What the Chinese Don't Eat PDF/EPUB ð What the MOBI

What the Chinese Don't Eat ➶ [Reading] ➸ What the Chinese Don't Eat By Xinran ➫ – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Since June Xinran has been writing about China in her weekly column in the Guardian She has covered a vast range of topics from food to sex education, and from the experiences of British mothers who Since JuneXinran has been Chinese Don't PDF ✓ writing about China in her weekly column in the Guardian She has covered a vast range of topics from food to sex education, and from the experiences of British mothers who have adopted Chinese daughters, to whether Chinese people do Christmas shopping What the MOBI :Ê or have swimming poolsEach of her columns inspired letters and questions and opportunities for Xinran to shed light on the culture of her native land What the Chinese Don t Eat collects these pieces together for the first time to give one unique Chinese woman s perspective the Chinese Don't PDF/EPUB ¼ on the connections and differences between the lives of British and Chinese people today.


10 thoughts on “What the Chinese Don't Eat

  1. Daren Daren says:

    This book collects a number of newspaper columns written by the Chinese author in the UK, published in the Guardian in the UK There is definitely a pretty sad theme running through the majority of them the oppression of women in Chinese society.The author goes so far as to say that, based on her experiences and the many many stories told to her by Chinese women, she doesn t think there are very many good men of China To provide context, she wrote a book titled The Good Women of China H This book collects a number of newspaper columns written by the Chinese author in the UK, published in the Guardian in the UK There is definitely a pretty sad theme running through the majority of them the oppression of women in Chinese society.The author goes so far as to say that, based on her experiences and the many many stories told to her by Chinese women, she doesn t think there are very many good men of China To provide context, she wrote a book titled The Good Women of China Hidden Voices, and says she is often asked when she will write The Good Men of China She also makes the assertion in the introduction that men not only don t read her column, but that men don t read books by women authors I can t agree with that, even as a generalisation for myself I would be surprised if there were less than a third of books in my shelf by female authors It is probably only skewed that far by the fact that some of the genres that interest me are dominated numerically by male authors ie not by choice would I fill my shelves with male authors Anyway, my reviewing this proves her wrong What I do think about this book in particular, is that it is probably better received orsympathetically by a female readership perhaps this is what she meant by her comments.So to the review I did find these columns quite repetitive, and among the other books by this author that I have read, it is probably the weakest I think this is due to the presentation of the book the short columns don t really work Some address an issue to big too be covered in the small word count available, and are cut short or don t examine a broad enough context Others are confusingly presented, calling in examples that aren t quite working in the context Some are just repetitive along a similar theme Some were good, concise and informative, but too few for me.I have other books by Xinran that I haven t yet read, and this won t put me off, but for me this one fell short at two stars


  2. N N says:

    What the Chinese Don t Eat is a collection of columns that Xinran, a Chinese woman living in England, wrote for the Guardian In it, she reveals fascinating cultural differences between China and England However, the book is most poignant and interesting when she delves into how moving to the Western world, while China remains in a state of extreme flux, has fragmented her own cultural history On visits home, she finds that good and bad traditions that she grew up with are rapidly being erod What the Chinese Don t Eat is a collection of columns that Xinran, a Chinese woman living in England, wrote for the Guardian In it, she reveals fascinating cultural differences between China and England However, the book is most poignant and interesting when she delves into how moving to the Western world, while China remains in a state of extreme flux, has fragmented her own cultural history On visits home, she finds that good and bad traditions that she grew up with are rapidly being eroded so fast that she can t keep up.For someone who knows little about China, I enjoyed the glimpse of her country that Xinran provides, as well as her thoughts and feelings about multiculturalism Unfortunately, a glimpse is all that the book provides the necessity of pr cis in the columns makes for an unsatisfying read in book form Often, one feels that Xinran is only able to tell a very small part of the story The result for me, as a reader, was frequent frustration and confusion.It s still an interesting and worthwhile book I only wish it were meatier


  3. Kawtar Morchid Kawtar Morchid says:

    What a pleasure to read Xinran again These articles were like sweets to me No wonder why she is one of the most respected radio hosts in China I can tell from the way she writes that she is an amazing host She definitely writes the way she talks Love me some Xinran forever and always.


  4. Djkbhbhb Djkbhbhb says:

    WHAT THE CHINESE DON T EATI really think that the cover of this book is really terrible.How to describe it OH MY GOD When I looked this cover,I don t want to read this book any .Then let s talk about the name of this book WHAT THE CHINESE DON T EAT.I don t know why the writer create that name.It is not interesting and it may be boring for the most teenagers.


  5. Stacy Stacy says:

    One thing I love about LT and the group challenges is reading a book outside my normal selections The non fiction challenge started with a journalism category which is not an area I generally read about Most of my non fiction reading is history, science, or animal related Based on recommendations for this topic, I selected this book since I am generally interested in Asian culture This was a collection of essays that Xinran wrote for The Guardian in the early to mid 2000 s Though the collec One thing I love about LT and the group challenges is reading a book outside my normal selections The non fiction challenge started with a journalism category which is not an area I generally read about Most of my non fiction reading is history, science, or animal related Based on recommendations for this topic, I selected this book since I am generally interested in Asian culture This was a collection of essays that Xinran wrote for The Guardian in the early to mid 2000 s Though the collection was a bit dated it still provided a matter of fact look at different aspects of life in China


  6. Nelson Lourenço Nelson Lourenço says:

    Um livro que aconselho, j li todos os livros desta magnif ca escritora e n o para de me surpreender Quotes It is easier to clean up the leaves than the roots Chinese Traditional view there are three sorts of unfilial behaviour, of which the worst is to have no heirs Life is hard enough already, if you don t iron out your own frown lines, nobody else will do it for you No matter how her life turns out, my love will live in her blood and my voice in her heart In the west, a kiss is Um livro que aconselho, j li todos os livros desta magnif ca escritora e n o para de me surpreender Quotes It is easier to clean up the leaves than the roots Chinese Traditional view there are three sorts of unfilial behaviour, of which the worst is to have no heirs Life is hard enough already, if you don t iron out your own frown lines, nobody else will do it for you No matter how her life turns out, my love will live in her blood and my voice in her heart In the west, a kiss is just a kiss If only that were true where I come from The Chinese say everything starts from your foot unlike the english from the bottom The past is what makes up the roots of today we need it for our future Four students from America, Europe, Africa and China are asked by a journalist What s your personal opinion about the international food shortage The American replies What does international mean The European asks What is shortage The African asks What is food And the Chinese student says What do you mean by personal opinion What the chinese eat Everything that flies in the sky which you can see, except airplanes everything that swims in the river and the sea, except submarines any four legged things on the ground, except tables and chairs that is what we eat At least our hearts are made in China children grow like plants while the shape and form of the branch and its leaves may be very far from the roots, there is still a connection, through which they get support and mourishment Once there were two women who never knew each other One you do not remember, the other you call Mother Two different lives shaped to make you one One become your guiding star the other become your sun The first one gave you life, and the second taught you to live it The first gave you a need for love The second was there to give it One gave you a nationality The other gave you a name One gave you a talent The other gave you aim One gave you emotions The other calmed your fears One saw your first sweet smile The other dried your tears One sought for you a home that she could not provide The other prayed for a child and her hope was not denied And now you ask me, through your tears, The age old question unanswered through the years Heredity or environment, which are you a product of Neither, my darling Neither Just two different kinds of Love You can find kindness when you least expect it, no matter where you are We should leave hatred in the past love and hope are for the future Life looks different through different eyes When people ask me why I am lucky enough to have so many good friends and opportunities in my life, I answer that it is because I know a Chinese saying you can t keep a fish alive in completely clean water When something happens to me, I like to analyse why and what for which is the fish, which is the water and what do I want If I want the fish that is happy in that dirty water, I try to live with the dirty water if I need very clean water for something else, I have to give up the fish If you are a man, don t say you like to eat tofu Ai chi dou fu to your chinese friends that means you like sex A chinese philosopher once said A few right, soft words can match a thousand hard, powerful ones


  7. Morgana Morgana says:

    Eu j falei da autora, a chinesa Xinran, na resenha de outro livro viajante As boas mulheres da China Ela era uma apresentadora de r dio que resolveu dar voz aquelas que n o tinham voz para expressar seus sentimentos, dividir suas dores e espalhar suas opini es.Ela teve que praticamente fugir para a Inglaterra para publicar seu livro e para que as hist rias destas mulheres pudessem ganhar o mundo Assim ela vai viver em um mundo completamente novo e desconhecido pra ela, com costumes malucos e Eu j falei da autora, a chinesa Xinran, na resenha de outro livro viajante As boas mulheres da China Ela era uma apresentadora de r dio que resolveu dar voz aquelas que n o tinham voz para expressar seus sentimentos, dividir suas dores e espalhar suas opini es.Ela teve que praticamente fugir para a Inglaterra para publicar seu livro e para que as hist rias destas mulheres pudessem ganhar o mundo Assim ela vai viver em um mundo completamente novo e desconhecido pra ela, com costumes malucos e arte incompreens vel para sua mente e orienta es chinesas Alguns anos depois, j estabelecida neste novo pa s, ela come a a escrever colunas para o jornal ingl s The Guardian, contando curiosidades, costumes e diferen as de sua ancestral terra natal.H v rias refer ncias ao seus livros anteriores As boas mulheres da China e o romance Enterro Celestial romance no qual ela descreve a jornada de uma mulher chinesa rec m casada em busca do marido dado como morto no Tibete.N o um livro com forte carga emocional como As boas mulheres da China, j que se trata de apenas apanhados de cr nicas para um jornal Mas h v rias curiosidades e discrep ncias entre o modo de viver chin s e o modo de viver ocidental H v rias quest es importantes para o povo chin s como a rela o entre meias e status, as supersti es, o valor da liberdade de pensamento e atitudes, as marcas que as v rias revolu es deixaram na vida chinesa, principalmente das mulheres, os modos de compreens o e apreens o da Arte ocidental e oriental E principalmente, como a China atual, com pol tica de abertura lida com a crescente ocidentaliza o de suas vidas e cultura Como preservar tradi es milenares com o desenvolvimento vindo em dire o como um trem desgovernado e sem freio um bom livro de curiosidades e relatos de uma chinesa, que vivendo tanto tempo no ocidente, talvez nem saiba mais o que ser chinesa.resenha originalmente postada em www.estranhomundinhoinsano.blogspot.com


  8. Helmut Helmut says:

    Made in ChinaWieder einmal ein Buch, das offensichtlich keiner im Verlag gelesen hat anders kann man sich den zum Inhalt berhaupt nicht passenden Titel und Klappentext nicht erkl ren Wer den Klappentext liest, denkt, er hat ein weiteres dieser flachen Klischeeb cher vor sich, in dem sich ber kulturelle Unterschiede lustig gemacht wird Weit gefehlt.Die gesammelten Kolumnen der Journalistin Xinran aus dem Guardian lesen sich stellenweise komisch, mal melancholisch, mal traurig, mal alles z Made in ChinaWieder einmal ein Buch, das offensichtlich keiner im Verlag gelesen hat anders kann man sich den zum Inhalt berhaupt nicht passenden Titel und Klappentext nicht erkl ren Wer den Klappentext liest, denkt, er hat ein weiteres dieser flachen Klischeeb cher vor sich, in dem sich ber kulturelle Unterschiede lustig gemacht wird Weit gefehlt.Die gesammelten Kolumnen der Journalistin Xinran aus dem Guardian lesen sich stellenweise komisch, mal melancholisch, mal traurig, mal alles zusammen Selbst berfordert mit dem rasenden Tempo der Wandlung Chinas, l sst die Autorin Interviewpartner sprechen, sammelt Anekdoten und Erfahrungsberichte und kommentiert diese angenehm dezent Ihre Hilflosigkeit ist manchmal fast schon komisch, wenn sie versucht, Unterw sche Made in China zu erstehen und sie nirgends bekommt, oder die fu ballverr ckten Kollegen nachts um drei ihre Wohnung st rmen Dabei verf llt sie nie in einen Weichzeichnermodus oder ein zynisches Zeigefingerwinken die Thematik von M ttern und ausgesetzten Kindern ist ein roter Faden, der sich durch ihr Werk zieht sie prangert an, ohne zu verletzen.Die Taschenbuchausgabe des Knaur Verlags sticht neben der v llig unpassenden Titelgebung, einem unpassenden Cover und ebensolchen Textgestaltung mit d mmlich exotisierenden Kapit lchen in den Kapitel berschriften durch nichts hervor Standardpapier und bindung.Ein ruhiges und trotzdem mitrei endes Buch, das einem die selbstverst ndlich vorhandenen kulturellen Unterschiede zwischen China und Europa und auch zwischen China damals und China heute n her bringt als die Panikmacher und die Hochjubler der Bestsellerlisten.Menschlich, sympathisch, lesenswert


  9. Abigail01pd2019 Abigail01pd2019 says:

    In this novel, What the Chinese Don t Eat , Xinran examines the changes that China has undergone and reevaluates her own perceptions of Chinese culture She shows the differences between China and Britain, as well as her reactions towards the latter when she first immigrated Contrary to what the title suggests, she actually does not talk much about food, but rather unpractised Chinese traditions As many people say, 90% of culture is hidden, and Xinran reveals the uglier side of China that hid In this novel, What the Chinese Don t Eat , Xinran examines the changes that China has undergone and reevaluates her own perceptions of Chinese culture She shows the differences between China and Britain, as well as her reactions towards the latter when she first immigrated Contrary to what the title suggests, she actually does not talk much about food, but rather unpractised Chinese traditions As many people say, 90% of culture is hidden, and Xinran reveals the uglier side of China that hides behind sky scrapers and tranquil temples She speaks of fatal decisions young women made with a sense of bitterness, yet she shows poignancy in regards to the disappearance of her favourite aspects of Chinese culture The book is composed of unrelated newspaper articles that she wrote in her long career in journalism, so her attitude towards certain matters often seemed ephemeral, although it was just the composition of the novel I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to understandabout Chinese culture and its transformation It is also an easy read and does not take long to finish, so this would be ideal for anyone looking to understand something complex without the convolutedness that is usually synonymous with this topic I rated it 3 5 because despite the good points she made, I felt that some of the stories were a tad arbitrary Further, because these were originally articles, it was not as in depth as I would have liked it to be


  10. Yennie Yennie says:

    I found this in Hong Kong and picked it up because it was the only book printed in English, written by a Chinese writer, that wasn t published in America It s an informative, sometimes very thoughtful collection of Xinran s articles for The Guardian My biggest issue with it is that she often writes on topics too big to be covered adequately in her column, ending some articles just as she is beginning These truncated stories can be highly dissatisfying, and I think she does a disservice to the I found this in Hong Kong and picked it up because it was the only book printed in English, written by a Chinese writer, that wasn t published in America It s an informative, sometimes very thoughtful collection of Xinran s articles for The Guardian My biggest issue with it is that she often writes on topics too big to be covered adequately in her column, ending some articles just as she is beginning These truncated stories can be highly dissatisfying, and I think she does a disservice to them by focusing on unnecessary details or summarizing too much The writing is sometimes also too conversational or awkward, which I think some people might dismiss as a matter of English being her second language, but I m a Chinese American writer editor who has tutored immigrants from China, and I still don t understand her sometimes However, that issue is minor considering what the book taught me and what it s inspired in me I ll be sure to look out for her other books in the hope that her long form writing alleviates some of the issues I have with this work


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