Reading ➼ One Fat Englishman Author Kingsley Amis – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk

One Fat Englishman The Hero Of One Fat Englishman, A Literary Publisher And Lapsed Catholic Escaped From The Pages Of Graham Greene To The Campus Of Budweiser College In Provincial Pennsylvania, Is Philandering, Drunken, Bigoted, And Very Very Fat, Not To Mention In A State Of Continuous Spluttering Rage Against Everything, Not Least His Own Overgrown Self In America, Roger Micheldene Must Deal With Not So Obliging Suburban Housewives, Aspiring Jewish Novelists Who As Good As Clean His Clock, Stray Deer, Bad Cigars, Children Who Beat Him At Scrabble It Was No Wonder That People Were Horrible When They Started Life As Children , And America Itself, While Making Ever Desperate And Humiliating Overtures To Helen, A Scandinavian Ice Queen If Only Roger Would Dare To Show Some Real Feeling Of His Own This Comic Masterpiece About The 1950s Crashing Drunkenly Into The Consumerist 1960s And A Final Scion Of A Disintegrating Old World Empire Encountering Its Upstart New World Offspring Is One Of Kingsley Amis S Greatest And Most Caustic Performances.


10 thoughts on “One Fat Englishman

  1. says:

    Many are the artist s rendering of Roger Micheldene, one of the most despicable characters in all of literature By my eye, the above illustration captures the odious, lecherous louse in all his inglorious glory Dastardly, dreadful, disgraceful upon reading Kingsley Amis s novel, you will surely grow to love hating this bulbous Brit in his role as publisher on a business trip to America, visiting a land and people he simply can t stomach To highlight just how despicable, we are given glimpses of Roger s bigotry and racism he views a young Jewish novelist as a Yid scribbler with lobeless ears flapping, a young Asian lady as attractive if she only had eye sockets as well as eyes, a Black woman having skin as jet black as it can get And when it comes to Americans, Roger is at his scathing snobbish best On his car ride through suburbia he observes The distance of the houses from one another, their wooden construction, the absence of horticulture and fences or walls, the woodland setting, all combined to give the area the look of a semi temporary encampment for a battalion of parvenus And here s Roger s reflection on first meeting a fellow p...


  2. says:

    Kingsley Amis is the kind of writer who can give misogyny a bad name.Roger Micheldene, the One Fat Englishman of the title, is gluttonous, alcoholic and adulterous, but mostly just hateful and insufferably British I winced a lot.What I did like though was how One Fat Englishman got its title See, when he wrote this, Kingsley Amis was, or would become, all those things that Roger Micheldene was gluttonous, alcoholic, adulterous, hateful and insufferably British He famously cheated on his first wife, Hilary Anne Bardwell Martin s Mum Hilary, or Hilly, a...


  3. says:

    I m so glad people aren t writing books like this today They aren t, are they This is a truly unpleasant satire, hip deep in unfunny snark Roger Micheldene is a fat, lecherous, child hating, asshole Brit, a publisher on sojourn in the U.S Despite his fat lecherous assholery, women seem to be perfectly willing to sleep with him mysteriously, even attractive, happily married women , although no one really likes him, partly because he s British, partly because he s an asshole No one in this book is likeable, it must be said Here he is entering a shop, with whose proprietress he plans to share some afternoon delight A girl of Oriental appearance, who would have been quite acceptable if she had had eye sockets as well as eyes, came forward and said Good afternoon, sir, and what can I show you this afternoon Although relieved at not having to start on the wantee speakee missee drill he had been contemplating, Roger would have preferred something less impeccably American.And here he is at a jazz club, searching for his mistress A lanky Negro at the bar addresses him Man, y...


  4. says:

    Read this so long ago I remember nothing Hence no rating Actually it s even possible I never read it, but just carried it around for a few decades who knows I m discarding it It s rating here on GR doesn t make it very appealing.Neither does the cover art.


  5. says:

    Hilarious and fascinating a youngish, and still reputedly socialist Kingsley Amis predicts his future as an obese bigoted alcoholic womanizer with astonishing accuracy Kingsley rarely wastes his words, and his ability to put across comic situations is peerless well, except for his son Martin Here we get a darker, nastier version of his usual se...


  6. says:

    This book offers a quite remarkably negative self portrait The most obvious explanation is that Amis was disgusted with himself for leaving his first wife in such a callous manner, but few people would have gone this far There s an interesting question of chronology here, which I remember discussing with Jordan and Beth Ann Maybe someone who knows about Amis can tell us in precisely which order the following events happened Amis starts writing this novel Amis decides on the title On...


  7. says:

    Strung with the same gauge strings as Catcher in the Rye but played by a ham fisted drunk there s no reason anyone should like this but I m fairly confident almost everybody with an ear for humor will take delight Now and again I read something so visceral that I m ashamed to be holding a book instead of a bloody rag, drink or bundle of clothing Where Lucky Jim felt a bit constrained at times this work is an unrestrained whiskey soaked rager in comparison Amis writes well and he wastes nobody s time good for the bookish as well as the boozy If you enjoyed Monty Python s American Conversation Restaurant sketch you ll find yourself on familiar footing here Rarely a book so boozy is this smart and even rarely will you find yo...


  8. says:

    Roger Micheldene is, not to mince words, a truly horrible old man And not only a world class lecher, but also fat and morally ungainly One even begins to suspect that the author of One Fat Englishman, Sir Kingsley Amis, is somewhat like this himself Last month, I read his Girl, 20, which was also a revelation to me of hidden nastiness.During his writing career, Amis metamorphosed from a liberal to a conservative to a hidebound Tory and it is this latter which we see in his later novels No matter, his character Micheldene compensates by being funny as well as occasionally racist and otherwise biased At one point, he describes a girl of Oriental appearance, who would have been quite acceptable if she had had eye sockets as well as eyes One of the main plot points is our hero s distaste for the young Jewish American novelist Irving Macher, who steals Roger s notes for a college lectur...


  9. says:

    This is the first and so far only book by Kingsley Amis I have read, and judging by some of its other reviews, it isn t his best loved work I enjoyed it though, and so this encourages me to read other books by him I did not find it laugh out loud funny as some reviewers have, but it definitely had me smiling, sometimes broadly, on than one occasion As a satire of contemporary to publication British and American culture in the sauced up, swinging former half of the 1960 s, however, I did feel like I was missing some of the subtlety of the social commentary simply because it s now so removed in time.This book is a character sketch and psychological portrait as much as it is a satire, though, and I found it a compassionate, if unshrinking one But then I m probably also the president and sole member of the Real Life Women Who Like Roger Micheldene Fan Club You can read other reviews as to why he s a completely unredeemed and insufferable character they are lies Roger is an anti hero fat, bigoted, womanizing, prone to violent impulses repulsive by design to be sure but a comprehensibl...


  10. says:

    As well as being splutteringly, coffee spittingly funny, Kingsley Amis is always uncomfortable to read I used to think that this was because of the decidedly politically incorrect, right wing, Anglocentric and alas frequently racist attitudes which we know from history and biography he lent directly from his own to many of his fictional characters, grotesque as he may have made them As I ve come, however, with advancing age and disillusionment, to sympathise with many of his conservative positions though not the racism and misogyny , I still find him vaguely disconcerting, and I ve realised, at my first ever encounter with this comparatively early novel, that it has nothing to do with politics or social attitudes per se, but rather with the people who hold both them and the attitudes to which Amis opposes those of his protagonists and surrogates.In short, apparently mature, intellectual, responsible adults.Here, for example, the fat and drunken, and lecherous, and monstrously opinionated Englishman of the title, one ...


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