Georges Vanier: Soldier: The Wartime Letters and Diaries,



10 thoughts on “Georges Vanier: Soldier: The Wartime Letters and Diaries, 1915-1919

  1. Caer Glas Caer Glas says:

    An interesting look at the wartime experiences of Georges Vanier, a future diplomat and Governor General of Canada Although it is a fairly good record of his time in the 22nd Battalion Van Doos , it suffers a bit from the fact that Vanier was writing for his siblings and parents, so he dishes less dirt about the CEF and its personalties than did Agar Adamson of the PPCLI, whose letters to his wife were also collected and issued as a book.Still, an interesting perspective on Canada and WWI, esp An interesting look at the wartime experiences of Georges Vanier, a future diplomat and Governor General of Canada Although it is a fairly good record of his time in the 22nd Battalion Van Doos , it suffers a bit from the fact that Vanier was writing for his siblings and parents, so he dishes less dirt about the CEF and its personalties than did Agar Adamson of the PPCLI, whose letters to his wife were also collected and issued as a book.Still, an interesting perspective on Canada and WWI, especially as it is from the French Canadian experience of the war, which gets little notice unfortunately


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Georges Vanier: Soldier: The Wartime Letters and Diaries, 1915-1919 ➸ [Read] ➳ Georges Vanier: Soldier: The Wartime Letters and Diaries, 1915-1919 By Georges Vanier ➽ – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk East Sandling Camp June Captain Boyer and I are leaving for London to buy a motor car for the regiment We will be staying at the Savoy Flanders October Diary entry pm Returned to the trenches Af East Sandling CampJuneCaptain Boyer and I are leaving Soldier: The Epub Û for London to Georges Vanier: ePUB í buy a motor car for the regiment We will be staying at Vanier: Soldier: The PDF ´ the Savoy FlandersOctoberDiary entry pm Returned to the trenches After two days of rain, they are in a deplorable state There is mud up to our knees The parapets have collapsed in several spots The nights are frigid, our feet are cold, and we have not yet received our supplies of wood and charcoal In the fieldAugustYou will pardon the brevity and the looseness of this letter when you know under what conditions it has been written What you wish to know above all I can tell you at once I am well in fact I do not think I have ever been quite so well in body and in spirit I have been protected in a special manner during the last three days I have seen so many narrow escapes myself that I am beginning to think that one should not worry much about possible eventualities NoBritish Red Cross Hospital, BoulogneSeptemberBy this time you will have received reassuring cablegrams and field postcards and possibly letters from friends of mine First, to be quite frank, I will admit that I have not been in fit condition to write a coherent letter.