Thank You for Your Service PDF/EPUB Í You for Your

Thank You for Your Service [KINDLE] ✽ Thank You for Your Service ❁ David Finkel – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk From a MacArthur Fellow and the author ofThe Good Soldiers, a profound look at life after warThe wars of the past decade have been covered by brave and talented reporters, but none has reckoned with t for Your eBook ✓ From a MacArthur Fellow and the author ofThe Good Soldiers, a profound look at life after warThe wars of the past decade have been covered by brave and talented reporters, but none has reckoned with the psychology of these wars as intimately as Thank You PDF \ the Pulitzer Prize winning journalist David Finkel For The Good Soldiers, his bestselling account from the front lines of Baghdad, Finkel embedded with the men of the Infantry Battalion during the infamous surge, a grueling fifteen month tour that changed them all forever In You for Your PDF/EPUB ¼ Finkel s hands, readers can feel what these young men were experiencing, and his harrowing story instantly became a classic in the literature of modern war In Thank You for Your Service, Finkel has done something even extraordinary Once again, he has embedded with some of the men of the but this time he has done it at home, here in the States, after their deployments have ended He is with them in their most intimate, painful, and hopeful moments as they try to recover, and in doing so, he creates an indelible, essential portrait of what life after war is like not just for these soldiers, but for their wives, widows, children, and friends, and for the professionals who are truly trying, and to a great degree failing, to undo the damage that has been done The story Finkel tells is mesmerizing, impossible to put down With his unparalleled ability to report a story, he climbs into the hearts and minds of those he writes about Thank You for Your Service is an act of understanding, and it offers a complete picture than we have ever had of these two essential questions When we ask young men and women to go to war, what are we asking of them And when they return, what are we thanking them for One of Publishers Weekly s Best Nonfiction books ofOne of The Washington Post s Topbooks of the Year A New York Times Notable Book of An NPR Best Book of A Kirkus Reviews Best Nonfiction Book of.


About the Author: David Finkel

for Your eBook ✓ David Finkel is a staff writer for The Washington Post, and is also the leader of the Post s national reporting team He won the Pulitzer Prize for explanatory reporting in for a series of stories about US funded democracy efforts in Thank You PDF \ Yemen Finkel lives in Silver Spring, Maryland, with his wife and two daughters Email him at davidfinkel thegoodsoldierstp uscmillan author davidf.



10 thoughts on “Thank You for Your Service

  1. Darlene Darlene says:

    You could see it in his nervous eyes You could see it in his shaking hands You could see it in the three prescription bottles in his room one to steady his galloping heart rate, one to reduce his anxiety, one to minimize his nightmares You could see it in the screensaver on his laptop a nuclear fireball and the words FUCK IRAQ and in the private journal he had been keeping I ve lost all hope I feel the end is near for me, very, very near Dark ness is all I see any Davi You could see it in his nervous eyes You could see it in his shaking hands You could see it in the three prescription bottles in his room one to steady his galloping heart rate, one to reduce his anxiety, one to minimize his nightmares You could see it in the screensaver on his laptop a nuclear fireball and the words FUCK IRAQ and in the private journal he had been keeping I ve lost all hope I feel the end is near for me, very, very near Dark ness is all I see any David Finkel Thank You for Your Service For 15 months in 2007 08, Washington Post journalist David Finkel was embedded with the men of the Army s Second Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment the 2 16 , during their deployment to Iraq He wrote about this deployment in his book, The Good Soldiers In this book, Thank You for Your Service , which was published in 2013, Mr Finkel revisited a number of the men of the 2 16, and through interviews, military records and his access to service members emails, letters, and personal journals, he presents a glimpse into the lives of these veterans and their families as they struggle to resume their lives in what Mr.Finkel refers to as the after war period David Finkel provides background on a number of the veterans of the 2 16 in this book and each of the chapters allows a peak into each life experiences in Iraq, his current health both physical and psychological, emotional challenges and the perspectives of spouses, girlfriends and family members An emphasis IS placed on one particular veteran, however.Sgt Adam Schumann, who is the subject of the quote with which I began this review Mr Finkel catches up with Adam Schumann age 28 two years after Schumann had walked into an aid station marked COMBAT STRESS and asked for help During his deployment, Adam had been experiencing symptoms of combat stress although no one had known he had been suffering Adam received a mental health evacuation out of Iraq and ultimately back to a life he was finding every bit as difficult in Junction City, Kansas Two years after Adam s return to his wife Saskia and their two young children, his life appears as unsettled and chaotic as it was the day he boarded the first flight in his long trip home David Finkel describes Adam as appearing physically healthy out of the army and has gained back some weight.When he left the war as the great Sgt Schumann, he was verging on gaunt Twenty five pounds later he is once again solid But Adam is still carrying invisible scars He suffers from depression, migraine headaches, violent outbursts, mild traumatic brain injury from a mortar round which fell without warning and left him unconscious for a short period of time, PTSD and there is the recurring nightmare that he can t seem to shake of carrying his fellow soldier, Michael Emory, across his back Having been shot in the head, Emory s blood continuously flowed from his wound into Adam s mouth Adam is haunted by this scene in his nightmares and can t seem to rid himself of the taste of Michael s blood in his mouth Adam Schumann and his wife Saskia made frequent trips to the Veterans Administration Hospital in Topeka, Kansas, a 60 mile trip, so that Adam could see doctors and counselors, and of course, to pick up his many prescriptions As Adam made the rounds of the various professionals at the hospital, Saskia waited and often wondered if the appointments, the drugs and the therapy are doing any good She thinks about Adam s depression, his occasional violent behavior and the way his personality had changed He wasn t the same man he had been before his deployments She tries to remain hopeful about their future but it s clear she is struggling with maintaining her patience with Adam through his violent outbursts and his desire for isolation She also struggles with her own feelings of depression and the stress of caring for their two children and their constant lack of money I couldn t help but feel that Saskia could have benefited from some of the same resources that were made available to Adam There WERE times that Saskia was invited to sit in during Adam s therapy sessions and it was obvious that the counselors were aware and concerned about how Adam s struggles affected the entire family But Saskia made a point of always saying He s still a good guy He s just a broken good guy I was struck time and again while reading this book that Adam Schumann s marriage and his family. along with the other veterans who were profiled were in extreme crisis most of the time Many seemed to be struggling not only with physical and psychological challenges but also extreme financial pressures And although the doctors and counselors at the Veterans Hospital cared about their patients, their ability to address the challenges being faced often seemed ineffective or temporary As much as one person s story can be considered typical , Adam Schumann s personal experiences appear hauntingly similar to all the other veterans stories that are related in this book The lives of these men and their families are characterized by a constant sense of chaos and crisis anxiety, excessive alcohol consumption, sleeplessness, nightmares in which they are haunted by war experiences, quick and unexpected violent behavior and constant suicidal thoughts or multiple suicide attempts In one shocking and painful scene portrayed in the book, Adam sits in his basement It s a room of dimness and shadows The bare lightbulb hanging from the ceiling unlit, and what little light is leaking into the room feels gray and dirty Adam is in the middle of the room, seated on a folding chair He is faced away from her Saskia and holding the shotgun against the underside of his chin His thumb is on the trigger The safety is off So this is where he will die, then Not in a Humvee not in the war, but here in the furnace room, next to the room his daughter wants him to paint, under the room where his son is asleep , and a few inches from his terrified wife She asks him to put the gun down He doesn t He moves the barrel of the gun from his chin to his forehead His thumb is still on the trigger He moves the barrel back under neath his chin and starts crying so hard that the barrel becomes wet He says something now , about being a bad husband, a bad father, a disappointment about being twenty nine and feeling ninety about being a disgrace His mind is roaring , and meanwhile his thumb is still on the trigger, the safety is off, the gun remains loaded and Saskia stands next to him, begging and waiting for the sound of the gun and for him to explode And what saves him is another sound, that of Jaxson his son His crying comes through the floorboards, sudden and insistent This traumatic scene plays out many times in the lives described in this book and they never stop being disturbing and difficult to read These men are seeking help. showing up for appointments with endless numbers of doctors and counselors They are carrying around grocery sacks filled with assorted pharmaceuticals and struggling to live some semblance of a normal life but the stress and hardships these families experience bleeds through on every page.David Finkel is not particularly critical of the Veterans Administration and perhaps rightly so It s apparent that the individuals which make up this bureaucracy are trying their best to provide care for these veterans, despite appearing overburdened and perhaps underfunded and understaffed There are also private charitable organizations which are attempting to aid veterans one of which is located in California and operated by a veteran and former social worker named Fred Gusman Fred founded Pathway Home, which became the first residential treatment program for veterans Adam Schumann spent some time at Pathway Home and the time se spent there DID seem to leave him feeling calmer andhopeful about his future one of the true bright spots in the book But what does this book accomplish At first glance, David Finkel, in his honest and raw reporting on Adam Schumann and other members of the 2 16, he seems to be attempting to educate and inform the public But the title of this book Thank You for Your Service led me to thinkdeeply about not only about the lives of these men and their families but also about the society and culture we are a part of This book encouraged me to dig a little deeper According to information from the Council on Foreign Relations, the United States military, which became an all volunteer force after the draft wa ended in 1973, is now comprised of men and women who make up less than 1% of the general population of the United States 0.5% And according to a report from the Department of Defense, 20 veterans committed suicide EVERY DAY in 2018 When thinking about the statistics I found, I was struck by the fact that although the United States has been at war for nearly 2 decades Afghanistan and Iraq and also conflicts in Syria, Libya, Yemen, Somalia among others , the men and women involved in these never ending wars make up less than 1% of the general population The stress and hardships being placed on this small group of people and their families is enormous and is shockingly illustrated on every page of David Finkel s book Meanwhile, the remaining 99% of society seems to remain blissfully ignorant of the struggles and pain faced by returning veterans I don t pretend to know what these veterans need and it seems that even the Veterans Administration and the Defense Department are struggling to answer this question But to me, this book, Thank You for Your Service asks that, as a society, we get engaged in educating ourselves about the experiences and needs of veterans and perhaps instead of offering the shamelessly inadequate platitude thank you for your service , we can actually find out what is needed Maybe we can begin by demanding that our elected officials end what seems as an often casual and thoughtless commitment to endless war.It seems to me that we all need to be reminded that war and conflict should be entered into only as a last resort and after a great deal of careful and thoughtful consideration


  2. Nancy Oakes Nancy Oakes says:

    finish date 12 27 2013If you ve decided after reading about this book that it s too bleak, well, consider what the people in this book and others whose stories didn t make it into this book are going through Or their wives, who married a guy, said goodbye to him as he deployed, and found that the man who came back home was someone entirely different Rarely in life does a book come along that has me telling everyone I know that they have to read it I just finished Thank You For Your Service, finish date 12 27 2013If you ve decided after reading about this book that it s too bleak, well, consider what the people in this book and others whose stories didn t make it into this book are going through Or their wives, who married a guy, said goodbye to him as he deployed, and found that the man who came back home was someone entirely different Rarely in life does a book come along that has me telling everyone I know that they have to read it I just finished Thank You For Your Service, and if you have friends or family returning from military deployment, you may find this book to be an invaluable resource Yes, there are a number of books on PTSD out there on the market already, but trust me you will have never read anything like this one.Mr Finkel s prior book The Good Soldiers, had him embedded with men in an army battalion in Baghdad during the 2007 surge Thank You For Your Service finds him embedded yet again, but this time here in the US, after the soldiers deployments are finished As the dustjacket blurb states, He is with them in their most intimate, painful, and hopeful moments in a period he calls the after war, as these men begin the process of trying to recover The book focuses on soldiers returning with the invisible wounds of this war, including traumatic brain injury, post traumatic stress, depression and anxiety, causing emotional, mental and physical scars, often finding their outlet in spousal abuse, alcoholism, drug abuse and sometimes suicide But it s not just the men the author also offers the viewpoints and voices of wives or girlfriends who try to adjust to their men being home but broken In most cases, the women are simply not equipped to handle the changes and they often wonder what happened to the men they said goodbye to at the start of their deployment.The Army does offer some help for their men, but it comes largely in the form of medications often a high powered combination of meds to control anxiety, depression, and sleeplessness There is also the possibility of entering Warrior Transition Battalions WTB , but just getting in is a bureaucratic nightmare One man had to collect over 30 signatures in a given amount of time, only to find that some of the offices he had to visit were closed or manned by inadequately prepared staff And although these soldiers have to sign a Contract for Safety, including a promise that if they are feeling suicidal they ll let someone know, the suicide rate continues to climb In Washington, at least one man, General Peter Chiarelli, took the suicide rate very seriously, demanding accountability for each and every self inflicted death at regular meetings However, his efforts were often at the mercy of senators and other high ranking officials, whom he had to wine and dine and who sometimes had other things that werepressing In trying to put together lessons learned from the cases, details revealed that it was difficult to learn much at all Attempts to find patterns in the suicides remained elusive, and trying to get at a cause for both suicide and PTSD was nearly impossible could the cause have something to do with the military now being an all volunteer force, and a disproportionate percentage of those volunteering coming from backgrounds that made them predisposed to trauma orimportantly, Could it have nothing to do with the soldier and everything to do with the type of war now being fought Have we asked too much of these men There are other treatment options but for men like Adam Schumann, the veteran whose story is central to most of this book, it would mean, as his wife notes, seven weeks of no work and no pay That s two missed house payments Car payments, too Electricity Gas Phone Groceries The rehab treatment place where Schumann eventually received help was saved from closing at the last minute by an anonymous donor.The soldiers and their families who agreed to participate in Finkel s work did so knowing that everything would be public and on the record, and this openness is what makes this book so haunting Sometimes I had to put the book down, regroup emotionally, and then come back to it and when a book can do this, the author has done an excellent job Most highly recommended my favorite book of the entire year


  3. Steven Gilbert Steven Gilbert says:

    Just let me say If there was one book on my reading list from this past year that I would recommend people read it is Thank You For Your Service And not because it is relevant it is or because it returns to the extraordinary lives of those first mentioned in The Good Soldiers it does, tragically , or because the author s style, word choice and manner in which he shares these after war stories makes them all thereal they do Read it because there is no better written account of the h Just let me say If there was one book on my reading list from this past year that I would recommend people read it is Thank You For Your Service And not because it is relevant it is or because it returns to the extraordinary lives of those first mentioned in The Good Soldiers it does, tragically , or because the author s style, word choice and manner in which he shares these after war stories makes them all thereal they do Read it because there is no better written account of the heartbreaking, infuriating, mind blowing and often invisible reality of war and its never ending consequences on the heroes and families who served Read it because they deserve it


  4. Jennifer Jennifer says:

    Out of one war into another Two million Americans were sent to fight in Iraq and Afghanistan Home now, most of them describe themselves as physically and mentally healthy They move forward Their war recedes Some are even stronger for the experience But then there are the others, for whom the war endures Of the two million, studies suggest that 20 to 30 percent have come home with post traumatic stress disorder PTSD a mental health condition triggered by some type of terror, or trOut of one war into another Two million Americans were sent to fight in Iraq and Afghanistan Home now, most of them describe themselves as physically and mentally healthy They move forward Their war recedes Some are even stronger for the experience But then there are the others, for whom the war endures Of the two million, studies suggest that 20 to 30 percent have come home with post traumatic stress disorder PTSD a mental health condition triggered by some type of terror, or traumatic brain injury TBI which occurs when a brain is jolted so violently that it collides with the inside of the skull and causes psychological damage Depression, anxiety, nightmares, memory problems, personality changes, suicidal thoughts every war has its after war, and so it is with the wars of Iraq and Afghanistan, which have created some five hundred thousand mentally wounded American veteransevery war has its after war This is what this book discusses as it shows example after example after example of the real life impact of trauma Thank You for Your Service is a dark and heavy read The anguish of these veterans is palpable and it should be I imagine it s like any type of pain You will never fully understand unless you have experienced it yourself David Finkel excels at allowing his readers to live vicariously through the people he has interviewed Again, it s not pretty but it is absolutely necessary in order to gain an empathetic perspective Read this book and the next time you feel the urge to thank a veteran for his or her service, let it be the start of a conversation instead of just an annual statement Because unless we know what our precious veterans and their families have actually sacrificed, we have no idea what we are thanking them for My favorite quoteMost of all, they veterans in a rehabilitation program had heard explosion after explosion and seen dozens of Humvees disappear into breathtaking clouds of fire and debris, and by the end most of them had been inside such a cloud themselves, blindingly feeling around in those initial moments to determine if they were alive, or dead, or intact, or in pieces, as their ears rang and their hearts galloped and their souls darkened and their eyes occasionally filled with tears So they knew They knew And yet day after day they would go out anyway, which eventually came to be what the war was about Not winning Not losing Nothing so grand Just trying until it was time to go home and discovering that life after the war turned on trying again


  5. Gearóid Gearóid says:

    This book is the follow on to The Good Soldiers which you shouldreally read before starting this book.The Good Soldiers tell the true story of real soldiers on theirtour of duty in Iraq.Thank Your For Your Service is the story of how these young menwith horrendous mental and physical injuries try to adjust to normallife again after seeing,doing and experiencing terrible things thatnobody should have to go through It is really a very heartbreaking book to read as a lot of these youngmen are real This book is the follow on to The Good Soldiers which you shouldreally read before starting this book.The Good Soldiers tell the true story of real soldiers on theirtour of duty in Iraq.Thank Your For Your Service is the story of how these young menwith horrendous mental and physical injuries try to adjust to normallife again after seeing,doing and experiencing terrible things thatnobody should have to go through It is really a very heartbreaking book to read as a lot of these youngmen are really broken and as a result their families and relationshipssuffer terribly.When I was reading The Good Soldiers there were some characters whomI really admired as they seemed like real leaders,brave and decent men.Some of these same brave decent men then end up with PTSD and end upsuffering with anxiety,depression and anger issues but again you seethe same qualities I admired in the Good Soldier when I saw how hardthey fought to get well and to be as they were before the war withtheir families.I highly recommend this book and The Good Soldier as they are reallythe most hard hitting war books I have read and really shows the horrorof war at an individual level


  6. Mehrsa Mehrsa says:

    Wow What a gutting book I can t imagine beinganti war than I already was, but this book definitely removed any smidgen of doubt I had that these endless wars are destroying all of us but especially the men that we send out there to serve us Also, I would recommend Cherry as another great first hand account.


  7. Andrew Andrew says:

    David Finkel writes without adjectives Because his stories are powerful enough on their own I really can t say much about this book that will fairly reflect its emotion From the individual stories of broken men and families, to the military brass reviews of soldiers suicides every part strikes a blow to your heart These are the stories of the men whom a modern empire has tried to help after using them Or at worst, has spat them out and forgotten And the saddest realization is that innume David Finkel writes without adjectives Because his stories are powerful enough on their own I really can t say much about this book that will fairly reflect its emotion From the individual stories of broken men and families, to the military brass reviews of soldiers suicides every part strikes a blow to your heart These are the stories of the men whom a modern empire has tried to help after using them Or at worst, has spat them out and forgotten And the saddest realization is that innumerable troops never receive help, whether the generations who fought recently in the deserts or, indeed, older generations of the wartime jungles and fields of the twentieth century.Follow me on Twitter Dr_A_Taubman


  8. Mikey B. Mikey B. says:

    Given the subject matter this book is sobering and depressing Its about veterans returning from combat the examples are from the Iraq war and how their lives are shattered the war has destroyed their normality.We follow the lives of about 10 veterans and their wives The soldiers in this book are all male The relationship with their wives, if they were married before deployment, has altered forever and it certainly is not a better relationship.What they experienced in the war the indiffe Given the subject matter this book is sobering and depressing Its about veterans returning from combat the examples are from the Iraq war and how their lives are shattered the war has destroyed their normality.We follow the lives of about 10 veterans and their wives The soldiers in this book are all male The relationship with their wives, if they were married before deployment, has altered forever and it certainly is not a better relationship.What they experienced in the war the indifference and at times brutality to Iraqi civilians, seeing their comrades bodies mutilated and bleeding, having their own bodies and minds damaged never leaves them One veteran continually has dreams of a soldier friend dying right beside him and speaking to him.All are on several types of medication to enable them to sleep, to stop the dreams, to suppress senseless anger mostly with family members Some commit suicide, and most have thought of it and maybe attempted it.It would seem that war zone life is on such a vastly different plane than their normal life back home that these soldiers cannot re adjust The author makes a good point that while at war the soldiers are surrounded by comrades in arms they become dependent on each other Upon departure for home they are all alone and must cope by themselves.Their wives are obviously affected They suffer psychological abuse and sometimes physical abuse They may witness suicide attempts by their husbands with the children in the house too Some wives also end up taking medications They and their children face the full force of the anguish of the returning veterans They too are victims of war.As well, we get a view of how Veterans Affairs workers are impacted their lives are also on a burnt out.The after affects of war do not evaporate The suicide rate of veterans keeps increasing and at the time this book was written the rate was one per day This is an awful statistic reflecting wars permanence in the participants.As an additional note a possible flaw of this book is that there is no examination of veterans who have successfully re adjusted This book looks solely at those who are having severe problems It would be interesting to compare those who have adjusted well to the examples provided by this book


  9. Monica Monica says:

    Powerful Still thinking about what we expect of the men and women who serve during war in the 21st century proper rtf 4.5 StarsRead on kindle


  10. Jenny Novacescu Jenny Novacescu says:

    Next time someone has something negative to say about the military as a whole, you should hand them this book.


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