[KINDLE] ❤ Goddess: Mythological Images of the Feminine ➜ Christine Downing – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk

Goddess: Mythological Images of the Feminine Praise For The Goddess Exciting And Important Library Journal Remarkable Psychological Perspective Direct And Intimate The Journal Of Analytic Psychology


About the Author: Christine Downing

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Goddess: Mythological Images of the Feminine book, this is one of the most wanted Christine Downing author readers around the world.



10 thoughts on “Goddess: Mythological Images of the Feminine

  1. says:

    Keep in mind this book was originally published in 1981 Even so, those with sensitivity to a certain outsider perspective which could of course seem assumptive and dismissive of survivor experience to rape may understandably wish to steer clear The interpretation of mythic rape and sexuality in this book are discordant, perhaps even in war with, our contemporary understanding These aspects are also fused with Freudian interpretation of personal dreams and Jungian depth psychology This per Keep in mind this book was originally published in 1981 Even so, those with sensitivity to a certain outsider perspective which could of course seem assumptive and dismissive of survivor experience to rape may understandably wish to steer clear The interpretation of mythic rape and sexuality in this book are discordant, perhaps even in war with, our contemporary understanding These aspects are also fused with Freudian interpretation of personal dreams and Jungian depth psychology This perspective is integral to the book, but lays subjective perspective on the table in plain sight I can see and feel in her judgment of Artemis that she is Aphrodite After all, I am Artemis.The rest, and grand majority, of this text is a lively and fascinating feminist rediscovery of the archetypal Greek goddesses based on overlooked textual evidence The first chapter, To Start Us Imagining, contains the most illuminating words I ve read about women s diminished or all but entirely erased role in contemporary religion and divinity in years Overall, the work is empowering, thought provoking, and inspiring, if only a little antiquated.This kind of work begs to be revisited in contemporary gender, queer, and sexuality studies Perhaps it could inspire here, too


  2. says:

    I read this book after The Goddesses in Everywoman by Jean Shinoda Bolen, and I was impressed by this book as much and in some ways even .The two books are very similar since they re both dealing with exploration of the Feminine Divine archetypes from Jungian point of view, but Christine Downing does it in a poetic, honest, autobiographical way from which my understanding of the topic benefited.


  3. says:

    I found this after having read Bolen s Goddesses in Everywoman, and was surprised by how radically different Downing s style was Whereas Bolen analyzed the archetypes of all the major Greek goddesses of the first and second generations children and grandchildren of Cronus , Downing limited herself to Persephone, Hera, Athene, Artemis and Aphrodite, while also including the Greek heroine Ariadne and Gaia, a primordial deity In addition, where Bolen utilized a consistent structure for each ch I found this after having read Bolen s Goddesses in Everywoman, and was surprised by how radically different Downing s style was Whereas Bolen analyzed the archetypes of all the major Greek goddesses of the first and second generations children and grandchildren of Cronus , Downing limited herself to Persephone, Hera, Athene, Artemis and Aphrodite, while also including the Greek heroine Ariadne and Gaia, a primordial deity In addition, where Bolen utilized a consistent structure for each chapter, discussing the mythology, archetypes, psychological difficulties etc, for each goddess, Downing discussed her selected goddesses invaried ways Importantly, Downing also spent a great deal of time detailing her personal experiences and feelings related to each goddess archetype, including extensive passages on dreams she thought were relevant.I would not recommend this as an introduction to Greek goddesses as archetypes in Jungian psychology However, if you already familiar with the archetypes, there are particular chapters that can enrich your understandingFor example, I found Downing s discussion of the Hera archetype extremely helpful in learningabout the goddess three fold nature and underlying motivations That being said, much of the book is fairly tiresome and she often goes on tangents that are only nominally related to the the goddesses in question If you have the patience to plow through those sections, she occasionally offers some insightful analysis, but it may only be worth it if you are still looking for somethingafter having already exhausted all other existing literature on the subject


  4. says:

    Un muy peculiar libro que combina la mitograf a, con la confesi n personal y la psicolog a La diosa no deja de tener cosas interesantes, auqnue me quede muy fr a ante las confesiones de la autora, que no s c mo catalogar, que me interesan bien poco.


  5. says:

    I think this book will benefit from a second reading, because this first time around, it felt very much like a mixed bag to me Even though Downing starts off with an explanation of what she wants to set out to do in the book, it still seemed unclear to me exactly what she was talking about For the majority of the book, i felt confused I found myself thinking numerous times that, in order to fully understand what Downing was talking about, one would have to be acquainted with Freud Jung, alo I think this book will benefit from a second reading, because this first time around, it felt very much like a mixed bag to me Even though Downing starts off with an explanation of what she wants to set out to do in the book, it still seemed unclear to me exactly what she was talking about For the majority of the book, i felt confused I found myself thinking numerous times that, in order to fully understand what Downing was talking about, one would have to be acquainted with Freud Jung, along with the other writers she mentions quotes throughout the text A few parts, like the chapter on Athene i would have liked some explanation as to why Downing spelled it so, as opposed to Athen a the chapter on Gaia, feltunderstandable to me for some reason The others, like the chapter on Artemis, felt like a disconnected jumble with academic references quotations that went over my head It sometimes felt like Downing s language became confused bogged down at points, as well.However, i definitely want to reread it, because i feel as if on a second reading, i may begin to understand things better, or to maybe spendtime with them I don t feel that it s a bad book, but i did often find myself wishing for some clarification that used less jargon which is not the same as wishing it to be dumbed down The title is misleading, i think I picked it up because i was under the mistaken assumption that the book would be about looking at actual images depictions, artworks of the Goddesses discussed therein, going from there Downing rarely discusses visual images depictions of the Goddesses in fact, there is only ever one image per chapter, right at the very beginning of it I supposed Downing is discussing images in the sense of how the Goddesses are have been perceived throughout time nevertheless, it feels like the wrong word choice I don t have a better suggestion, admittedly, but images doesn t feel correct after reading the book Overall, it is a read that probably shouldn t be taken lightly, also not discarded in irritation, even if you come close to wanting to do so It s probably helpful if you have some background knowledge in psychology, since Downing seems to constantly reference it, probably other academics that i can t identify She does, of course, weave in her own personal stories, which at best work to reenforce theacademic bits of the writing At the worst, they feel disjointed confusing, leaving me to wonder what the connection between certain things was, why they were included I kept reading because i wanted to understand what was being discussed, because at times i felt the book was able to convey something wonderfully, i want to try reading it again, to see if i m able to understand , especially in those chapters where i felt the most confused


  6. says:

    Although I value the goddesses and other ancient creatures and believe they have some kind of meaning even at this distance, I found Downing s interpretation self indulgent and so introspective as to be quite nearly uncomfortable Her monolog to Aphrodite was especially boring, and I am not sure her reflections on the child image bear any resemblance to even the most personal reality.


  7. says:

    Lots to ponder here Similar, in some ways, to Bolen s Goddesses in Everywoman, butautobiographical in nature.


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