[PDF] ✓ Girl, 20 ✫ Kingsley Amis – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk

Girl, 20 Kingsley Amis, Along With Being The Funniest English Writer Of His Generation Was A Great Chronicler Of The Fads And Absurdities Of His Age, And Girl, 20 Is A Delightfully Incisive Dissection Of The Flower Power Phase Of The 1960s Amis S Antihero, Sir Roy Vandervane, A Conductor And Composer Who Bears Than A Passing Resemblance To Leonard Bernstein, Is A Pillar Of The Establishment Whohas Fallen Hard For Protest, Bellbottoms, And The Electric Guitar And Since Vain Sir Vandervane Is A Great Success, He Is Also Free To Pursue His Greatest Failing A Taste For Younger And Younger Women Highborn Hippie Sylvia Not, In Fact, Twenty Is His Latest Infatuation And A Threat To His Whole Family, From His Drama Queen Wife, Kitty, To Penny, His Long Suffering Daughter.All This Is Recounted By Douglas Yandell, A Music Critic With His Own Love Problems, Who Finds That He Too Has A Part In This Story Of Botched Artistry, Bumbling Celebrity, And Scheming Family, In A Time That For All Its High Minded Talk Is As Low And Dishonest As Any Other.


10 thoughts on “Girl, 20

  1. says:

    Flower power packs a powerful topsy turvy punch on nearly everybody in the late 1960s, even a renowned 54 year old symphony orchestra conductor in London This is one Kingsley Amis novel I found to be highly engaging, entertaining and, such a pleasant surprise, actually funny and for a clear cut reason the novel is first person, the narrator, Douglas Yandell, a wishy washy 34 year old aesthetically attuned classical musician and music critic continually speaks words and makes observations scathing, ironic, biting and occasionally heartfelt And this in a time when the influence of 60s style hippie culture was at its peak, when youth and newness were valued for their own sake, buttoned down Douglas has much cultural material to be scornful and cutting about.By way of example, Douglas listens to his friend, conductor violinist Sir Roy Vandervane many readers, including myself, can t help picturing Leonard Bernstein prattle in front of Sylvia, his new 20 year hippie lover I suppose the real division comes between those who...


  2. says:

    There is the English Language, and then there is the English Language as played with by Kingsley Amis, never on fuller display than here There was the usual British slang knackered, buggering, sodding. But some of it was new to me There was the Frenchman who couldn t read Girl, 20 in a small ad column without getting the horn or men who suddenly started flashing their hamptons There are a social diluent, an odium sharer, and a degenerate descendant of Charles II There s also a psephologist a man who knows about elections, we are told , but that s just another kind of showing off.I can not begin to tell you for how many years I did not know that arse creep was a verb.Sunglasses are blinkers I didn t know that either Nor did I know that when you see a pedestrian wearing blinkers on an overcast day, stopped at a crosswalk, you should grab him by the arm and steward him across the street What could go wrong As you can see from some of the above, there is a bit of discussion about sexual tangents And a prick is a splendid thing, and a splendid idea as well It strikes you The trouble is that in every case it s got a man on the end of it Which I m afraid puts paid to it as far as I m concerned Then there s flagellation I never even seriously considered that It strikes you, sure, but what s it got to do ...


  3. says:

    As you get older, you ll find that absolutely straight down the middle sex doesn t strike you in quite the way it did Sir Roy s pursuit of something stimulating wreaks havoc in his own and everyone else s life in this comic observation of the late 1960s Written by Tony Bilbow based on Kingsley Amis s novel Girl 20.Starring Robert Stephens as Sir Roy Vandervane, Christopher Timothy as Douglas Yandell, Eva Stuart as Lady Kitty, ...


  4. says:

    One of the great moral novels of our parents time Amis proves himself here a successor to Jane Austen and Sophocles in his dramatization of the moral rules that are older than the gods and how they play out in contemporary, historically rooted life Nothing so dated as the Goodreads reviews here that criticize the dat...


  5. says:

    3.5 stars rounded upI have only read one book by Kingsley Amis before, the well known Lucky Jim This book is similar in style, a comedy set in London of the late 60 s In part a social commentary on the youth of the 60 s, we follow 2 main characters the narrator, a music critic in his mid 30 s who detests anything modern, especially music but not the sexual revolution which allows him to have an active sex life in his London bachelor pad , and his friend, a well known orchestra conductor and musician who is going through a mid life crisis and has run off with a teenager It is funny, although sensitive readers will likely be put off by its casual racism and misogyny More than just a comedy though, as the events of the book do turn the narrator s life upside down, causing him to question his whole outlook but without any neat resolution at the end Certainly part of Amis talent is to create well drawn and memorable characters, and although his books probably haven t aged well, I will s...


  6. says:

    Probably best placed in the category alongside excavated neolithic flint tools useful only for its historic insights but about as anachronistic as kipper ties, muttonchop whiskers, and getting turned over in police cells We should thank our lucky stars that the attitudes h...


  7. says:

    This books invites accusations that it is dated The barbs at hippies the 70s right thinking left, etc., are certainly era specific And there is some casual racism and misogyny that rings off key today But while the details may have changed, the types remain accurate Where the trend followers in the early 70s may have been motivated by apartheid, anti establishment fomenters, pop music, youth culture, etc., today s analogues are energized by Gaza, life style businesses, pop music and youth culture The critique remains valid even if the decorations have changed.But this is than an attack on easy targets It is the story of two men, one, yes, a trend chasing composer conductor in thrall with youth movements But the second is an aesthete critic, unwilling to champion any ideals except art This comedy is black both men are left exposed as somewhat empty, unable to defend their biases It s a heart breaking look at what is all too real for many of...


  8. says:

    Lucky Jim was far knock you out enthralling, but Girl, 20 is far nuanced I stumbled over the first two chapters, though Every once in a while you pick up a book and the first few pages seem unintelligible for no good reason.As comic as this book is, there are many sobering moments that are frighteningly insightful What seems like a romp ultimate turns out to a be a pretty profound novel about age and responsibility, free will and the affects of o...


  9. says:

    Thirty three year old Londoner Douglas Yandell, pianist, music critic, and crank, is clever, though some of his word play is hard for an American reader in 21st century to comprehend quickly enough for his jokes to work, and some of his jokes seem context specific I couldn t figure out a running gag, as to why a man having an affair, which seems to involve normal coitus, would forever need to stock up on extra underwear I ll assume that this is because the joke aged poorly and not because of prudishness or denseness on my part Douglas also tells us, early on, that his curiosity is a problem for him because it leads him to get embroiled in other people s problems, particularly those of his rakish mentor, Sir Roy Vandervane Douglas loves and disapproves of Roy, and he s troubled by Roy s facile hippie rants, Roy s hedonistic pursuit of an obnoxious teenager, and Roy s squandering of his gifts, musical and personal Roy is a twice married father of three, states that do not seem to affect him very much at all But for all Douglas s staunch defense of normalcy, his self seems poorly defined His problem isn t so much curiosity or crankiness as it is a failure to be earnest about anything There is a character, Mr Copes, who appears only briefly near the end, apparently to be the novel...


  10. says:

    Amis vs the permissive society For starters it was funny there are some really good jokes, some good bad ones and some brilliant one liners but for a comic novel this is genuinely spiky, bitter, bleak that ending and full of moral and intellectual disgust sweet deal Reading this all these decades later it does read like a kind of last stand for a certain ideology, Mr Amis in his indictment of 60 s youth culture, might come across as outdated and like a filthy snob, I m gues...