bad teacher, too.In the 2008 2009 school year, I started teaching at an east side Cleveland public high school A predominantly black suburban demographic, the school was a pretty typical one, dealing with the typical problems of budgetary cuts, a lower income populace, and a growing gang problem.I was excited to get the job, mainly because I was excited to get ajob, any job, teaching Despite the fact that I had many people express worries about me working there, I actually wasn t worried A small part of me may have been nervous, but only because my only experience prior to this job was a private Catholic high school The demographics may have been different, I thought, but kids are still kids.Things started to go sour almost immediately, but it wasn t the kids at all that was the problem I loved the kids They may have been a littlerough around the edges than I was used to, but they were great Discipline wise, they were certainlyof a challenge than the parochial school kids, but one learns to adjust.The problem actually came from an unexpected source the faculty.The teachers I worked with were a great, and diverse, mix of personalities and teaching styles I was excited to learn from them, and they seemed earnestly excited to offer a helping hand If what I describe in the following paragraphs gives the impression that that wasn t actually the case, then I apologize, because my view of them still stands they were good people And good teachers.The problem and I have had several years to ponder my experience at this school, so this is merely my assessment based on those years of reflection is that many of these teachers were veteran teachers, some had been there for many years, some for a few, but all hadexperience than me Their worldview was shaped by the fact that they simply had a better understanding of how the educational system really worked, not how it SHOULD work I think what happened is that the system was so corrupt and problematic, these teachers simply adapted for their own sanity to accommodate to the system Unfortunately, none of them seemed to remember what their original ideal of what being a teacher was any.I remember, during the first week, I was teaching a lesson on the Transcendentalists In class, we read aloud an essay by Emerson and a short excerpt from Thoreau s Civil Disobedience and discussed tthem The reading was short enough to keep the kids engaged and interested, but the discussion that followed was amazing The kids were excited We talked about Naturalism and Fate and, somehow, our discussion brought in everything from Freudianism to Stephen King These were ninth graders, mind you I doubt most of them had even heard of Freud or even King, for that matter.Anyway, during our weekly staff meeting, I was pumped and excited to share my first success story I told the group of teachers in my department about my lesson and about the way the kids were engaged I told them what we had discussed, the wide range of topics that came up in the discussion, and how the kids were really interested.Based on the expressions of the faces as I told the story, however, one would think that I had pissed in their breakfast cereal One lady actually shook her head and said, Oh no, no, no As it turns out, what I had done was wrong I had strayed from the important things, such as the state standards, and I had taught nothing that would help the students for the upcoming standardized tests that was mandatory for all of them and would determine whether they would actually graduate I hadn t taught to the test.I felt sick after that meeting I put on a happy face and pretended to heed their gentle and in their minds extremely helpful warnings, but I was devastated It literally set the tone for the rest of my year there When, in May, I was called into the principal s office and told that my contract was not going to be renewed for the next year, a large part of me was actually relieved Outwardly, I was upset and saddened and terrified I would, after all, have to find another job , but deep down i actually felt as if it might actually be the best thing for me.I was a bad teacher Or rather, I was made to feel like a bad teacher, and that s pretty much the same thing.Owens s book resonated strongly with me because he had a similar experience It has, apparently, resonated with countless other teachers across the country.This country is in crisis Anybody with eyes and ears already knows this, but it goes beyond being a problem that can be fixed by throwing money at something or changing a few policies here and there It is deep rooted and systemic It has been rotting from the inside out for decades, and what we are seeing is now the cascade of devastation and death of the educational system in this country.I want to have hope I have to have hope that things will get better, but I and millions of other bad teachers out there see it getting much worse before it gets better, if it ever does

  3. Kristi Betts Kristi Betts says:

    This book is NOT about a bad teacher It is about a teacher who was caught in a broken system Latinate Institute A broken system with a commanding officer Ms P who wasdriven by the outward appearance of success outdated school information than the actual success of the students When reading about his experiences, and those of other contributing teachers, the dedication to the school and students is evident In general teachers want only the best for their students We don t go int This book is NOT about a bad teacher It is about a teacher who was caught in a broken system Latinate Institute A broken system with a commanding officer Ms P who wasdriven by the outward appearance of success outdated school information than the actual success of the students When reading about his experiences, and those of other contributing teachers, the dedication to the school and students is evident In general teachers want only the best for their students We don t go into the profession for the money There are a great number of other career paths that are a lot less stressful and a great deallucrative, but not as rewarding in the sense of achievement The feeling you have when you see the light come in on that one child s eyes as they get it for the first time is like none other You truly feel like you have won Now, tell me, how can the CEO of any top business relate Okay, maybe they are going to make in one day what a classroom teacher makes in an entire year or sadly maybe two years , but will they have the satisfaction and helping a child learn a skill that will be used for the rest of their life Remember, that CEO got to be in that position because great teachers helped them along the way to be successful Although the title of the book is a little off putting, it is a fabulous read It made me think about my twenty year career in education I am thankful I have never been in the same position as Mr Owens, traveling from classroom to classroom with a cart of materials or working for a difficult commanding officer My experiences are very different in a number of ways, but very similar in others I think all educators will be able to relate to this book and see they too could be labeled as a bad teacher simply because what they see as the best for their students may seem inappropriate by the powers that be This makes me think of a saying I read on a bumper sticker or somewhere else , Those who can, teach Those who can t make the rules for teachers To comply with new guidelines introduced by the Federal Trade Commission, Sourcebooks, Inc has provided a complimentary electronic copy of this book through NetGalley.com

  4. Elizabeth Elizabeth says:

    Imagine being a public school teacher, which is already a tough job long hours during the school year, dealing with behavioral issues, the low salary and lack of resources Now, imagine teaching in a school system that s led by a completely unreasonable principal who s expecting a impossible list of student outcomes Imagine being punished for getting the students engaged in your lesson because they make too much noise when they re excited, but encouraged to pass students who can t even read Imagine being a public school teacher, which is already a tough job long hours during the school year, dealing with behavioral issues, the low salary and lack of resources Now, imagine teaching in a school system that s led by a completely unreasonable principal who s expecting a impossible list of student outcomes Imagine being punished for getting the students engaged in your lesson because they make too much noise when they re excited, but encouraged to pass students who can t even read and speak English, much less analyze Shakespeare This was John Owens experience teaching in the South Bronx for a year, and this book is both the story of his time in the trenches and a body of research that suggests that his experience wasn t unique.Reading this book will, and should, stress you out Horrific working conditions aside, Owens experience reveals a host of complex issues that are crippling our public educational system poverty, evaluating teachers using standardized test scores, disciplinary and behavioral issues, and so forth The solutions will require overhauling entrenched practices and beliefs, not to mention an astonishing influx of resources The sooner we start recognizing and discussing these problems, the better

  5. Caseen Gaines Caseen Gaines says:

    The title of John Owens book, and the back of the book description and blurbs, led me to believe I would be reading about a very good teacher Mr Owens was a new teacher with promise, potential, and much to learn Not bad, but certainly not what I would classify as good With that said, I enjoyed the book As a teacher entering my seventh year, much of what was in Confessions of a Bad Teacher resonated with me Some of it was beyond what I had experienced, thankfully, but I m sure most public The title of John Owens book, and the back of the book description and blurbs, led me to believe I would be reading about a very good teacher Mr Owens was a new teacher with promise, potential, and much to learn Not bad, but certainly not what I would classify as good With that said, I enjoyed the book As a teacher entering my seventh year, much of what was in Confessions of a Bad Teacher resonated with me Some of it was beyond what I had experienced, thankfully, but I m sure most public school teachers can find truth in Owens words The book failed in showing how a truly excellent teacher can also fall victim of being branded as bad, but perhaps that wasn t the point The majority of the book focused on the disconnect between parents, administrators, taxpayers, legislators, and teachers We all share a common goal, but operate within independent circles I do hope Mr Owens continues his work in trying to educate the public as to some of the faults of our educational system

  6. Mel Bee Mel Bee says:

    I implore everyone to take a glance at this book this honest memoir is the best rendering I ve looked at to date about the public education system in America and the true effect of so much reform At the end of the day I still believe teaching is an incredibly rewarding and life defining profession and my administration is caring and helpful think the opposite of Ms P but so many people who are not part of the education system judge it, limit it, and do not truly know what is going on The I implore everyone to take a glance at this book this honest memoir is the best rendering I ve looked at to date about the public education system in America and the true effect of so much reform At the end of the day I still believe teaching is an incredibly rewarding and life defining profession and my administration is caring and helpful think the opposite of Ms P but so many people who are not part of the education system judge it, limit it, and do not truly know what is going on There areandhoops added to a teachers to do lost each year and the system itself has not changed to support individualized or true reform in education As in the case of Mr Owens, these are rough waters to navigate and not everyone makes it through to the other side At the end of the day it s a good thing so many bad teachers remain to continue to broaden students educational horizons despite legislation, administration, and reform What a breath of fresh air in a sea of anti teacher and anti public education articles, documentaries, and books Kudos, Mr Owens

  7. Danielle Danielle says:

    This book is an absolute must read for anyone who cares about the American public education system Both a jolt of reality and a rallying cry, Confessions of a Bad teacher pulls back the curtain and exposes the dangerous truth behind many of the current data driven reform efforts John Owen s honest and compelling memoir needs to be read but,importantly, it needs to be discussed.

  8. Lisa Niver Lisa Niver says:

    Why So Many Of America s Teachers Are Leaving The ProfessionJohn Owens in his book, Confessions of a Bad Teacher, shares that America s public school teachers are being loudly and unfairly blamed for the failure of our nation s public schools As a 2012 nominee for the Presidential Award for Excellence in Math and Science Teaching and a veteran of public and private schools for the last twenty years, I have to agree but I was glad to hear someone else say it in print.The vast majority of teach Why So Many Of America s Teachers Are Leaving The ProfessionJohn Owens in his book, Confessions of a Bad Teacher, shares that America s public school teachers are being loudly and unfairly blamed for the failure of our nation s public schools As a 2012 nominee for the Presidential Award for Excellence in Math and Science Teaching and a veteran of public and private schools for the last twenty years, I have to agree but I was glad to hear someone else say it in print.The vast majority of teachers are working overtime without the tools or budget to manage the plethora of issues inside and outside the classroom On top of that, administrators who only compound the situation by micromanaging the wrong things make the lives of teachers completely untenable with their lack of support.Most teaching preparation programs including the one Mr Owens attended do not adequately prepare anyone for life in the classroom For many beginning teachers, It was as though I had just joined the circus as an apprentice clown and was immediately required to juggle plates, bowling pins, butcher s knives, and axes all day long while walking along a tightrope in midair Teachers makedecisions per hour than any other job including what to do with a student who falls behind, manage students with learning or emotional problems, tailor each lesson every day to up to 125 students orwho are somewhere between illiterate and highly gifted.Sadly some administrators, students and parents instead of partnering with teachers, blame teachers which is easier than doing a massive system overhaul We need teachers who can present a passion for the greatness and potential of learning and the greatness and potential of America I believe John Owens wanted to be one of those people His unsuccessful attempt to complete one year in the classroom paints an ugly and honest picture of life in many American schools today The statistics from the National Commission on Teaching and America s Future show that his experience is not unique as in urban districts, close to 50 percent of newcomers leave the profession during their first five years of teaching Many non teachers claim that teaching is an easy life with long vacations However, as Owens shares his daily routine it is a job way past full time hours, I spent virtually every waking hour 5 a.m to 10 p.m all week long on my teacher duties Lessons, backup lessons, tutoring students during lunch and after school, PowerPoints, grading, inputting data, inputtingdata, meeting with parents, observing experienced teachers to learn their techniques, meeting with my bosses, updating databases, writing reports, and trying to get help from someone for the struggling students in my classes All teachers are familiar with the many hours required to keep lessons, grades and life engaging and organized.Most of the teachers I have worked with have been caring and concerned both with doing a great job and meeting the needs of each student However, every second of the day was filled with demands and sadly students whose needs still weren t being addressed despite all the efforts I could put in Even with the frustrations of not being able to do enough, Owens wishes to be a better teacher and contribute to his students and society but the principal is not interesting in supporting his contributions as a new teacher.Owens creates an enthusiastic response from his students but he is reprimanding for his class being too noisy He has many meetings and moments with the principal as he is warned that he will receive an unsatisfactory rating for his first year skills He learns that inspiring, empowering, really teaching these students is not enough.Many teachers are leaving the profession, as America is demanding too much from its teachers without giving them the proper support to educate students effectively Commitment, caring, pushing for results, and putting in a full work s day no longer seem to be enoughOften, I felt like a soldier dropped behind enemy lines with nothingthan orders No weapon No helmet No hope of reinforcements I was disappointed and frustrated to learn about his challenges, and it reminded me of many situations and schools were I have been forced to work with incompetent management.Students want to share themselves and deserve teachers who can be present and focus on them from Rikkie, the bright, defiant ninth grader, who did a long piece about how prison isn t so bad to a ninth grade girl wrote about the day she saw her father get arrested in the neighborhood check cashing store Students need caring supportive teachers, not teachers who feel threatened that they will lose their job for showing enthusiasm and initiative Teachers need to work in an environment where they can thrive.In Los Angeles, new teachers and old can find mentorship and engaging lessons with the Los Angeles Science Teachers Network In response to an overwhelming situation in 2009, I created this network for professional development, support and camaraderie Administrators cannot do everything and we all must participate to improve learning for the children Do not listen to the blame Do something about it We are each responsible to do what we can Write a blog, start a network, help a child and find a way to feel supported in the classroom America needs you.About this review Lisa Niver Rajna was a 2012 nominee for the Presidential Award for Excellence in Math and Science Teaching She was the first teacher to appear on Career Day She and her husband George are on a career break sharing their world adventures on We Said Go Travel.This review first appeared on the Huffington Post as of Nov 11 it has had over 1.4K likes and over 50 comments Add your views

  9. Mimi Fintel Mimi Fintel says:

    I feel this book should be required reading for every adult in the U.S John Owens left a high paying job to teach English at a public school in New York City s South Bronx He felt he could give back to the community in a positive way by becoming a teacher However, what he encountered instead was a broken educational system which was focused on test scores and an administration that offered no support to the teachers In many schools across the U.S the same thing is happening Teachers that c I feel this book should be required reading for every adult in the U.S John Owens left a high paying job to teach English at a public school in New York City s South Bronx He felt he could give back to the community in a positive way by becoming a teacher However, what he encountered instead was a broken educational system which was focused on test scores and an administration that offered no support to the teachers In many schools across the U.S the same thing is happening Teachers that cannot live up to all the reform mandates and or have to deal with an administration that talks the talk but doesn t walk the walk are then labeled bad teachers Here is an excerpt from the book that perfectly defines what is happening in many schools Today, teachers must be able to pull every student into every topic with the power of a video game and get them to not only absorb but also to process, analyze, and synthesize the information at the highest level And do it every day, every time, regardless of the students learning abilities or the resources available to them The general expectation is that poverty, learning disabilities, medical emotional issues, and behavior problems shouldn t stand in the way of student achievement Until the citizens of the United States start demanding that teachers be able to teach really teach not just teach to a test the educational system will stay broken with school systems fudging their data and kids getting second rate educations at best This is a must read

  10. Jenny GB Jenny GB says:

    Sadly, this book was nothing new for me I ve lived some of it and read lotsabout the rest I m really saddened by the direct of education in the US and I m not sure how much longer I would like to be a part of it which breaks my heart because I love my students Mr Owens talks about his experiences teaching in a inner city school In particular, he details the insanity of personal grudges from administrators, endless data and testing, and how tough it is to learn classroom management wit Sadly, this book was nothing new for me I ve lived some of it and read lotsabout the rest I m really saddened by the direct of education in the US and I m not sure how much longer I would like to be a part of it which breaks my heart because I love my students Mr Owens talks about his experiences teaching in a inner city school In particular, he details the insanity of personal grudges from administrators, endless data and testing, and how tough it is to learn classroom management with a room full of neglected and academically deficient students I am not in an inner city school, but I myself have been told that students that only complete half an assignment should be given 60% credit instead of 50% credit because at least that looks better to them when they look at the grades this is assuming they look at their grades Even that really bothered me so I can t imagine the number gymnastics and outright cheating that occurs in other schools around the country This should be a must read for anyone involved in public education They need to read these books over and over until they learn that problems are not isolated to one area or one teacher, but a nation of teachers

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *