The Antidote: Happiness for People Who Can't Stand


10 thoughts on “The Antidote: Happiness for People Who Can't Stand Positive Thinking

  1. Seamus Thompson Seamus Thompson says:

    This might be the only so called self help book that includes a quote from The Wire at the beginning of a chapter and surely that s a good sign.I m not someone who reads a lot of self help books I don t read them at all, really, though living in Southern California for a couple decades meant inevitable contact with self help gurus and enthusiasts Positive thinking, visualization and imitating the habits of successful people have always struck me as somehow deficient tactics but I never re This might be the only so called self help book that includes a quote from The Wire at the beginning of a chapter and surely that s a good sign.I m not someone who reads a lot of self help books I don t read them at all, really, though living in Southern California for a couple decades meant inevitable contact with self help gurus and enthusiasts Positive thinking, visualization and imitating the habits of successful people have always struck me as somehow deficient tactics but I never really bothered to think through my objections with any degree of thoroughness let alone formulate an alternative In fact, if anything, I have been prone to blaming myself for not feeling able to buy into such ideas.I would have been content if this book had been what I expected an acerbic expose of self help hokum Instead, it proved to be mucha cogent synthesis of a number of philosophical and psychological notions and approaches that offer a healthier,realistic, way of living a happier life Drawing from Stoicism the real thing, not the straw man version most of us hear about , Buddhism, and psychological studies that are critical of so called positive thinking, what I found most striking about The Antidote was how often it seemed to articulate and complete my own half formed ideas Forcing yourself to think positive often makes failure that muchdevastating setting long terms goals often means scuttling your well being in the drive to achieve and doubling down at the very moment it might make sense to abandon a bad idea trying to feel motivated can create an extra thing to be frustrated and depressed about there is comfort and relief to be found in contemplating worst case scenarios and even death itself rather than trying to emphasize the positive at all costsand on and on.To be clear the approaches note the plural outlined in this book are not meant to help you achieve happiness in some defined, end of the line, concrete sense Instead it is a toolkit, a series of ways to approach liferealistically and genuinely Somehow the positive thought advocates have created the sense that their approach is about embracing life when, in fact, the opposite is true their approach involves ignoring and denying much of what makes life what it is What this book tries to do is offer some ways of finding happiness rather than Being Happy by taking in the totality of our lives rather than filtering out whatever we perceive as an obstacle to our goals


  2. Sanjay Gautam Sanjay Gautam says:

    Murphy s Law symbolize the error prone nature of people and processes This book shows how possibly the culture of positive thinking and cult of optimism can go wrong and how Murphy s law is applicable to it Anything that can go wrong, will.The book remains true to its title It is really meant for the people who can t stand positive thinking , cult of optimism kind of approaches to happiness What this book does is that it shows a new and counter intuitive approach to happiness NEGATIVE PA Murphy s Law symbolize the error prone nature of people and processes This book shows how possibly the culture of positive thinking and cult of optimism can go wrong and how Murphy s law is applicable to it Anything that can go wrong, will.The book remains true to its title It is really meant for the people who can t stand positive thinking , cult of optimism kind of approaches to happiness What this book does is that it shows a new and counter intuitive approach to happiness NEGATIVE PATH to HAPPINESS The negative path to happiness involves embracing failures, insecurity and uncertainty in one s life.The best thing I liked about the book is that the way in which author has shown the limits, disadvantages and futility of these popular cult of positive thinking and optimism kind of approaches without being sarcastic p.To quote an example from book It is not certitude, comfort or any desired mental state such as, calm as we normally think of them, but rather the strange, excited comfort of being presented with, and grappling with, the tremendous mysteries life offers Ultimately, what defines the cult of optimism and positive thinking even in most mystically new age reforms is that it abhors a mystery It seeks to make things certain, to make happiness permanent and final And it is precisely this that hurts and makes people prone to suffering.One line from Murphy s law sums this up Once a job is fouled up, anything done to improve it only makes it worse Read the book to find it how.Its highly recommended for those who really can t stand positive thinking and want somethingworthwhile and satisfying


  3. Caroline Caroline says:

    Curmudgeonly Brit that I am, I enjoyed this book a lot I read it at a gallop I found it wonderfully provocative I could have filled its margins with comments, heavily pressed into the paper, and accompanied by lots of exclamation marks The general drift of the book is that the roaring ra ra ra of positive thinking does not work Day by day, in every way, we are NOT getting better and better The author, Oliver Burkeman, a Guardian journalist covering psychology, says that instead we need to Curmudgeonly Brit that I am, I enjoyed this book a lot I read it at a gallop I found it wonderfully provocative I could have filled its margins with comments, heavily pressed into the paper, and accompanied by lots of exclamation marks The general drift of the book is that the roaring ra ra ra of positive thinking does not work Day by day, in every way, we are NOT getting better and better The author, Oliver Burkeman, a Guardian journalist covering psychology, says that instead we need to cultivate an attitude of reasonable pessimism We need to distance ourselves from the ructions of our emotions and embrace the essence of the human condition uncertainty and death Surprisingly, he feels, therein lies the path to happiness or at least the path to detachment, acceptance and contentment.He discusses the Stoics, Buddhist philosophies and practices, and societies which embrace uncertainty rather than avoiding it He talks of the merits of meditation, and of our current misplaced obsession with setting ourselves goals.He also interestingly talks a lot about how most self help books try and change our mindset If we procrastinateself help books will give us exercises to try and get us in the mood for doing what we have to do That is the essence of how they work Burkeman on the other hand supports the Buddhist approach of accepting one s moods as they are, and doing what one has to do in spite of how one is feeling He cites Anthony Trollope, who unfailingly used to write for 3 hours each morning, before going off to his day job He wrote 47 novels during his lifetime He also quotes the artist Chuck Close Inspiration is for amateurs The rest of us just show up and get to work But but, but, but I think this approach to life is only feasible if you are naturally a disciplined person My father was He was a Trollope through and through I on the other hand am a jelly person I need gentle encouragement and lots of treats in order to do anything Strangely though this doesn t stop me aligning myself with the rather Spartan ideas put forward in the book.I also find meditation awfully difficult I have tried it on and off for about 40 years, and always get fed up with it after just a short time.Finally, far from being the detached and philosophical being glowingly described by the author, I m an old drama queen, who bangs the table about injustices, and get very upset when things go wrong.For me that is the missing chapter in this book Whilst I greatly admire a lot of what the author said, his ideas and suggestions are very much geared up to a certain sort of personality and I am not that personality The book was very interesting indeed,but it isn t going to alter the lifestyle or perspectives of an emotional jellied wimp like myself


  4. B Schrodinger B Schrodinger says:

    People often remark on how happy I always appear most of the time I have a smile on my face And I must admit that my moods are fairly stable But I m definitely not one for always looking on the bright side of life, and I wouldn t call myself an optimist at all I m also very sceptical, especially about psychological strategies to get the most out of life I have encountered postive psychology in my education studies and while I must admit that some aspects my be helpful, I cringe at the People often remark on how happy I always appear most of the time I have a smile on my face And I must admit that my moods are fairly stable But I m definitely not one for always looking on the bright side of life, and I wouldn t call myself an optimist at all I m also very sceptical, especially about psychological strategies to get the most out of life I have encountered postive psychology in my education studies and while I must admit that some aspects my be helpful, I cringe at the whole put a smile on your face and deal with it kind of attitude Positive psychological strategies come across as selfish, ignorant and just plain putting your head in the sand sometimes.So I came across this book on Audible and gave the demo a listen The narrator, also the author, was not annoying and the short piece seemed to be intelligent Therefore, on a whim, I purchased it This book is a pleasant surprise and helped me expand on my own personal psychological beliefs and consolidate others It seems that I m a Stoic and there was fascinating chapter on Stoicism There are various chapters on other psychological theories and practices that are far removed from the positive, yet provide a basis for a fruitful and wonderful life all the same Oliver also deconstructs positive psychology and argues that it just doesn t work After all, it s been out there for several decades, it produces hundreds of self help books a year and pays the coffers for gurus the world over But we are not happier This book also struck a chord after reading Chris Hadfield s An Astronaut s Guide to Life on Earth which had some great and inspirational sections on his philosophy A lot of what Oliver talk about is linked to Chris Hadfield s view on life and also my own.So I d recommend this for the people out there who feel like slapping self help gurus, see the self improvement section of the library and bookstore as a waster of good space and people who just want to live their life with all emotions and not be forced to feel like they should be living in a Coca Cola commercial It s a great little book to help you with new ideas and say that you are not a freak and nothing is wrong with you I think I m going to read upon Stoicism


  5. Diane Diane says:

    What a clever and amusing and interesting and thoughtful book I needadjectives to describe how much I enjoyed this look at happiness in the modern world.Oliver Burkeman is a journalist who was skeptical of the cult of optimism, and he digs into the research on positive thinking and talks to various experts in the field The first thing he learns is that you can t suppress negative thoughts suppression doesn t work Whatever idea you are trying to squash down will only continue to pop What a clever and amusing and interesting and thoughtful book I needadjectives to describe how much I enjoyed this look at happiness in the modern world.Oliver Burkeman is a journalist who was skeptical of the cult of optimism, and he digs into the research on positive thinking and talks to various experts in the field The first thing he learns is that you can t suppress negative thoughts suppression doesn t work Whatever idea you are trying to squash down will only continue to pop up.One of my favorite chapters was about goal setting, and how becoming obsessed with achieving goals can sometimes have damaging consequences, such as a financial crisis, or in the case of some Mount Everest climbers, even death Another interesting chapter was on stoicism, and on recognizing that things could always be worse There were also good sections on overcoming fear of failure and embarrassment.There were so many fascinating parts of this book that I think I ll have to reread it I listened to this on audio, and I enjoyed Burkeman s narration I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in popular psychology research.Favorite Quote The point here is not that negative capability is always superior to the positive kind Optimism is wonderful goals can sometimes be useful even positive thinking and positive visualization have their benefits The problem is that we have developed the habit of chronically overvaluing positivity and the skills of doing in how we think about happiness, and that we chronically undervalue negativity and the not doing skills, such as resting in uncertainty or getting friendly towards failure To use an old cliche of therapy speak, we spend too much of our lives seeking closure Even those of us who mock such cliches are often motivated by a craving to put an end to uncertainty and anxiety, whether by convincing ourselves that the future is bright, or by resigning ourselves despondently to the expectation that it won t be What we needof, instead, is what the psychologist Paul Pearsall called openture Yes, this is an awkward neologism But its very awkwardness is a reminder of the spirit that it expresses, which includes embracing imperfection and easing up on the search for neat solutions


  6. Marie Murrell Marie Murrell says:

    This might be my favorite self help book of all time In a nutshell, rather than trying to force ourselves to be cheerful when we don t feel cheerful by thinking positively, it suggests we think of the worst thing that can happen and realize that whatever that worst thing is, it isn t likely to be the end of the world On procrastination, it suggests we stop trying to feel motivated and just do what we have to do moods and actions don t have to be related On goals, it explores whether goal str This might be my favorite self help book of all time In a nutshell, rather than trying to force ourselves to be cheerful when we don t feel cheerful by thinking positively, it suggests we think of the worst thing that can happen and realize that whatever that worst thing is, it isn t likely to be the end of the world On procrastination, it suggests we stop trying to feel motivated and just do what we have to do moods and actions don t have to be related On goals, it explores whether goal striving brings happiness or might actually be counter productive As someone who has spent the last 30 years reading self help books with optimism of making meaningful changes that will transform me into the person I wish to be, this is a welcome change of pace Over the past few weeks, I ve been just accepting whatever mood I m in and getting on with what I have to do in my day, and I feel happier already An added bonus is that when I ask myself what the what is the worst thing that will happen if I don t do something like flossing my teeth, I find that while it isn t the end of the world, I really prefer not to have them all rot and fall out, so I am, ironically, finding the motivation after all There is much, much , but I find it interesting that the one book that basically tells us to quit trying is impacting me


  7. Bonny Bonny says:

    I used to do the lab work for a local group of oncologists, and one evening I heard someone crying in the waiting room The rest of the staff had left and the doctors were doing rounds, so I went to see what was going on I found a patient sitting there, crying quietly She had been in remission twice, but had recently relapsed She said she needed to talk to one of the doctors because she didn t know what she was doing wrong When we talked further, she said she had been using some visualizati I used to do the lab work for a local group of oncologists, and one evening I heard someone crying in the waiting room The rest of the staff had left and the doctors were doing rounds, so I went to see what was going on I found a patient sitting there, crying quietly She had been in remission twice, but had recently relapsed She said she needed to talk to one of the doctors because she didn t know what she was doing wrong When we talked further, she said she had been using some visualization tapes, where you are directed to imagine that lasers or your vigilante white cells are killing your tumor She had also been using some positive thinking for cancer patients tapes where you are told to repeat, I am healthy and I am cancer free She was incredibly upset, not so much by the cancer, but because she felt that her inability to cure herself with positive thinking meant that she was doing something wrong and it was her fault For me, that moment confirmed that positive thinking, used in the wrong circumstances and for the wrong reasons, can doharm than good The Antidote explores that interesting idea.Oliver Burkeman is not out to bash positive thinking, but rather to explore the negative path , the idea that thewe search for happiness and security, the less we achieve them This is done through chapters on Stoicism, the ways goals can be counterproductive or destructive, insecurity, the non attachment of Zen Buddhism, failure, and our fear of death He presents ideas about what might make our lives less unhappy, but this isn t in the typical self help form of strict rules or a program to be blindly followed.The conclusions Burkeman seems to come to are to embrace insecurity, and stop searching for happiness and quick fixes Rather than thinking about everything in a positive way, it is much better to see things realistically, accurately, and truthfully That is a philosophy I wholeheartedly agree with


  8. Ms. Smartarse Ms. Smartarse says:

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  9. Laura Leaney Laura Leaney says:

    This is a friendly little book that purports to be an anti self help book although I havethan a sneaking suspicion that it IS a self help book My guess is that Oliver Burkeman is preaching to the choir, to use an old clich , because I doubt any individual feeling the rosy after glow of a Get Motivated seminar will pick it up for an afternoon s reading I bought the thing after reading a review in the Los Angeles Times, thinking it would offer a humorous take on our cultural obsession This is a friendly little book that purports to be an anti self help book although I havethan a sneaking suspicion that it IS a self help book My guess is that Oliver Burkeman is preaching to the choir, to use an old clich , because I doubt any individual feeling the rosy after glow of a Get Motivated seminar will pick it up for an afternoon s reading I bought the thing after reading a review in the Los Angeles Times, thinking it would offer a humorous take on our cultural obsession with happiness and Looking On the Bright Side.He does But the author also discusses some very interesting philosophies by current and ancient thinkers I appreciated his take on Stoicism I m a personal fan of Epictetus , Buddhism, Freud, et cetera And I agree with him when he writes that maybe our definition of happiness is screwed up He also comments on the hidden benefits of insecurity and quotes Tennessee Williams Security is a kind of death, I think This struck a chord with me Oliver Burkeman is no expert philosopher, but the compilation of authors he cites form a powerful argument for embracing ambiguity and uncertainty which includes our fear of death All the goal setting we do, all the positive visualizations, are attempts to nail down a secure surprise free future This is probably not news to most people Yet, I enjoyed reading the various experts quoted in the book I found much of the book engaging, and not negative at all I cannot vouch for the scholarship though I just don t know enough but I can tell you that the book stays on the surface of things If you really want to know what the Greek stoics believed, you ll have to read them as directly as you can albeit in translation Buddhist beliefs, same Alan Watts, same Still, there s a lot of great ideas in this little book that can get you thinking maybe get you to the library to check out a philosophy book


  10. Richard Richard says:

    The subtitle here is the hook Happiness for People Who Can t Stand Positive Thinking Many of the ideas presented within these pages were already at least vaguely familiar to me, especially those of the Stoics and at least some of the Buddhists But, really, the word happiness is out of place Even before the Stoics existed, wise Greeks had recognized call no man happy until he is dead, and Burkeman s thrust here is that striving for happiness is almost certainly a bad idea.A better goal The subtitle here is the hook Happiness for People Who Can t Stand Positive Thinking Many of the ideas presented within these pages were already at least vaguely familiar to me, especially those of the Stoics and at least some of the Buddhists But, really, the word happiness is out of place Even before the Stoics existed, wise Greeks had recognized call no man happy until he is dead, and Burkeman s thrust here is that striving for happiness is almost certainly a bad idea.A better goal is acceptance , and several variations on that are presented This is a very good albeit not perfect book, illustrating several schools of thought that bear on the issue of happiness or contentment, or acceptance there are definite nuances.An amusing and snarky appraisal of the world of self help books and motivational speakers starts the book, but it starts delivering strongly in chapter two, What Would Seneca DoIf you look up stoicism in a dictionary, you really aren t likely to get a good grip on the concept The first definition Google hands out is the endurance of pain or hardship without a display of feelings and without complaint , but there is a fundamental flaw in that, which is that display isn t the point The second definition refers to the philosophy of Zeno, the Greek founder of the the school, and tells us Stoics will be indifferent to the vicissitudes of fortune and to pleasure and pain That still seems a bit off, but that might have to do with five hundred years of evolution from Zeno to Marcus Aurelius.Burkeman zeroes in on the same thing that Shakespeare put in the mouth of Hamlet for there is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so When you are stuck on a plane with a crying baby in the seat behind you, what makes it unbearable isn t inherent in the baby s act, but in your reception of it A Stoic will observe and negate that aspect of that reception, which makes it much easier for that hardship to be endured Not easy, no but there s a trick that helps The subtitle of the chapter is The Stoic Art of Confronting the Worst Case Scenario.Ponder the difference between a terrible situation and a merely undesirable one, and the latter becomes much easier to tolerate He extensively quotes the renowned psychologist Albert Ellis Even if you were murdered, that is very bad, but not one hundred percent bad, because several of your loved ones could meet the same fate, and that would be worse If you are tortured to death slowly, you could always be tortured to death slower So that crying baby could have been accompanied by an older kid kicking the back of your seat, and parents who are discussing the wit and wisdom of, say, a political pundit whom you despise And the flight could be from New York to Sydney, instead of merely to Los Angeles.This trick comes into play later on, as well The motivational gurus would have us only think positive thoughts, but the lesson here is that we could easily be better off by examining the negative that worst case scenario After all, someone fixated on the best outcome imaginable will be disappointed muchoften It could be asserted that focusing on the positive helps one push harder to attain one s goals, but the evidence for that is pretty weak A later chapter The Museum of Failure reminds us of the effect, here, of the survivor s bias people that don t succeed seldom are eager to talk about it, so we get the distorted of what conditions pertain to success.I found the next chapter, on the Buddhist take on this problem, to be moderately enlightening I ve always been attracted to Buddhism, and in the past year or so I ve realized why When I think of Buddhism, I pretty much narrow it down to Stoicism plus Meditation There are quite obviously many ways in which this is gonna be wrong, but I m comfortable with it There are aspects that completely repel me To the Buddha the entire teaching is just the understanding of dukkha, the unsatisfactory nature of all phenomenal existence, and the understanding of the way out of this unsatisfactoriness I mean, I just don t think existence is all that bad I suspect things were worse in India twenty five centuries ago, though I m not sure how accurate he is, but Burkeman explains a key difference between the acceptance of the Stoic and that of the Buddhist The perfect Stoic adapts his or her thinking so as to remain undisturbed by undesirable circumstances the perfect Buddhist sees thinking itself as just another set of circumstances, to be non judgmentally observed. Got it One is saying, Meh, could be worse I m not gonna let this bother me, and the other, Oh, observe, young grasshopper your mind is experiencing pain because of that arrow sticking out of your thigh Amusing, is it not, what tricks the material world plays upon us But I don t think that all of existence is suffering, and I plan to continue to perceive bad and good as judgmentally distinct So, given that, I m firmly in the Stoic camp, right Well, remember part of that definition Indifferent to the vicissitudes of fortune and to pleasure and pain I don t really want to be indifferent for pleasure Next time I ve got a dentist jabbing my mouth with sharp things, I ll try to use the Jedi Vulcan Stoic Mind Trick to remain unperturbed by my suffering But next time I m up in the mountains, gawping at the magnificence of snowmelt crashing over granite cliffs, I certainly don t want to preceive that as merely another set of circumstances To the analytically inclined, my goal would be to focus this skillon the unpleasant side of the Gaussian distribution of life experiences.The next few chapters engage in some specious over intellectualizing along with some very good stuff The central idea returns,or less, to the introductory chapter s dismissal of striving for happiness, although the goal being strived for shifts to security or success , etc To strive is, obviously, not the same as to attain And for many goals, the dilemma is that the act of striving can work against the attainment The author interviews the security expert Bruce Schneier whose fairly recent book I gave five stars to, and I ll plug here in noting that the efforts of the developed world to feel safe in the last dozen years has almost certainly rendered us objectively less safe, in addition to other costs, some of them worse A visit to the staggeringly poor slum of Kibera part of Nairobi helps remind us that happiness doesn t correlate strongly with wealth, and surprise those who see wealth as a primary goal are probably among the least happy of all of us.The bad logic comes in when he tries to make the case that we are all one Well, he denies that precise formulation, but there s a lot like that I mean stuff like this There cannot be a you without an everything else , and attempting to think about one in isolation from the other makes no sense I don t want to belabor this review with that, though The book is very good in spite of it, so just wade through the mystical junk and everything will be fine.When you get to the Museum of Failure, he s back on pretty firm ground The chapter ends with an excerpt from the famous commencement speech J.K Rowling made at Harvard in 2008 text, video , in which she talks up the benefits of failure Burkeman rightly differentiates two ideas Those that think like our sneered at motivational speakers will argue that failure is inevitable on the way to the top, and expecting it and getting over it is healthy Living in San Francisco, I swear almost every time I hear an entrepreneur speak they re touting their failures like merit badges But that still focuses on the striving, not on acceptance, and for most of us there is no pot of gold at the end of the rainbow The other perspective is the one that Rowling also points to absolute failure is liberating Yeah, duh, it is indeed a little ironic, given that it liberated Rowling to become staggeringly successful and wealthy You can think of it as something like there s no way to go but up , but that isn t the point If your goal is still up , then you ve missed the point.The book ends well with the last chapter, Memento Mori Death is, after all, the ultimate failure Steve Jobs is quoted, aptly Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose You are already naked This returns nicely to the lessons of the Stoics the Roman general who chose to have a slave walk behind him in his victory parade whispering Look behind you Remember that you are a man Remember that you ll die was probably a Stoic.Burkeman visited Mexico during the D a de los Muertos festivities in order to witness a culture that retains greater intimacy with death This is timely, of course, since Hallowe en is just days away, and here in San Francisco we take this holiday very seriously I ve decided I m going to visit the Mission District tomorrow and pick up some sugar skulls and maybe some tequila.I can recommend this book pretty highly But, apropos that closing chapter, I also recommend you download and listen to the Radiolab from this past January on The Bitter End , and make your plans accordingly remember that you will die.Oh, and a bit of humor Burkeman begins his tale by studying how motivational speakers and self help authors typically worship at the alter of success and optimism and how this is ephemeral blah blah blah , and later examines how accommodating oneself to failure and eventual death can be psychologically beneficial So I was primed and amused when this showed up within my event horizon


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The Antidote: Happiness for People Who Can't Stand Positive Thinking ➸ [Reading] ➺ The Antidote: Happiness for People Who Can't Stand Positive Thinking By Oliver Burkeman ➭ – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Self help books don t seem to work Few of the many advantages of modern life seem capable of lifting our collective mood Wealth even if you can get it doesn t necessarily lead to happiness Romance, fa Self help books don t seem to Happiness for PDF/EPUB ã work Few of the many advantages of modern life seem capable The Antidote: Epub / of lifting our collective mood Wealth even if you can get it doesn t necessarily lead to happiness Romance, Antidote: Happiness for MOBI ò family life, and work often bring as much stress as joy We can t even agree on what happiness means So are we engaged in a futile pursuit Or are we just going about it the wrong way Looking both east and west, in bulletins from the past and from far afield, Oliver Burkeman introduces us to an unusual group of people who share a single, surprising way of thinking about life Whether experimental psychologists, terrorism experts, Buddhists, hardheaded business consultants, Greek philosophers, or modern day gurus, they argue that in our personal lives, and in society at large, it s our constant effort to be happy that is making us miserable And that there is an alternative path to happiness and success that involves embracing failure, pessimism, insecurity, and uncertainty the very things we spend our lives trying to avoid Thought provoking, counterintuitive, and ultimately uplifting, The Antidote is the intelligent person s guide to understanding the much misunderstood idea of happiness.

    The Antidote: Happiness for People Who Can't Stand means So are we engaged in a futile pursuit Or are we just going about it the wrong way Looking both east and west, in bulletins from the past and from far afield, Oliver Burkeman introduces us to an unusual group of people who share a single, surprising way of thinking about life Whether experimental psychologists, terrorism experts, Buddhists, hardheaded business consultants, Greek philosophers, or modern day gurus, they argue that in our personal lives, and in society at large, it s our constant effort to be happy that is making us miserable And that there is an alternative path to happiness and success that involves embracing failure, pessimism, insecurity, and uncertainty the very things we spend our lives trying to avoid Thought provoking, counterintuitive, and ultimately uplifting, The Antidote is the intelligent person s guide to understanding the much misunderstood idea of happiness."/>
  • Paperback
  • 236 pages
  • The Antidote: Happiness for People Who Can't Stand Positive Thinking
  • Oliver Burkeman
  • English
  • 03 June 2017
  • 1847678661

About the Author: Oliver Burkeman

Is a well known author, some of Happiness for PDF/EPUB ã his books are a fascination for readers like in the The The Antidote: Epub / Antidote: Happiness for People Who Can't Stand Positive Thinking book, this is one of the most wanted Oliver Burkeman Antidote: Happiness for MOBI ò author readers around the world.