Marvelous Things Overheard: Poems ePUB × Marvelous


Marvelous Things Overheard: Poems [PDF / Epub] ☁ Marvelous Things Overheard: Poems By Ange Mlinko – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk A vibrant and eclectic collection from a stunningly mature young poet The world the time has come to say it, though the news will not be welcome to everyone has no intention of abandoning enchantment A vibrant and eclectic collection from a stunningly mature young poet The world the time has come to say it, though the news will not be welcome to everyone has no intention of abandoning enchantment altogether Roberto Calasso s words in Literature and the Gods remind us that, in an age of reason, of mechanization, of alienation, of rote drudgery, Marvelous Things Kindle - we still seek out the transcendent, the marvelous Ange Mlinko s luminous fourth collection is both a journey toward and the space of that very enchantment Marvelous Things Overheard takes its title from a collection of ancient rumors about the lands of the Mediterranean Mlinko, who lived at the American University of Beirut and traveled to Greece and Cyprus, has penned poems that seesaw between the life lived in those ancient and strife torn places, and the life imagined through its literature from The Greek Anthology to the Mu allaqat Throughout, Mlinko grapples with the passage of time on two levels her own aging alongside the growing up of her children and the incontrovertible evidence of millennia of human habitationThis is an assured and revealing collection, one that readers will want to seek refuge in again and again.


10 thoughts on “Marvelous Things Overheard: Poems

  1. Steven Critelli Steven Critelli says:

    The ancient work, Marvelous Things Heard, though historically attributed to Aristotle, is generally considered an apocryphal text of remade myths and tall tales which were doubtlessly intended for readers steeped in a tradition of storytelling that straddled anecdote, superstition and religious belief and served to fascinate, inspire and teach More importantly, the text tested the continued durability of the fabulous and the fantastic against the background of analytical Greek thought that was The ancient work, Marvelous Things Heard, though historically attributed to Aristotle, is generally considered an apocryphal text of remade myths and tall tales which were doubtlessly intended for readers steeped in a tradition of storytelling that straddled anecdote, superstition and religious belief and served to fascinate, inspire and teach More importantly, the text tested the continued durability of the fabulous and the fantastic against the background of analytical Greek thought that was seeing its sun rise over Western civilization In this cultural womb the grand narratives of human progress and freedom were born Yet, in the wake of post modernism, Jean Fran ois Lyotard posited that the age of grand narratives was over, for these stories could no longer speak universally given our essentially diverse orientations, perspectives, desires and needs Instead, Lyotard believed we had entered the age of micronarratives and that those stories would now sustain us In this vein, Ange Mlinko s new book of poetry, Marvelous Things Overheard, reinterprets our modern experience by way of micronarratives using poetry s familiar lens of myth, fable, and anecdote, overlaying the received truth of the electronic media, local gossip and family history The psychological perspective, one that Mlinko surely sees as uniting us with ancients, discloses an unsettling arrhythmia at the heart of our existence in the modern world Where the people of the ancient world invented myth and religion to comfort and reassure themselves of a measure of understanding, especially where injustice and cruelty were regular features of life in the uncivilized world, and thereby sought relief from life s uncertainties through ritual and worship, when the unknown and unexpected rear up in a modern world of science and information glut, it is a cause for unease and doubt in our collective ability to assert with any confidence that good will prevail and that our future will be better than the past The first poem in this volume, The Grind, which was published in Poetry in September 2012 is a microcosm encapsulating this overriding thematic concept.Three mini ciabattini for breakfastwhere demand for persnickety breadis small, hence its expense, hence my steadfastrecalculation of my overhead,which soars, and as you might expectthe ciabattini stand in for my fantasyof myself in a sea limned prospect,on a terrace, with a lemon treeNot Assessed a fee for rent sent a day late.Not Fines accrued for a lost library book.Better never lose track of the date.Oversleep, and you re on the hook The myth of our divine origins succumbs to the devil in the details that overwhelm us The demands of modern life waste the soul and deprive the individual of a nurturing environment It s life ground down to recurrence It s fewer books read for the thinking Rebilled hospital bills, missing homework, and dog grooming expenses that displace one s own personal care, these are the hair shirts of our daily existence Sooner or later the phalanx of family and cultural values begins to crumble and other,ominous forces begin to build within, a Grimm fairytale, where they create a replacement mythos for the good old fashioned potatoes and plain living we were reared on and thought sufficient.When I turn my hand mill, I think of the dowagerwho ground gems on ham for her guests the queen who ground out two cups of flouron the pregnant abdomen of her husband s mistress I think of a great rock eating bird grinding out a sandy beach,the foam said to be particulate matterof minute crustaceans, eachbrilliantly spooning up Aphroditeto Greek porticoes, and our potatoes,and plain living which might beshaken by infinitesimal tattoos.Full review at


  2. A A says:

    Delightful poetry Excellent and intriguing use of allusion and repetition Accessible but not trite.


  3. Lou Last Lou Last says:

    NAIAD MATHYou should see us try to fix numbers on our slates.Not the cuneiform weapons of swordfish could aid uswhen rounding off near an estuary.Doing arithmetic, we turn color like the octopus.Geometry is just as difficult adding aquaeous anglesduring rough winds made one of the Limnades weep We weep anyway, by our hems and hair ends But counting spirals and stripes on shelly things delights us noticing series voiced by cicadas, likewise.There s solace in the horizon the nothingness abovedi NAIAD MATHYou should see us try to fix numbers on our slates.Not the cuneiform weapons of swordfish could aid uswhen rounding off near an estuary.Doing arithmetic, we turn color like the octopus.Geometry is just as difficult adding aquaeous anglesduring rough winds made one of the Limnades weep We weep anyway, by our hems and hair ends But counting spirals and stripes on shelly things delights us noticing series voiced by cicadas, likewise.There s solace in the horizon the nothingness abovedivided by this teemingness belowmakes room, by which we come to figure The continuum assumption states that weare none of us discrete, but move in kindthrough your cerebrum, without whichthere would be no medium for thinking.And yet they flow through you sparkling,these mental waters, only at our discretion.A three dimensional vortex begins to rotateand comes the wave cascading on itselfflexing like the flank of the oryx as it runs flushing the pipes and mouths the yearshave fashioned from habitual assumptionlike glimmering variables through an algorithm from WINGANDECOIAWhoso list to hunt it with a camera The Carolina parrot is extinct.Hunted to nothing emerald.We ll never see its plumage,which lives only in the imageof psittacines caught on cameraand in Audubon prints but what I d give to hear the speech of this princeof hunted to nothing emerald.Did it lure the colonists inland With what speech or song Gone that song.A painter on the ship, not camera White bade his shallop men sing chauntiesin the dark, but no one emergedfrom the forests of maritime emerald.The birds must have lured them inland intelligent Carolina parakeet.Whoso list to hunt it with a camera,hunted to nothing emerald.Governance from a distance, like a star Sir Water Raleigh per his accent whose mistress gasped swisser swatter swisser swatter massaged against a tree.He sent his people to the pot pot cheeand governed from a distance, like a star.But the psittacines are silent when whoso list to hunt a silver cup is gone.Up against a wall, swisser swatter,Native Aquascogoc is set on fire.A silver Communion cup Gone the communion thanks to governance from a star.But stars may fall, nay they must fallwhen they trouble the sphere wherein they abide.Down upon a block, swisser swatter,they chopped his head Gone that language,in truth all of its pomp and plumage governance from a distance, like a star,and down against the block, swisser swatter


  4. Leonard Leonard says:

    I loved the title of this collection but found the poems awkward and inaccessible Maybe it requiresthan one reading.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *