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Enrique's Journey (The Young Adult Adaptation): The True Story of a Boy Determined to Reunite with His Mother [PDF / Epub] ☃ Enrique's Journey (The Young Adult Adaptation): The True Story of a Boy Determined to Reunite with His Mother By Sonia Nazario – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk A heartwrenching account Provides a human face, both beautiful and scarred, for the undocumented A must read Kirkus Reviews, StarredAdapted for young people, this edition of Enrique s Journey is writt A heartwrenching account Provides a human face, both beautiful and scarred, for the undocumented A must read Kirkus Reviews, StarredAdapted for young people, this edition of Enrique s Journey is written by Sonia Nazario and based on the adult book of the same name It is the true story of Enrique, a teenager from Honduras, who sets out on a journey, braving hardship and peril, to find his mother, who had no choice but to leave him when he was a child and go to the United States in search of work Enrique s story will bring to light the daily struggles of migrants, legal and otherwise, and the complicated choices they face simply trying to survive and provide for the basic needs of their families The issues seamlessly interwoven into this gripping nonfiction work for young people are perfect for common core discussion Includes anpage photo insert as well as an epilogue that describes what has happened to Enrique and his family since the adult edition was published Enrique s Journey is also available in a Spanish language edition, translated by Ana Ras Nazario s straightforward journalistic writing style largely serves the complex, sprawling story effectively A valuable addition to young adult collections School Library Journal This powerfully written survival story personalizes the complicated, pervasive, and heart wrenching debates about immigration and immigrants rights and will certainly spark discussion in the classroom and at home BooklistAn NCSS CBC Notable Social Studies Trade Book for Young People A Kirkus Reviews Best Teen Book of the YearA Junior Library Guild Selection From the Hardcover edition.


10 thoughts on “Enrique's Journey (The Young Adult Adaptation): The True Story of a Boy Determined to Reunite with His Mother

  1. Brina Brina says:

    This September I will be honoring Hispanic Heritage Month by reading Hispanic authored books across many genres Although the official month does not begin until September 15, I have a wide, varied lineup of books planned out and decided to get off to an early start Enrique s Journey The Story of a Boy s Dangerous Odyssey to Reunite with His Mother by Sonia Nazario was originally a series of Los Angeles Times articles by the author over a span of five years Winning the Pulitzer for feature re This September I will be honoring Hispanic Heritage Month by reading Hispanic authored books across many genres Although the official month does not begin until September 15, I have a wide, varied lineup of books planned out and decided to get off to an early start Enrique s Journey The Story of a Boy s Dangerous Odyssey to Reunite with His Mother by Sonia Nazario was originally a series of Los Angeles Times articles by the author over a span of five years Winning the Pulitzer for feature reporting as well as additional awards for her work, Nazario details the complexity of decisions made by Central Americans when they choose to leave home for the luxuries of El Norte.One morning while preparing for work, Nazario happened to have a poignant conversation with her housekeeper about children From this talk, Nazario found out that her Honduran native employee had not seen her four children in over ten years since she came to the United States in a search of a better life Intrigued, the seeds were planted for Nazario to research why Central American women flock to the north, leaving their children behind with relatives, in hope that their children would eventually have a better life than the one left behind Nazario decided to target a teenager who followed his mother north and investigate the pluses and minuses to life in Honduras and the United States Her search lead her to seventeen year old Enrique and his mother Lourdes, who had already been in the States for over ten years After meeting Enrique and Lourdes, the reporter decided to recreate his journey in order to bring to light the dangers of immigrating to the United States.Honduras is a country of few wealthy and many impoverished with the few controlling most of the nation s wealth Healthy men leave for the north, leaving a population of women and their children Most women in Lourdes situation have littlethan a fourth grade education because they are expected to work to help with their families finances Once these women come of age, they have few opportunities to work, either making tortillas, selling their crafts, or obtaining menial factory jobs As a result, they can barely make ends meet and the cycle of poverty repeats itself Women decide to make a dangerous trip north, hoping that they will have enough money to either bring their children to live with them or to build a better future in Central America Children like Enrique grow up in the care of relatives and come to resent their parents, and many, when they reach an old enough age, make the same trek north.Nazario decided to make the trip atop train cars in hopes of showing just how dangerous the journey is for those hoping to immigrate to the United States She had the luxury of protection from the Mexican authorities as well as the choice to check into a motel at any point along her trip Enrique and people like him face many dangers deportation, gangs in both Central America and Northern Mexico, jailing, hunger, and grave injuries at the hands of the trains that they hope will carry them to a better life The ones who do make it become illegal immigrants They resent the parents who they hoped to reconnect with in the first place and many only obtain the same menial work they could have had in their native countries Many teen boys join gangs and girls craving attention become pregnant All wonder why their parents left them and did not stay in their native countries in the first place I found Enrique s Journey The Story of a Boy s Dangerous Odyssey to Reunite with His Mother to be a compelling story yet one written like an extended newspaper article rather than well crafted book The story showed Nazario s skill as a human interest writer as the prose was written in basic sentence structure and read quickly I felt for a young Enrique who had to grow up without parents yet grew frustrated with him as he made poor life choices leading up to his immigration The research and facts about immigration ended up beingintriguing than the actual story as Nazario tells about the toll that illegal immigrants and their often times legal children take on American taxpayers This number continues to rise as immigrants continue to flock to the United States and have children at a higher rate than native born Americans Although this book is from ten years ago, the topic is as relevant as ever as immigration continues to dominate the headlines Nazario leaves readers with these thoughts to ponder as she does not wrap up Enrique s story as neatly as she began it, as I rate this story 4 for the subject matter and 2.5 for the writing


  2. Diana Diana says:

    Stuff I already knew The US Mexico border sucks and there are lots of shady people making lots of money off of it People leave their countries and come to the US because they are dirt poor and can t support their familiesStuff I didn t already know but learned from this book The Mexico Guatemala border sounds like it s even worse than ours not necessarily in terms of how difficult it is to cross, but rather, in the absolute brutality of the gangs and bandits that prey on migrants Speak Stuff I already knew The US Mexico border sucks and there are lots of shady people making lots of money off of it People leave their countries and come to the US because they are dirt poor and can t support their familiesStuff I didn t already know but learned from this book The Mexico Guatemala border sounds like it s even worse than ours not necessarily in terms of how difficult it is to cross, but rather, in the absolute brutality of the gangs and bandits that prey on migrants Speaking of brutality, I wasn t aware that Mexico even had an immigration police, nor was I aware of the vast amount of Central Americans they deport back to Guatemala, nor the frequency of deportations 8 busloads a day Mexicans treat Central Americans the way Americans treat Mexicans like dirty foreign trash That being said, I was absolutely overwhelmed by the compassion that some Mexicans show toward the migrants especially in certainradical churches and from people who live near the railroad tracks There was one amazing woman who took care of amputees who lots their limbs in accidents usually while trying to board trains or from falling off trains I was absolutely blown away by their faith and love for their fellow man.I also think that the book detailed the psychological effects of family separation This should definitely be read by lawmakers because I know that any upcoming immigration reform will be based on family reunification This book makes an excellent case for that type of reform My only complaint is that the writing wasn t particularly amazing, but the plot of the story just about tells itself I definitely tore through this book and I m not the fastest reader READ IT I think it would explain a lot of things to people who know nothing about why these people come to our country and would hopefully instill a little respect for what they ve been through


  3. Carol Carol says:

    Book rating social relevance 5 stars, writing 1 star.Lourdes, a single mother of 2 children, makes the decision to leave her homeland of Honduras for the United States to support her family She leaves behind Belky daughter, 8 years old and Enrique son, 5 years old in the care of two different relatives Eleven years later, Enrique, sets out to find her The book details Enriques harrowing 4 month struggle to reunite with his mother The book details the perils of immigrants from trains, ba Book rating social relevance 5 stars, writing 1 star.Lourdes, a single mother of 2 children, makes the decision to leave her homeland of Honduras for the United States to support her family She leaves behind Belky daughter, 8 years old and Enrique son, 5 years old in the care of two different relatives Eleven years later, Enrique, sets out to find her The book details Enriques harrowing 4 month struggle to reunite with his mother The book details the perils of immigrants from trains, bandits, corrupt local police, INS migra agents government agents who patrol for illegal immigrants , smugglers hired men who take illegal immigrants to the US The book was difficult to read so much suffering, but highly relevant for today s world I m glad I read the book.There were many things about the book that bothered me Author was repetitious, ie she introduces you to Enrique s sister Belky about once every 20 pages She repeats how dangerous it is to ride trains, riders often loose limbs and sometimes die This is mentioned in just about every chapter with the author detailing specific full names of victims and locations The author gives a lot of details about supporting evidence with many facts about the acts of brutality and kindness This seems to clog up the book Oddly Enrique is treated the same we just learn in a cook book style what happens to him Author does not give last names for any family members, does not develop Enrique on a personal level There could be such richness to this story but the author does not let us emotionally attach to any individual Sentences are short and static Unfortunately this made the reading rather dull.This book was a part of the University of Wisconsin Go Big Read Due to the writing style, I feared Sonia Nazario s lecture would be dull as well I didn t attend the campus lecture.This web site give an update as to where Enrique and his family are now.http www.enriquesjourney.com family


  4. Amber Amber says:

    Everyone in the US should read this book in order to understand the dangerous journey that Central American immigrants make in order to work in the US This is not a book that tries to persuade you to feel one way or another about immigration It is simply about one boy s journey through Mexico on top of trains and the perils that surround him He has many flaws, but a deep desire to reunite with his mother who immigrated to the US when he was 6 and to send money back home to his family in Hon Everyone in the US should read this book in order to understand the dangerous journey that Central American immigrants make in order to work in the US This is not a book that tries to persuade you to feel one way or another about immigration It is simply about one boy s journey through Mexico on top of trains and the perils that surround him He has many flaws, but a deep desire to reunite with his mother who immigrated to the US when he was 6 and to send money back home to his family in Honduras This book reminds us that as much as we speak about immigration in terms of economic costs benefits, it is ultimately a human issue


  5. Audrephilia Audrephilia says:

    I can t believe how gruesome, violent, and nearly hopeless the journey is from South America to America I mean, I thought all hispanic people snuck in with a few dangers The news makes it sound like getting into America is easy as pie for migrants I was so shocked to read that there s approximately a 0% chance of traveling via train and on foot without encountering horrific violence, debilitating injuries from boarding and unboarding the train, rape, robbery, and or many other nightmare scena I can t believe how gruesome, violent, and nearly hopeless the journey is from South America to America I mean, I thought all hispanic people snuck in with a few dangers The news makes it sound like getting into America is easy as pie for migrants I was so shocked to read that there s approximately a 0% chance of traveling via train and on foot without encountering horrific violence, debilitating injuries from boarding and unboarding the train, rape, robbery, and or many other nightmare scenarios There is NO chance someone traveling this way will avoid all of those things It doesn t happen to some, a few, or most At least one but like multiple of those things absolutely will happen and that is so fucking upsetting From the gangs that board trains to the motherfucking POLICE that do it, it s such an unbelievably brutal and impossible trip Enrique had to start over what, 8 times When he wasn t caught and deported, he was just beaten within a half centimeter of life There s no denying that it is a certainly perilous endeavor People starving in these countries, desperate for hope, SOME way to make some money, SOME way to be able to send money for their children hear that it s dangerous and probably think what we up here in the land of mostly sososo much think Yeah, it s dangerous, if you re not careful No, it s dangerous PERIOD If you re a girl on the train, plan your psychological coping with rape Just go ahead and mark it on your day planner If it isn t immediately stolen in Chiapas by the lowest human life forms ever Before they push you off the train and lose you a leg, arm, or head to the vortex at the wheels and tracks The lucky prosperous can afford smugglers coyotes or traffickers who are savvy and have transportation and know all the best ways to get into the States They cost thousands And the most the average South American can seem to save up is in the hundreds, especially without a very devout benefactor already in the U.S and wiring back copious amounts of money You know all that money we pay illegals And how well they live I mean, it s a dream to some of them, but by our own standards, it s repugnant Both perspectives were interesting Why Lourdes left her children to come here and the outrageous struggles she faced Being scammed and robbed by Americans who say, We can help you get papers We can help you get your children papers Only 1200 All you have in the world is 800 We ll take that, then their whole business disappears overnight I felt horrible for her Then Enrique living in Honduras, never enough or any of most things, selling spices in town, feeling abandoned by his mother I sympathized with him, too.When they re reunited, I kind of found them both to be dicks Enrique was a smarmy brat who when he wasn t criticizing his mother for abandoning him and wasting money on luxuries spent his time and money on weed, beer, topless bars, and paint thinners to get his huff on Getting DUIs that cost 1000 Lourdes never indulged in those things, but I guess that didn t occur to him He could NOT stop his venomous tirades against Lourdes for leaving him in Honduras, but spends days calling Maria Isabel his girlfriend and babymama in Honduras begging her to come to the U.S and leave their 3 year old behind He says it s what s best for their daughter I also didn t wholly sympathize with Lourdes who felt the money and objects she sent back to Honduras for her children was love That she thinks Honduras is a disgusting, lawless, horrible place But it s totes cool that her two kids are there without her And she got pregnant when she moved here Genius move Even though they have MANY faults, some of them enormous, it s still egregious that there s almost a system of necessity for leaving children behind, coming here, sending back money, and never seeing their kids again I never thought about it When I went to wire money once for a friend, I stood in a long line behind hispanic people Never thought about it I really have no idea what should be done about this, other than HUGELY relaxing immigration laws Immigrants don t take anything from us They work jobs Americans don t want isn t just a sound byte It s true Look what happened right here in Alabama We re still affected by unemployment like the rest of this country in our recession, but who poured in at farms to replace the crop pickers run out of the state by our fascist immigration laws NO ONE Yep, fucking NO ONE Those farms are in astronomically dire straits now because of it Not only that, but they pay our taxes If they have utilities or ever buy anything here, they pay them, but reap very few of the benefits that legal citizens do We can t go to Honduras, Peru, Mexico, Guatemala, ANY of those places and tell them to make their country better To make it habitable To look out for the vulnerable populations So what we can do is make our own countryaccessible, for the love of Jesus Even though his name sounds suspiciously hispanic No one should have to experience the things people do on that trip north


  6. Ryan Ryan says:

    I learned a lot about illegal immigration from reading Sonia Nazario s Enrique s Journey Nazario, a distinguished journalist for the Los Angeles Times very much takes a features approach in her writing, emphasizing the human stories and motivations that create the statistics.It certainly makes for a compelling read Enrique s story starts in Honduras with his mother, Lourdes Lourdes cannot afford to feed and educate her children, so she leaves for el norte Her plan is to work hard, save m I learned a lot about illegal immigration from reading Sonia Nazario s Enrique s Journey Nazario, a distinguished journalist for the Los Angeles Times very much takes a features approach in her writing, emphasizing the human stories and motivations that create the statistics.It certainly makes for a compelling read Enrique s story starts in Honduras with his mother, Lourdes Lourdes cannot afford to feed and educate her children, so she leaves for el norte Her plan is to work hard, save money, and return home Things don t go expected her husband marries another woman, abandons the children of this marriage to his mother, and Enrique comes to deeply resent his mother even while idolizing her By the time he s 17, his girlfriend is pregnant, he is sniffing glue, and he has been kicked out of several households Enrique decides to follow in his mother s footsteps I think it would be fair to say that he feels as though without her love, he will never be complete.Migrants like Enrique travel by train Readers from North ern America are predisposed to romanticize people that ride the rails, but it sdangerous than we might expect In addition to gangs and bandits, Enrique has to dodge corrupt police officers and, of course, la migra I lost count of how often Enrique was deported from Guatemala before he finally made it to Mexico and started getting deported again He is severely beaten at one point as well Nazario emphasizes that gang rape and decapitation by train wheels are common occurrences However, Enrique is on a quest to reunite with his mother, and he endures.It is difficult not to become discouraged while reading about all of the people that prey upon the migrants However, Nazario highlights several instances in which people, often motivated by Jesus teachings to care for the poor, demonstrate remarkable charity and self sacrifice.It s also disappointing to read that life in America is not all its cracked up to be Children that do manage to reunite with their mothers soon become disillusioned by many realities For one, their mothers are not ideal, and they still have to work hard rather than spend time with their parents, which aggravates the children s sense of abandonment and deepens their resentment The mothers, Nazario explains, are not inclined to apologize, viewing their actions as a sacrifice their children cannot understand These children often turn to drugs, gangs, or pregnancy to find the love that they feel they are missing.I m often frustrated when reading the newspaper by how easily journalists are manipulated into spreading a corporate or political message Here, Nazario seems to have presented a balanced picture I couldn t think of anyone that she should have spenttime interviewing, excepting perhaps policy makers She herself follows in Enrique s footsteps, though with guards and visas She quite effectively illustrates the hardship of this migration while also pointing out the resources that Americans spend responding to this phenomenon.In many ways, this makes for an emotional reading experience To what extent is it informative I would have preferred to seediscussion and consideration of Nazario s claims about immigration She often throws out statistics about immigration, and I found myself often frustrated by the lack of detail or analysis At times, she seems to use the term immigrant to refer to both legal and illegal immigrants, which I think confuses the issue Nazario s notes are quite transparent in the sense that she explains where her claims come from, but still do not really break down how her sources conflict and compliment each other Considering that this is not an academic text, perhaps the greatest absence is that there is no section that highlights further reading on this issue.Ultimately, I found that Enrique s Journey provided a human context for a form of migration that most newspapers outline with statistics I did find myself thinking that I could understand why so many people would risk so much to travel illegally into the land of the free And I was impressed by her decision to travel the rails, even if she was guarded


  7. Peter Derk Peter Derk says:

    Well, I hated it.It s kind of hard to say that because of the book s subject matter It makes me feel like I m saying the subject matter wasn t important It s sort of like being in a writing class where someone writes a non fiction piece about a past trauma It s hard to talk about the problems with the piece without feeling like you re invalidating the events and the person in some way.That said, hated it It didn t have so much a narrative as it read like a list, a catalouging of atrocities Well, I hated it.It s kind of hard to say that because of the book s subject matter It makes me feel like I m saying the subject matter wasn t important It s sort of like being in a writing class where someone writes a non fiction piece about a past trauma It s hard to talk about the problems with the piece without feeling like you re invalidating the events and the person in some way.That said, hated it It didn t have so much a narrative as it read like a list, a catalouging of atrocities The only reason I read it was for a book club, and the only reason I finished it is because I downloaded the audiobook and listened to it at 2X speed on my iPod which I didn t even know was an option, and now that I do I can t figure out what use that option has other than this exact sort of thing.Also, it really felt like ten separate pieces of journalism slapped inside a cover.And finally, I have to say, I m sort of disappointed in this as the pick for One Book, One Denver It just feels like the kind of book that these programs always pick Something that addresses an issue, which I understand We want people to have something to talk about On the other hand, it feels like we re trying to force people to read things for information s sake as opposed to reading things that are enjoyable as books on some level Which is why we still have boring books and textbooks that are virtually unreadable I don t know This book Three Cups of Tea These kinds of books just leave me cold


  8. Ms. Montaño Ms. Montaño says:

    Enrique s Journey completely challenged my views on immigration and helped me identify the challenges that I face as a teacher Sonia Nazario begins the book by providing a background of information on the immigration policies of the 80 s and 90 s She then takes us to Honduras where a mother is about to leave her children so that she can come to the US and have a better life in order to provide a better life for her children As the years go by, the mother is faced with the decision to risk h Enrique s Journey completely challenged my views on immigration and helped me identify the challenges that I face as a teacher Sonia Nazario begins the book by providing a background of information on the immigration policies of the 80 s and 90 s She then takes us to Honduras where a mother is about to leave her children so that she can come to the US and have a better life in order to provide a better life for her children As the years go by, the mother is faced with the decision to risk her life and return to Honduras to see her children or have them risk their lives attempting to cross the US border Her children slowly lose the respect and admiration that they had for their mother as they grow up in a country filled with corruption fueled by drug and gang violence The story then takes us through the hardships of immigration as one of her children takes his chances and leaves Honduras for the US Enrique s Journey is really the story of hardship and struggle of a family trying to make their dreams come true Enrique faces the most difficult of circumstances traveling alone through the jungles of Guatemala, El Salvador and then Mexico He joins thousands of pilgrims making the same journey on top of trains, on foot and all while avoiding the immigration agents, police officers and gang members who torture immigrants during the journey In his attempts to reach the border, he learns about his own weaknesses, and the difficulties that his own mother faced when she made the journey I truly recommend this book to anyone who has ever wanted to learn about the hardships of immigration This book made me appreciate what my own mother went through when she left her country at the age of 17 I also connected with all of my students and their families who are forced to leave their loved ones and start new lives in a foreign country I rate it 5 out of 5 stars A must read for everyone


  9. Lorena Lorena says:

    I live in Oaxaca Mexico, and have lived in Veracruz and Chiapas, three places where refugees pass through from Central America to the north of Mexico, or to the United States These locations figure prominently in Nazario s amazing book I read it some years ago, just after I had moved to Mexico Shortly afterward I visited California and was eating in a big Mexican restaurant in SF Because I had just recently read Enrique s Journey I talked to some of the women who were cleaning off the tabl I live in Oaxaca Mexico, and have lived in Veracruz and Chiapas, three places where refugees pass through from Central America to the north of Mexico, or to the United States These locations figure prominently in Nazario s amazing book I read it some years ago, just after I had moved to Mexico Shortly afterward I visited California and was eating in a big Mexican restaurant in SF Because I had just recently read Enrique s Journey I talked to some of the women who were cleaning off the table and found that all of them were mothers from Central America who were sending money home It gave me a big pain in my heart.More than the story of this boy s journey, a child who rode on the top of trains from Guatemala to the US border, it is the story of Sonia Nazario s heroic commitment She herself took this journey so that she could tell it, and the gripping descriptions of what it s like are unforgettable.Even though Enrique s experience of losing his mother is common throughout Central America, the tragedy continues Chidren who thought their mothers would return finally give up and make the dangerous journey themselves to the border The connection they feel to that mother is so powerful that they believe somehow they will find her once they are on the right side of la frontera, but they almost never do Instead they end up on the street, taken as child prostitutes, or adopted by gangs Highly recommend


  10. Sheryl Sheryl says:

    This is not a book It s a report It s straight forward reporting and I admire her efforts to get the full experience, but the ongoing repetition of the same kind of details to make her point was overkill for the general public.


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