Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Field Guide

Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Field Guide for Leaders, Managers, and Facilitators ❴Download❵ ✤ Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Field Guide for Leaders, Managers, and Facilitators Author Patrick Lencioni – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk In the years following the publication of Patrick Lencioni s best seller The Five Dysfunctions of a Team,fans have been clamoring for information on how to implement the ideas outlined in the book In In the years following the publication Five Dysfunctions PDF ´ of Patrick Lencioni s best seller The Five Dysfunctions of a Team,fans have been clamoring for information on how to implement the ideas outlined in the book In Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team, Lencioni offers specific, practical guidance for overcoming the Five Dysfunctions using tools, exercises, assessments, and real world examples He examines questions that all teams must ask themselves Are we really a team How are we currently performing Are we prepared Overcoming the MOBI :Ê to invest the time and energy required to be a great team Written concisely and to the point, this guide gives leaders, line managers, and consultants alike the tools they need to get their teams up and running quickly and effectively.


10 thoughts on “Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Field Guide for Leaders, Managers, and Facilitators

  1. Jenn "JR" Jenn "JR" says:

    This is one of the best books I have read all year about leading teams muchuseful than the last multi week project management course I took I ve worked in environments where strong team building was a priority and have always appreciated the extra effort made to organize team off sites where everyone works together on many of the issues described in this book Even though I am not leading team and my department is huge and geographically dispersed, I feel like there s a lot of material This is one of the best books I have read all year about leading teams muchuseful than the last multi week project management course I took I ve worked in environments where strong team building was a priority and have always appreciated the extra effort made to organize team off sites where everyone works together on many of the issues described in this book Even though I am not leading team and my department is huge and geographically dispersed, I feel like there s a lot of material here that I can take away to help with my projects.Similar to some of the recent books I have read Power of Habit , Reprogram Your Weight and even Outliers there is discussion of the Fundamental Attribute Error human beings tend to falsely attribute the negative behaviors of others to their character an internal attribution , while they attribute their own negative behaviors to their environment an external attribution.That s a tremendous bit of human behavior that we should all keep in mind It s something I constantly repeat when one of my friends gets mad at some behavior in traffic, for example, That person probably wasn t thinking of you at all they were just thinking of themselves It s NOT personal My biggest takeaways from this book are around meetings and metrics for success Even if I do not currently find myself in a position to organize and lead a team offsite based on the information in this book wish we could do that , there are some really great concepts I can apply.First meetings Boring meetings where everyone agrees or some people don t talk or where nobody comes to consensus indicate a lack of clarity of purpose, perhaps even the wrong people in the meeting and worse, theultimate penalty of boring meetings is bad decisions, not to mention wasted time It is important to get buy in at the beginning of the meeting or discussion raise the anxiety a bit This isn t just a status meeting let s have a meeting to commit to an decision that is important because it affects some goal that we all care about Status can happen in e mail or on the wiki.Second, the author stresses the difference between consensus and commitment one of the key qualities of leadership in moving forward to a goal is getting people to commit, buying in to decisions when the right answer seems nowhere to be found Further, Good leaders drive commitment among the team by first extracting every possible idea, opinion, and perspective from the team and then step up and make a decision NB commitment cannot happen if there is not perfect clarity and that s where cascading communication comes into play Recap what did we decide here today in the meeting, and then send it out in e mail, and make sure the team members communicate it to their staff right away.One of the tips in this book is to start a meeting with a lightning round, allowing nothan thirty seconds to update the team about their three top priorities that week. Another excellent tip is to track progress against specific goals and objectives so that the team can stay on track and ensure that decisions around changes in scope or priority are measured against those objectives Finally the author makes it clear that building a good team requires commitment to process and is like a marriage, it happens over time Being able to build trust on a team, using inquiry to hear all the ideas, making decisions based on specific goals these all can help a team make better decisions and beeffective efficient The last section of the book provides an outline of the itinerary and directions for different exercises pretty high level but still appears to be a very useful tool for managing a team building offsite I ll definitely keep this in my back pocket for future reference and recommend it to anyone who works on a team of any type Author website with tools resources


  2. Todd Todd says:

    A practical follow up to Patrick Lencioni s Five Dysfunctions of a Team If that book defines the problem, these are the solutions Trainers, coaches and leaders will find this a treasure trove of exercises to build and mature teams.


  3. Craig Childs Craig Childs says:

    This slim field guide is the follow up to the author s best selling business book The Five Dysfunctions of a Team The dysfunctions are 1 Absence of Trust2 Fear of Conflict3 Lack of Commitment4 Avoidance of Accountability 5 Inattention to ResultsLencioni offers practical tools assessments, role playing, sharing exercises, etc to help leaders overcome each dysfunction This volume is oriented primarily around the sorts of workshops a lead team can perform in a one or two day offsite retr This slim field guide is the follow up to the author s best selling business book The Five Dysfunctions of a Team The dysfunctions are 1 Absence of Trust2 Fear of Conflict3 Lack of Commitment4 Avoidance of Accountability 5 Inattention to ResultsLencioni offers practical tools assessments, role playing, sharing exercises, etc to help leaders overcome each dysfunction This volume is oriented primarily around the sorts of workshops a lead team can perform in a one or two day offsite retreat.I did not have any Aha moments but did find some tools I can use in my company.One principle in the book I had never really considered is the assertion a leader must becommitted to the team he is a member of usually, a lead team rather than the team he leads usually a department or functional team Intellectually, I understand this is necessary to put the goals of the company above the goals of an individual department, but on a gut level, I also believe leaders have a high responsibility to individuals under them who directly rely on them for training, developmental assignments, and career advancement opportunities I am always hesitant when asked to support the needs of any group if it comes at the expense of the well being of my own direct reports That said, Lencioni makes a compelling case If leaders cannot cooperate to achieve the greater good, it is usually the individual contributors who will suffer having to wade through internal politics and turf wars


  4. المدرب محمد الملا المدرب محمد الملا says:

    A really successor for the The Five Dysfunctions of a Team bookInformative, Clear, simple, Direct and work reading This book can be read by spectlist in team building Team leaders and mangers,then any other readers But, reader should be aware that there isabout team building then this bookto be aware of about teams is out there Regards


  5. Tõnu Vahtra Tõnu Vahtra says:

    Clarity The elimination of assumptions and ambiguity from a situation.Mining for conflict A facilitation skill that requires an individual to extract buried disagreements within a team and bring them to the surface.Teamwork The state achieved by a group of people working together who trust one another, engage in healthy conflict, commit to decisions, hold one another accountable, and focus on collective results.ABSENCE OF TRUSTMembers of great teams trust one another on a fundamental, emot Clarity The elimination of assumptions and ambiguity from a situation.Mining for conflict A facilitation skill that requires an individual to extract buried disagreements within a team and bring them to the surface.Teamwork The state achieved by a group of people working together who trust one another, engage in healthy conflict, commit to decisions, hold one another accountable, and focus on collective results.ABSENCE OF TRUSTMembers of great teams trust one another on a fundamental, emotional level, and they are comfortable being vulnerable with each other about their weaknesses, mistakes, fears and behaviors They get to a point where they can be completely open with one another, without filters This is essential becauseFEAR OF CONFLICTTeams that trust one another are not afraid to engage in passionate dialogue around issues and decisions that are key to the organization s success They do not hesitate to disagree with, challenge and question one another, all in the spirit of finding the best answers, discovering the truth and making great decisions This is important becauseLACK OF COMMITMENTTeams that engage in unfiltered conflict are able to achieve genuine buy in around important decisions, even when various members of the team initially disagree That s because they ensure that all opinions and ideas are put on the table and considered, giving confidence to team members that no stone has been left unturned This is critical becauseAVOIDANCE OF ACCOUNTABILITYTeams that commit to decisions and standards of performance do not hesitate to hold each other accountable for adhering to those decisions and standards What is , they don t rely on the team leader as the primary source of accountability, they go directly to their peers This matters becauseINATTENTION TO RESULTSTeams that trust one another, engage in conflict, commit to decisions and hold one another accountable are very likely to set aside their individual needs and agendas and focus almost exclusively on what is best for the team They do not give in to the temptation to place their departments, career aspirations or ego driven status ahead of the collective results that define team success.Building trust Trust is the foundation of teamwork On a team, trust is all about vulnerability, which is difficult for most people Building trust takes time, but the process can be greatly accelerated Like good marriage, trust on a team is never complete it must be maintained over time.Mastering conflict Good conflict among team members requires trust, which is all about engaging in unfiltered, passionate debate around issues Even among the best teams, conflict will at times be uncomfortable Conflict norms, though they will vary from team to team, must be discussed and and made clear among the team The fear of occasional personal conflict should not deter a team from having regular, productive debate.Achieving commitment Commitment requires clarity and buy in Clarity requires that teams avoid assumptions and ambiguity, and that they end discussions with a clear understanding about what they ve decided upon Buy in does not require consensus Members of great teams learn to disagree with one another and still commit to a decision.Embracing accountability Accountability on a strong team occurs directly among peers For a culture of accountability to thrive, a leader must demonstrate a willingness to confront difficult issues The best opportunity for holding one another accountable occurs during meetings, and the regular review of a team scoreboard providers a clear context for doing so.Focusing on results The true measure of a great team is that it accomplishes the results it sets out to achieve To avoid distractions, team members must prioritize the results of the team over their individual or departmental needs To stay focused, teams must publicly clarify their desired results and keep them visible.Quotes Ironically, for peer to peer accountability to become a part of a team s culture, it has to be modeled by the leader That s right Even though I said earlier that the best kind of accountability is peer to peer, the key to making it stick is the willingness of the team leader to do something I call enter the danger whenever someone needs to be called on their behavior or performance That means being willing to step right into the middle of a difficult issue and remind individual team members of their responsibility, both in terms of behavior and results But most leaders I know have a far easier time holding people accountable for their results than they do for behavioral issues This is a problem because behavioral problems almost always precede results That means team members have to be willing to call each other on behavioral issues, as uncomfortable as that might be, and if they see their leader balk at doing this, then they aren t going to do it themselves People who don t like conflict have an amazing ability to avoid it, even when they know it s theoretically necessary The lack of conflict is precisely the cause of one of the biggest problems that meetings have they are boring But perhaps most important of all, having too many people on a team makes team dynamics during meetings and other decision making events almost impossible That s because a good team has to engage in two types of communication in order to optimize decision making, but only one of these is practical in a large group According to Harvard s Chris Argyris, those two types of communication are advocacy and inquiry Basically, advocacy is the statement of ideas and opinions inquiry is the asking of questions for clarity and understanding When a group gets too large, people realize they are not going to get the floor back any time soon, so they resort almost exclusively to advocacy It becomes like Congress which is not designed to be a team or the United Nations ditto


  6. Patrick Patrick says:

    One of the problems with reading must read books in a field after you ve been working for 15 years is that you spend a lot of time saying, Well, duh, I knew that already Of course, if you can remember what it was like 15 years ago when you started working, you d say to yourself Hmmm this book would have saved me a lot of headaches if I read it 15 years ago If you ve never really thought much about team dynamics or only thought about team dynamics in the YOU TEAM sense , this One of the problems with reading must read books in a field after you ve been working for 15 years is that you spend a lot of time saying, Well, duh, I knew that already Of course, if you can remember what it was like 15 years ago when you started working, you d say to yourself Hmmm this book would have saved me a lot of headaches if I read it 15 years ago If you ve never really thought much about team dynamics or only thought about team dynamics in the YOU TEAM sense , this is actually a great book If you have a dysfunctional team or you re on a dysfunctional team , and you re too close to the problem to figure out how to deal with it, it s a good read It can remind you of what you already know or, if you re not in a position to fix anything, can help you come to grips with the reality of what s going on


  7. Mark Mark says:

    Very good, and a fairly quick read Some Great team insights with good exercises outlined The core concepts are solid It s a great book for team members to read because it s not quite as involved as some books are, yet the core attributes of great team participation or membership is laid out very well I m recommending this to my entire team This fits seamlessly with Agile and Scrum concepts too yet is not as big of a bite for people who aren t ready for the entire Scrum layout Extremely u Very good, and a fairly quick read Some Great team insights with good exercises outlined The core concepts are solid It s a great book for team members to read because it s not quite as involved as some books are, yet the core attributes of great team participation or membership is laid out very well I m recommending this to my entire team This fits seamlessly with Agile and Scrum concepts too yet is not as big of a bite for people who aren t ready for the entire Scrum layout Extremely useful book in many situations


  8. Melody Melody says:

    Actually, this is a very book which I do not think got the publicity or attention it should have It demonstrates how to use applied psychology in the work place to build teams A good manager know this information, but Patrick does a good job of labeling it and organizing it so that it can be communicated and taught to others He also does a great job of covering the elements of team building and dysfunction such that even a seasoned manager can learn something from this book.


  9. Jeff Yoak Jeff Yoak says:

    This book ended up beingor less a repeat of the material in the Five Dysfunctions book, though told in a different style I suspect either book would be good on its own without the other, though ultimately, I d prefer the original.


  10. Kashif Kashif says:

    Why this book was written Great team management is one of the most integral parts of leadership and the biggest factor to success This book shows how to achieve this simple yet often elusive task Summary The keys to a great team are a set of 5 interlocking parts, which are the most frequent causes of dysfunctions in a team hence the name of the book This author shows how each of these parts leads to the next and ultimately builds great teams Trust The first and most crucial ingredie Why this book was written Great team management is one of the most integral parts of leadership and the biggest factor to success This book shows how to achieve this simple yet often elusive task Summary The keys to a great team are a set of 5 interlocking parts, which are the most frequent causes of dysfunctions in a team hence the name of the book This author shows how each of these parts leads to the next and ultimately builds great teams Trust The first and most crucial ingredient in a team is trust An environment of trust is a prerequisite to a great team because it gives team members the psychological safety by releasing the chemical Oxytocin in the body to perform at their best, without wasting brain power on political maneuvering Constructive Argument When team members trust that their peers will look out for them and have their backs, they are open to freely share their views on problems and build a system where problems are solved quickly and efficiently Team Commitment When everyone in the team knows that all the voices have been heard and weighed on merit, they will be on board with the decision and have full buy in, regardless of whether their decision won out Accountability When there s buy in from the whole team on a course of action, members feel accountable for their end of the results This means, team members course correct in a decentralized manner that is much faster andeffective than a top down, centralized, command and control system High Performance This is the result when all the four previous pieces fall into place When there s trust in the team, members are confident enough to openly air constructive feedback, are committed to the end goal and are accountable for their parts of the mission, everything comes together around the goal set by the organization and success results Key Highlights Trust between team members is the key to starting the domino of successful team performance Myers and Briggs tests are a helpful measure of individual characteristics and can be used to calibrate team dynamics Contrary to popular belief, off sites are useful You just have to know how to run them These can act as Intensive Camps to foster team bonding, understanding and cohesion to enable high performance back at base


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