The World's Most Dangerous Place: Inside the Outlaw State


The World's Most Dangerous Place: Inside the Outlaw State of Somalia ✺ [BOOKS] ✮ The World's Most Dangerous Place: Inside the Outlaw State of Somalia By James Fergusson ❄ – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk The Horn of Africa is the most alarming and least known of all the fronts in the seemingly endless war on terror And in Somalia, where James Fergusson fearlessly dares to tread, the soldiers of Al Sha The Most Dangerous Place: Inside PDF \ Horn of Africa is the most alarming Most Dangerous Kindle Ò and least known of all the fronts in the seemingly endless war on terror And in Somalia, where James Fergusson fearlessly dares to tread, the soldiers of Al Shabaab fight a guerrilla war with The World's Kindle - the firm backing of Al Qaida, as well as shadowy links to the pirates who patrol the Somalian coastNow for the first time, James gets to the heart of Somalia s issues Who are Al Shabaab What do they want And how much World's Most Dangerous PDF ✓ of a threat do they pose to their home nation and to the wider world Informative, compassionate and often deeply shocking, the answers to these questions will change the way you see the world around you.

    Download Book Best Sellers in PDF format a threat do they pose to their home nation and to the wider world Informative, compassionate and often deeply shocking, the answers to these questions will change the way you see the world around you."/>
  • Paperback
  • 416 pages
  • The World's Most Dangerous Place: Inside the Outlaw State of Somalia
  • James Fergusson
  • English
  • 20 July 2019
  • 059306836X

About the Author: James Fergusson

Librarian Most Dangerous Place: Inside PDF \ Note There isthan one author in the Most Dangerous Kindle Ò GoodReads database with this name See this thread forinformation.



10 thoughts on “The World's Most Dangerous Place: Inside the Outlaw State of Somalia

  1. Chris Chris says:

    This was unexpectedly outstanding I picked this up on a whim, for a variety of reasons I enjoy reading books written by journalists, for one They tend to have a good pace for a non fiction, and feature first hand observation I also live in Columbus, Ohio, which is a major center for the Somali diaspora I work in a public library, and a large number of our customers are Somali When you have a large insular subculture in your area, I think it is helpful to try to understand them I hope that This was unexpectedly outstanding I picked this up on a whim, for a variety of reasons I enjoy reading books written by journalists, for one They tend to have a good pace for a non fiction, and feature first hand observation I also live in Columbus, Ohio, which is a major center for the Somali diaspora I work in a public library, and a large number of our customers are Somali When you have a large insular subculture in your area, I think it is helpful to try to understand them I hope that doesn t sound paternalistic, because I don t at all mean it that way Understanding Somalia, and what these people have left behind, gives me a better window into this culture that is nearby, yet so far away.The book is primarily centered in 2011 and 2012, when the author traveled to several cities in Somalia, in an attempt to experience the realities of life there Mogadishu in particular was horrifying to me A Stalingrad that has lasted a decade He also travels to various parts of the world to meet members of the diaspora, including Kenya, Minnesota, and London, UK where he lives, so it might be cheating to count that.Overall, a great analysis of the current political and economic situation in Somalia, the status of the diaspora, and their connections with al Shabaab, the Islamist rebel group controlling much of southern Somalia

  2. Nick Nick says:

    In the aftermath of the U.S President s insult of a Somali born U.S Congresswoman who, unlike him, was elected by a majority of the voters in her jurisdiction , let me say that in the course of teaching English to refugees and studying medical interpreting, I have met a few Somali women They struck me as studious, desirous of and successful at learning English quickly, with great dignity, and grateful to live in a country not shattered by violence Even with the bombing this weekend, Somalia In the aftermath of the U.S President s insult of a Somali born U.S Congresswoman who, unlike him, was elected by a majority of the voters in her jurisdiction , let me say that in the course of teaching English to refugees and studying medical interpreting, I have met a few Somali women They struck me as studious, desirous of and successful at learning English quickly, with great dignity, and grateful to live in a country not shattered by violence Even with the bombing this weekend, Somalia seems a bit less dangerous than it was when James Fergusson published his book in 2013 the piracy in particular seems to have abated Fergusson s book is both detailed and broad, a rare account from the various regional governments at least as they existed at the beginning of the decade and refugee communities from Britain to Minneapolis the portions on refugee communities include not just the usual details of radicalized youth, but especially those who with courage and tenacity struggle to reach their fellow Somalis to adapt and thrive Fergusson s account of how the Somali clans and large number of sub clans evolve, interact or fight each other is clear, a real achievement The book is also a telling reminder of how destructive foreign intervention is colonialism, from the odd couple of the British and Italians, introducing modern weapons, destabilizing traditional structures, and drawing arbitrary boundaries Al Shabaab, with its Saudi influenced ideology and not without factions stepping into the chaos following the defeat of Mohammed Siad Barre, one of those dictators who chooses ideology based on who will supply him with loads of weapons When the Russians abandoned him for the Ethiopians whose territory Siad Barre invaded, he turned American military gifts on his own people The image of Somali that most Americans remember, Blackhawk Down , with the desecration of the bodies of American servicemen, resulted in that time honored trope of Hollywood the dark skinned, bloodthirsty savages Anyone who dies in the service of a nation, especially on a humanitarian mission, deserves the highest honors, but in honoring those servicemen who died in Mogadishu we should also remember that they were part of an operation, that, Fergusson argues, saved as many as a quarter of a million people from dying of starvation Sic semper Hollywood Yes, as Fergusson details, there is frightening violence in Somalia, for no one so much as the Somalis But, I think his even handed, thorough, and clear investigation and writing also remind us how destructive it is to reduce a complex situation and a whole people to an easy label, a stereotype cobbled together from glances at newspapers and Hollywood moneymakers The consequences may be on the other side of the world but that in no way offers absolution

  3. John John says:

    Seattle has a fairly large Somali population, so I thought I would try this book to get a better handle on what s going on with them Unfortunately, it readlike a very long magazine article I hate to say it but on balance I found the story rather dry not really general interest, as much as for cultural anthropologists and foreign policy wonks.

  4. Catherine Catherine says:

    I picked up this book at the library after reading A House in the Sky which I highly recommend I found this book to be pretty dry but if you are interested in the region it does a good job of explaining the devastating reality that is Somalia.

  5. Laura Laura says:

    It is small wonder that so many Somalis blame outsiders for their country s ills If Afghanistan is the Cockpit of Asia , as the Viceroy of India Lord Curzon once said, then Somalia is Africa s unfortunate equivalent, a nation strategically located at the crossroads of competing powers and ideologies, whose fate it is to be endlessly fought over by foreigners Fergusson Travelling in Ethiopia once to Dire Dawa, my plane took a short stop in Jijiga, and in through the airplane doors of this Et It is small wonder that so many Somalis blame outsiders for their country s ills If Afghanistan is the Cockpit of Asia , as the Viceroy of India Lord Curzon once said, then Somalia is Africa s unfortunate equivalent, a nation strategically located at the crossroads of competing powers and ideologies, whose fate it is to be endlessly fought over by foreigners Fergusson Travelling in Ethiopia once to Dire Dawa, my plane took a short stop in Jijiga, and in through the airplane doors of this Ethiopian Airways flight walked beautifully clad colourful women, yellows and purple hues, dark skinned and with a gap between their front teeth, tall and decidedly unEthiopian That was my first experience of the Somali community in Ethiopia And this book by James Fergusson has gone a long way in filling this huge hole in my knowledge of Somali history culture and society Although it was published now almost a decade ago, it is incredibly informative of the trials and tribulations of this amazing community, whose lands and territories were torn apart by colonial interests, and the policy of the divide and rule The five points in the star on its flag represent the five original territories where they lived the Ogaden in Ethiopia, Kenya s North Eastern Province, Somaliland, Djibouti and Southern Somalia Fergusson manages to recount his journey through these lands and with incredible ease weave historic moments and Somali poetic verses in his words A desert land, a failed state, a region devastated by climate change and religious fanaticism, sapped of its youth by a constant diaspora of minds and hearts, this country is however the point of reference and the mirage of many a Somalian whose desire is to move beyond tribalism and its inevitable divisions to reconstruct a real country, leaving behind its distorted metaphor built into the psyches of many a displaced families Fergusson s last section is dedicated to the Somali diaspora in the West, the forgotten youth in the streets of London and the States, so frequently targeted by religious fanatics He visits mosques, cafes, qat bars, youth clubs, community centres and talks to substantial numbers of people In doing so, he paints a constructive picture of Somalis, their entrepreneurial spirit and drive responsible for the upkeep of many a groups back in the homeland I am not sure where Fergusson s passion for Somalia comes from but this book definitely shows his commitment to put this once failed state irrevocably back into the layman psyche 5 stars

  6. Aurélien Thomas Aurélien Thomas says:

    First of, let s regret the easy and sensationalist title that doesn t make for a good first impression Stamping thus Somalia straight of as the world s most dangerous place , and being written by a British journalist to depict a country that hadthan his fair share of misunderstanding by the western medias I had yes, simply because of such a poor title braced myself for yet again one of those dismissive tale of an hopeless country pointing to everything wrong with Africa Well, I am gl First of, let s regret the easy and sensationalist title that doesn t make for a good first impression Stamping thus Somalia straight of as the world s most dangerous place , and being written by a British journalist to depict a country that hadthan his fair share of misunderstanding by the western medias I had yes, simply because of such a poor title braced myself for yet again one of those dismissive tale of an hopeless country pointing to everything wrong with Africa Well, I am glad I passed that and read it anyway, because it s not quite and only so.Starting when AMISOM forces fought al Shabaab in the streets of Mogadishu and, ending when al Shabaab retreated from most of their conquered territories, here indeed is a riveting reportage as interesting as it is harrowing Travelling around Somalia, sometimes at the risk of his life, the author meets from presidents to pirates, AMISOM soldiers to al Shabaab deserters and, of course, commoners of all sorts to offer a complex but fascinating snapshot of a baffling country.Sure it is, at times, gruesome, disturbing, and makes you want to weep in despair e.g the constant violence, children soldiers, the disastrous consequences of the famine It can also be frankly annoyingly unfair and simplistic as when, to try and delve into the far reaching consequences of the civil war James Fergusson meets Somali both in the UK London and the US Minneapolis to show how easily a lost generation of immigrants can slip into gangs and terrorism But, a least all this is quite balanced by his meetings with various activists at home and abroad and, most of all, his depiction of the Puntland and Somaliland, to show that successful alternatives are possible More, pointing fingers at how the West can misunderstand such a region, and therefore completely mismanaged its crisis, such reads also allows for a fair share of the blame to show why Somalia is in the poor state it is.Bitter and sad picture of a country with a tragic history Yes But it nevertheless contains some glimpses of hope for those optimistic enough to believe in possible changes All in all, an insightful reportage

  7. Epimetheus Hydoff Epimetheus Hydoff says:

    This book oulines much of the problems in Somalia superficially, but it s outdated Much has changed since 2013.

  8. Nyarie Nyarie says:

    An excellent read to say the least The book is well written and provides vivid and easily accessible accounts of the political situation in Somalia I appreciated the fact that the author did not write the book from a superior position as most Western writers do on African subjects Fergusson dissects the subject matter of Somalia s past present and future from multifaceted points of view with accounts from Somali individuals themselves which is excellent His account was raw, questioning, o An excellent read to say the least The book is well written and provides vivid and easily accessible accounts of the political situation in Somalia I appreciated the fact that the author did not write the book from a superior position as most Western writers do on African subjects Fergusson dissects the subject matter of Somalia s past present and future from multifaceted points of view with accounts from Somali individuals themselves which is excellent His account was raw, questioning, objective and analytical Fergusson through his book, takes you to Somalia and back with each turn of a page The book will leave you brainstorming about what solutions are available and pondering deeply about what the future of Somalia will be There are immense lessons to be learnt from this book on how things can go terribly wrong for a country If you have any interest on the situation in Somalia, this is the book for you even if you do not have an interest in that part of the world the book is an excellent piece of non fiction writing that will take you on a journey A definite recommend

  9. Joseph Joseph says:

    I first published this review on Cicero magazinehttp ciceromagazine.com reviews shaSince the rise of al Shabaab The Youths terrorist group, Somalia has never been far from headlines across the globe It is this troubled and tragic country that journalist James Fergusson profiles in his most recent book, The World s Most Dangerous Place Fergusson has had a diverse career, including being a press spokesman for the Office of the High Representative in Sarajevo after the Daytona Peace Accord I first published this review on Cicero magazinehttp ciceromagazine.com reviews shaSince the rise of al Shabaab The Youths terrorist group, Somalia has never been far from headlines across the globe It is this troubled and tragic country that journalist James Fergusson profiles in his most recent book, The World s Most Dangerous Place Fergusson has had a diverse career, including being a press spokesman for the Office of the High Representative in Sarajevo after the Daytona Peace Accords and he has extensive work as a journalist.Fergusson s work on Afghanistan is highly regarded, even if some of his conclusions such as the suggestion that ISAF should negotiate with the Taliban might be controversial Fergusson applies a similar on the ground approach to his latest book, but the subject this time is the Horn of Africa and not Central Asia In compiling the book Fergusson travelled across Greater Somalia from Hargeisa in the north to the Somali majority areas of Kenya in the south.When Somalia first made global headlines after the end of the Cold War, most of al Shabaab were still in theirs diapers Between 1992 and 1995, Somalia was home to the United Nation s largest international mission, UNOSOM UNOSOM s staff of 30,000 consumed an annual budget of 1.5 billion The international community seemed committed to stabilising Somalia in the spirit of pan humanism that briefly characterized the Post Cold War period Then the fateful 1993 Battle of Mogadishu occurred, best chronicled in Mark Bowden s 1999 book Black Hawk Down, and in its aftermath the international community decided that stabilizing Somalia wasn t worth the price It wasn t until the rise of the Islamic Courts Union in 2007 that Somalia again captured headlines across the world The country s status on the fringe of global news is superficially similar to Afghanistan, which is perhaps why Fergusson decided to make Somalia his next project after extensive reporting in Afghanistan.Fergusson is a good friend of British Prime Minister David Cameron and since it was published, The World s Most Dangerous Country has certainly been read in policy circles The title is a bit of a stretch no matter how we interpret dangerous Fergusson provides much insight into Somalia s woes in the book, but the argument that this is the most perilous spot on the map deserves some doubt Having travelled in the Horn of Africa, I would argue that political violence aside, the incidence of violent crime is much higher in, say, Latin America Secondly, from a geopolitical perspective Pakistan is probably the world s most dangerous state Nor is it the terrorist hotspot it once was In 2014, according to the Institute for Economics and Peace, 32,658 people were killed by terrorism, compared to 18,111 in 2013 with the top five countries being Afghanistan, Iraq, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Syria This issue aside, the strength of this book lies in the author s readiness to examine all of Somalia s problems and those of its diaspora This is one of thereadable journalistic books on an African security problem in part because of Fergusson s dedication to understanding Somali cultureThe dangerous referred to in the title might be the result of the fact that this region has been awash in small arms for decades Modern rifles were first introduced to the area by the French in large numbers during the building of the Addis Abba Djibouti railway, allowing homicidal inter tribal warfare to become genocidal page 55 During World War I, the Ottomans provided guns to Somalis willing to fight the British Following World War II, with Ethiopia in ruins and British or Allied control of what is today Kenya, Somalia, and Djibouti, there was for a brief moment an opportunity to create a true nation state Yet the vision of a Greater Somali alluded to by the five pointed star on Somalia s national flag was not realized.World War II and the Cold War brought evenWestern arms to the region This point is persuasive because few regions in Africa were as much of a geopolitical playground in the 20th century as the Greater Somali region was and the primary beneficiary of this since the end of the Cold War has been Ethiopia Indeed, the destruction of Somalia was achieved for similar geopolitical reasons as that of Ethiopia, as Somalia once fielded Africa s most capable army page 113.This is one of thereadable journalistic books on an African security problem in part because of Fergusson s dedication to understanding Somali culture he clearly studied Somali music and poetry in writing the book There is also plenty of British imperial history, with references to the Mad Mullah, Sir Francis Burton, and Gerald Hanley Fergusson talks to religious leaders, the unemployed, those press ganged into al Shabaab and those just trying to make ends meet The author also travels outside of Somalia for his research, including Somali majority areas in Kenya and Ethiopia and the wider diaspora in the UK and US.Probably the most intriguing part of the book is the time Fergusson spends in Mogadishu where he meets former al Shabaab fighters and by chance spends some time with Jerry Rawlings, the half Scottish former leader of Ghana He also spends time with frontline Ugandan units battling al Shabaab in Mogadishu The discussions with Ugandan military commanders deployed to Somalia are enlightening, though the author seems to feel that Ugandan President Museveni was primarily concerned with regional security when he sent Ugandan troops to Mogadishu Yet the inverse was true in 2006 when the decision was made for African Union troops to intervene in Somalia and today the Ugandan military believe al Shabaab is supporting anti Museveni groups like the ADF In the Horn of Africa, as in Afghanistan, all is often not as it first appears

  10. Donald Pryde Donald Pryde says:

    Bit slower than his usual books but non the less a good insight into Somalia and terrorists

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