↠ Husker Du: The Story of the Noise-Pop Pioneers Who

Husker Du: The Story of the Noise-Pop Pioneers Who Launched Modern Rock [Download] ✤ Husker Du: The Story of the Noise-Pop Pioneers Who Launched Modern Rock Author Andrew Earles – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Bob Mould, Grant Hart, and Greg Norton formed H sker D in as a wildly cathartic outfit fueled by a cocktail of anger, volume, and velocity Here s the first book to dissect the trio that countless cri Bob Mould, Grant Hart, and The Story ePUB ´ Greg Norton formed H sker D inas a wildly cathartic outfit fueled by a cocktail of anger, volume, and velocity Here s the first book to dissect the trio that countless critics and musicians have cited as one of the most influential bands of the s Husker Du: Kindle - Author Andrew Earles examines how H sker D became the first hardcore band to marry pop melodies with psychedelic influences and ear shattering volume Readers witness the band create the untouchable noise pop of LPs like New Day Rising, Flip Your Wig, and Candy Apple Grey, not to mention the sprawling double Du: The Story PDF/EPUB ✓ length Zen Arcade Few bands from the original American indie movement did to inform the alternative rock styles that breached the mainstream in the s H sker D truly were visionaries.


About the Author: Andrew Earles

Is a well known author, The Story ePUB ´ some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Husker Du: The Story of the Noise Pop Pioneers Who Launched Modern Rock book, this is one of the most wanted Andrew Earles author readers around the world.



10 thoughts on “Husker Du: The Story of the Noise-Pop Pioneers Who Launched Modern Rock

  1. Ross Creuswell Ross Creuswell says:

    Hmmm the title of this book has changed since it was added to goodreads database It s now Husker Du The Story of the Noise Pop Pioneers Who Launched Modern Rock As a die hard fan who actually saw Husker Du live in early 1986 and met Bob and Greg at the gig, I was surprised to learn how little I knew about the band Back when they were together, not much was known about them way down here in Texas in those pre internet days.This book is quite flawed but until Bob Mould finishes his memoirs i Hmmm the title of this book has changed since it was added to goodreads database It s now Husker Du The Story of the Noise Pop Pioneers Who Launched Modern Rock As a die hard fan who actually saw Husker Du live in early 1986 and met Bob and Greg at the gig, I was surprised to learn how little I knew about the band Back when they were together, not much was known about them way down here in Texas in those pre internet days.This book is quite flawed but until Bob Mould finishes his memoirs it s all we ve got Which is sad considering how extraordinary and influential this band was, and how long it s been since they broke up I give the book three stars because of the exhaustive discography and the meticulous attention to detail regarding the recordings Husker Du issued, starting with their humble beginnings in Minneapolis And also because the author managed to interview both Grant Hart and Greg Norton Grant Hart s quotes are about 85% bitter griping about Bob Mould, sadly Norton s contribution isbalanced.Where the book falls short is in the area of really conveying who these guys were as individuals and what their lives were like on the road The author spends too much time obsessing over the fine details of record label business and addressing latter day arguments over the nature of the band s legacy, which is the domain of the modern fanboy, and not enough time painting a picture of the guys as human beings and a picture of the times they lived in, which is the job of a writer.The book feels a bit at times like an Internet clip job, with entire passages repeated verbatim inthan one place, so without the input of Hart and Norton would have been an utter waste However, this is all we have about Husker Du at the moment and for a serious fan, or a younger person who is just now discovering their music and wanting a sense of where it fits in rock history, the book has value


  2. Asciigod Asciigod says:

    Andrew Earles near authorized Bob Mould refused to comment bio of the Huskers is absolutely exhaustive Unfortunately, the casual fan may find it ultimately exhausting Ha Awesome clich punning More after the jump This is the type of book that is an ultra fan s wet dream It puts into narrative form the obscure, compulsive lists, cross references and premium on completionist zeal that is the white hot ichor sustaining the life of the obsessive fan.And to that specific audience, this boo Andrew Earles near authorized Bob Mould refused to comment bio of the Huskers is absolutely exhaustive Unfortunately, the casual fan may find it ultimately exhausting Ha Awesome clich punning More after the jump This is the type of book that is an ultra fan s wet dream It puts into narrative form the obscure, compulsive lists, cross references and premium on completionist zeal that is the white hot ichor sustaining the life of the obsessive fan.And to that specific audience, this book must be an absolute favorite It explains every detail of the day to day journey of the band formation, practice, day jobs, song crafting, decision of track listings, touring, playing of songs on tour, differences between tour sets and album sets, major and minor spheres of influence in the national and international scene, etc, etc.I just wish this was a book about Public Enemy, or Sonic Youth Two of my personal favorites for whom this amount of minutia would translate into required reading As is, I struggled to reach the half way mark as the events and ticks begin to meld into one blurring wall of text not sound which I found myself less, and less, interested in navigating.Has great research with solid presentation and high quality printing and production, but ultimately destined for the bookshelves of true believers and historians


  3. Andrew Horton Andrew Horton says:

    Quite a boring treatment of the greatest rock band of all time, but since it s the only real book out there about the band it gets an auto pass Husker Du should be a section in the bookstore.


  4. Dav Dav says:

    This book has a lot of flaws, mostly in poor editing Extra star just because I enjoyed learningabout H sker D I m going to read Mould s own book next for a different bias.


  5. Mark Mark says:

    A fairly comprehensive, if extremely dry, biography of Husker Du I will only recommend this for fans of the band, anyone else will be bored stiff Then again, I don t know why anyone who is not a fan of Husker Du would read this book.I am a pretty big Husker Du fan, but it took be forever to get through this book Every time I cracked it open, I found myself fighting to keep my eyes open The prose style is just dull There is no better way to put it Still, if you re a Du fan, this is about A fairly comprehensive, if extremely dry, biography of Husker Du I will only recommend this for fans of the band, anyone else will be bored stiff Then again, I don t know why anyone who is not a fan of Husker Du would read this book.I am a pretty big Husker Du fan, but it took be forever to get through this book Every time I cracked it open, I found myself fighting to keep my eyes open The prose style is just dull There is no better way to put it Still, if you re a Du fan, this is about it as far as books about the band goes besides Bob Mould s autobiography and Michael Azerrad s chapter in This Band Could Be Your Life Though the narrative is a snooze, I give Earles credit for his extensive knowledge of the band, and for purposely not delving too deeply into Bob, Grant, and Greg s personal lives The focus is almost entirely on the music, and I appreciated that


  6. Jamie Jamie says:

    As a teenager listening to H sker D in the late 80s, finding any information beyond the what was contained in the band s eloquent lyrics, bar the few paragraphs included on the inner sleeve of Warehouse Songs And Stories, wad difficult The UK music press were always positive about the band, but I wanted to knowwho were they Who did the songs come from Where did their singular sound come from My treasured copy of the live video Makes No Sense aka Live From The Camden Palace wa As a teenager listening to H sker D in the late 80s, finding any information beyond the what was contained in the band s eloquent lyrics, bar the few paragraphs included on the inner sleeve of Warehouse Songs And Stories, wad difficult The UK music press were always positive about the band, but I wanted to knowwho were they Who did the songs come from Where did their singular sound come from My treasured copy of the live video Makes No Sense aka Live From The Camden Palace was no help, the total non song communication consisting of Thanks a lot, We ve got onefor ya, and We ll see ya Evenfrustratingly, articles written in the decades since see the HD database at referred to stories and legends about the band as though they were common knowledge, and while they might have been to fanzine readers in the USA, I was still left largely in the dark about what went into the making of this music So, I had high hopes for this book.Though Andrew Earles specifically states that he s not out to tell stories about the band members personal lives, his book left me feeling much closer to the creative processes, and the human beings, behind the band s incredible back catalogue, and to the history of the H skers.Earles has a readable style, and draws reminiscences from an impressive list of commentators, among them Steve Albini, Joe Carducci, Mike Watt, and of course Greg Norton and Grant Hart The book is fascinating when it comes to the band s early days, the twin cities music scene that they emerged from and the early US hardcore scene in general, but perhaps the author s greatest achievement is to claim H sker D s place amongst the pioneers of the DIY ethic that characterised the early hardcore scene Driving hundreds of miles from venue to venue and securing home town gigs for like minded bands, it seems that it s not only their music that makes the H skers heroes of the American underground What she has a refreshingly un awed view of said hardcore scene and of its flawed mainstay SST records, on which H sker D released so much of their music As I said in the title of this review though, for me the book isn t perfect Firstly, just a bitabout the band s personal lives and interactions with each other would have been justified, I think The songs they played were, after all, a product of their experiences, and I think it would have been possible to delve into those experiences without indulging in gossip although that may have made itdifficult to secure Grant and Greg s involvement Also towards the end of the band s career, details thin out a little although we still get some fascinating insights from Warner Bros insiders, and a view of the US music scene s response the move to a major label Conversely towards the start of the book there s a large section about H sker D s label Reflex Records with a lot of detail on its releases I think this section belongs in the book and that the detail is justified, but it might have worked better as an appendix As regards Earles preferences when it came to the band s music, these puzzled me at times particularly his dismissal of Bob Mould s post H sker masterpiece Workbook , but then music is subjective, and existing H sker fans will obviously already know their own minds on which songs they love, while any newcomer to the band enterprising enough to pick up this book as a guide can probably be trusted to make up her or his own mind.So while there might be a room for another book on the band alongside this and Bob Mould s autobiography and in all seriousness I d like it to be written by Greg Norton he was there and he s surely the least biased of the three , I think this will deservedly remain a prime resource on the band The impressive research and interviews that went into writing the book are not squandered, and for any H sker D fan, or indeed anyone with an interest in American underground music, I strongly recommend picking this up


  7. Tommy Carlson Tommy Carlson says:

    As a counter point to Bob s autobiography, I read this Bob less biography of Husker Du By Bob less I mean that Bob didn t contribute to it If you want the truth about Husker Du, it surely lies somewhere between this book and Bob s.That s if you can make it though this sprawling mess Honestly, did anyone edit this At all Whole sections are repeated Seriously There s a chunk about the Suicide Commandos, including a lengthy quote, that is simply repeated twice How could anyone miss that An As a counter point to Bob s autobiography, I read this Bob less biography of Husker Du By Bob less I mean that Bob didn t contribute to it If you want the truth about Husker Du, it surely lies somewhere between this book and Bob s.That s if you can make it though this sprawling mess Honestly, did anyone edit this At all Whole sections are repeated Seriously There s a chunk about the Suicide Commandos, including a lengthy quote, that is simply repeated twice How could anyone miss that And the storyline jumps about It s just sloppy.On the positive side, it s nice to hear the other side of some stories It makes Grant and Greg look less like the villains from Bob s book.The author is also, I think, pretty fair in his assessment of various Husker Du records He s not genuflecting towards everything they recorded He covers Twin Tone s rejection, while also admitting that what the Huskers were shopping around at the time wasn t that great He s even willing to point out that Zen Arcade has a lot of filler In the above auto bio, Bob also admits that Zen Arcade is muchmeaningful to fans than it is to him Personally, I didn t really start to love Husker Du until New Day Rising It s nice to know that I m not the only one who didn t absolutely love Zen Arcade.The author is also generous in his praise of Bob But there s also some snideness towards Bob s solo work More than once he talks about Bob finding his patented style But, the context in which it s mentioned always suggests, to my ears, an accusation of a lack of further musical development Maybe that s just me.Again, the Replacements are occasionally mentioned, usually in the same context as above The Mats just made great records while Husker Du was building a community.So, bottom line, this is a poorly organized book which still covers some important information and viewpoints I don t recommend it as a standalone read But it s a valuable counter point to Bob s one sided tome


  8. Jim Jim says:

    I ve been a huge fan of the Huskers Bob Mould for nearly 20 years sadly, I m too young to have seen them when they were around , but put off reading this one for a while despite the fact that it s obviously up my alley.My main reason for doing that, of course, was because of Mould s own book, published about eight months after this one Mould didn t participate in the making of this book because, well, he wrote his own Having read Mould s last year, it was time to finally read this one.As Ea I ve been a huge fan of the Huskers Bob Mould for nearly 20 years sadly, I m too young to have seen them when they were around , but put off reading this one for a while despite the fact that it s obviously up my alley.My main reason for doing that, of course, was because of Mould s own book, published about eight months after this one Mould didn t participate in the making of this book because, well, he wrote his own Having read Mould s last year, it was time to finally read this one.As Earles mentions in his introduction, this ultimately does serve as a compliment to Mould s, as it presents several viewpoints not present in his, mainly those of the other 2 3 of the band Certainly, a fan of the Huskers would enjoy seeing their take on things, and will ultimately enjoy the book.That said, as others have mentioned, there are serious editing repetition issues, andthan half the book is given over to the first two years of the band, leaving the author to rush to cover the other seven There s also a few glaring contradictions with regard to his opinions of the albums in the main body, he doesn t seem to like Candy Apple Grey much but praises it in the appendix vice versa for the second Warner Bros album, Warehouse Songs and Stories.There s also a certain amount of nitpicking I, as a fan, can do with his opinions of the albums, though generally I won t HOWEVER not listing Sugar s Copper Blue in the appendix s list of Top 10 Post Husker Du Albums is an unforgivable crime, as far as I m concerned, and I docked a star rating just for that He lists Sugar s Beaster and B Sides compilations instead, which is fine, but seriously, HE DOESN T LIST COPPER BLUE THIS IS WRONG In all, it s worth a read, but read Mould s book first


  9. Jeff Jeff says:

    First off, the title of the book I had was Husker Du The Story of the Noise Pop Pioneers Who Launched Modern Rock I thought the book was OK Parts of it were about record labels, other bands, and ancillary people in the Husker world and I found those parts to be a slog The parts focused strictly on Husker Du, especially the last few chapters, I found very interesting I especially liked the song by song breakdown analysis of their albums and first hand take from Hart and Norton about the fin First off, the title of the book I had was Husker Du The Story of the Noise Pop Pioneers Who Launched Modern Rock I thought the book was OK Parts of it were about record labels, other bands, and ancillary people in the Husker world and I found those parts to be a slog The parts focused strictly on Husker Du, especially the last few chapters, I found very interesting I especially liked the song by song breakdown analysis of their albums and first hand take from Hart and Norton about the final years of the band and eventual breakup We ll hear Bob s version when his book comes out this summer The discography and song lists in the appendix were a neat feature, and inspired me to fill in the few blanks I have in my Husker Du music collection


  10. Stenwjohnson Stenwjohnson says:

    The major flaws of Andrew Earles Husker Du The Story of the Noise Pop pioneers who launched modern rock are evident in the book s hyperventilating title Indie rock writing is often a strange mixture of elitism and adolescent overstatement, and Earles is no exception In his introduction, he lauds the late Twin Cities band s catalog as untouchable, while lamenting their tragic, unsung influence on an endless taxonomy of alt rock bands The band doesn t need such strong, self conscious che The major flaws of Andrew Earles Husker Du The Story of the Noise Pop pioneers who launched modern rock are evident in the book s hyperventilating title Indie rock writing is often a strange mixture of elitism and adolescent overstatement, and Earles is no exception In his introduction, he lauds the late Twin Cities band s catalog as untouchable, while lamenting their tragic, unsung influence on an endless taxonomy of alt rock bands The band doesn t need such strong, self conscious cheerleading their exceptional work speaks for itself, and the book is best when the participants are telling the story As a work of criticism, it s fresh off a high school newspaper press I ve abandoned reading this book at midpoint for now and am waiting for Bob Mould s memoir


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