☆ Shanghai Redemption Author Qiu Xiaolong – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk

Shanghai Redemption The System Has No Place For A Cop Who Puts Justice Above The Interests Of The Party It S A Miracle That I Survived As Long As I DidFor Years, Chen Cao Managed To Balance The Interests Of The Communist Party And The Promises Made By His Job He Was Both A Chief Inspector Of Special Investigations Of The Shanghai Police Department And The Deputy Party Secretary Of The Bureau He Was Considered A Potential Rising Star In The Party Until, After One Too Many Controversial Cases That Embarrassed Powerful Elements In The Party, Chen Cao Found Himself Neutralized Under The Guise Of A Major Promotion, A New Position With A Substantial Title But No Power, He S Stripped Of His Job Duties And Isolated But That S Still Not Enough, As It Becomes Increasingly Clear That Someone Is Attempting To Set Him Up, For Public Disgrace And Possibly Worse.Chen Cao Is Technically In Charge Of The Corruption Case Of A Red Prince A Powerful, High Party Figure Who Embodies The Ruthless Ambition, Greed, And Corruption That Is Increasingly Evident In The New China This Red Prince Has The Kind Of Connections And Power To Deflect Any Attempts To Bring Him To Justice Now With No Power, Few Allies, And With His Own Reputation On The Line, The Former Inspector Chen Is Facing The Most Dangerous Investigation Of His Career, And His Life.


10 thoughts on “Shanghai Redemption

  1. says:

    Conspiraciones en las altas esferas del poder La verdad se esconde entre oscuros callejones Las luces de ne n e Internet dejan entrever la silueta Los amigos es lo nico que le queda a Chen Cao para no acabar olvidado Esperar a que el viento sople a favor su nica esperanza.


  2. says:

    While this book started off quite sluggishly and took a while for this reader to get into the poetic prose and languid pacing, it eventually improved to sustain interest It was thought provoking to ponder the chaos and corruption faced by citizens trapped in an enlightened communist regime Thus the setting s ambiance proved a compelling and fascinating element Unfortunately, between the similarity of some names, titles, and all too frequent shifting locales, the enjoyment of following the meandering plot became annoying Moreover, ...


  3. says:

    It s a better book than the last one in the series The plot is pretty much straight out of recent headlines from China Bo Xi Lai, the dead pigs in the river in Shanghai, official corruption, but it is still fairly well done The most interesting things in the book deal with the food, the cemetery...


  4. says:

    From BBC Radio 4 Drama Inspector Chen finds himself promoted sideways from the Shanghai Police Bureau before narrowly escaping a night club trap and exposing a web of financial and sexual corruption Dramatised by John Harvey.Director David Hunter Shanghai Redemption is the 9th of Qiu Xiaolong s Inspector Chen novels, all 9 of which have been dramatised for BBC Radio 4 They have sold over 1 million copies and been translated into 20...


  5. says:

    I ve read several other books in this series, and generally find the author s portrayal of modern China to be riveting Since my last foray into his work, though, I ve actually visited Shanghai briefly On the one hand, I enjoyed the experience of recognizing some of the places he describes On the other, I have become a bit ti...


  6. says:

    This book held so much promise I m a big fan of this series and it appeared as if all of the elements were in place for a big payoff, but, in the end, poof We have Chen in a new position We have the whole host of characters his mother unresolved , Yu, Mr Gu, White Cloud, Melong,...


  7. says:

    Sloppy, lazy plotting cannot be redeemed by exotic locales The author is a Chinese translator and poet who now lives in the US He writes mostly about Shanghai His stories rely on quotes from both Chinese and English language poets, which would be nice in moderation but are overdone What is worse is the laziness of the writing The book s first section is all about a woman in another city who hires ex chief inspector Chen Cao to spy on a woman in Shanghai When he returns to Shanghai from the suburb, this work is not mentioned once as Chen starts investigating the cases he had right before his worrisome reassignment And when he meets the woman again, he doesn t even acknowledge that he was supposed to do something for her, instead asking her to investigate something for him And there are many other signs that the author barely read over his work People...


  8. says:

    Ninguna libro chino para mi en mucho tiempo, presentaci n cultural y pol tica de china a mi parecer bastante tedioso, Acaso Chen se la pas comiendo a lo largo de toda la trama


  9. says:

    Shanghai Redemption is one of the most complex mysteries I ve read in some time The plot lines are quite intense and very indirect This aspect of literature with an Asian flavor has always been great fun Chen is, himself, being hunted while trying to solve couple of cases before dealing with his promotion out of the Shanghai Police Fighting against the hidden enemy while trying to fulfill his code of justice and honor proves a captivating story.This story very much fits with the sequence begun in Enigma of China 8 in the Inspector Chen Cao series , but stands well enough on its own The interplay of technology internet, social media, flash drives, and the standard threads of politics and philosophy from much older eras is fascinating That said, the technology does not interfere with a great story.The literary content of this story is equal, in its way to anything Umberto Eco has done The interesting thing is that none of the poetry, philosophy, religion, and historical citations are redundant or simply add on decoration to the story plot They are all important to understand the full sense of what happens The range of reference is amazing From Eliot to ancient Chinese poets For me the most striking was the, again indirect, reference to Blake s Tiger which, as it turns out, is the pivot for understandin...


  10. says:

    First Sentence April is a cruel month, if not the cruelest.Chen Cao was on an upward track within the Shanghai Police Department and the Communist Party Now he has been promoted to a position with no power and few responsibilities He suspects, but can t prove, that he s being set up for disgrace Technically, Chen is in charge of a corruption case against a powerful Party figure But without any support, just because you re paranoid, doesn t mean they re not following you There are many reasons to read a book by Qiu Xiaolong, but one is how much one learns about a place, history, culture and people many of us will never visit What s even better is when the author has a style and voice that brings it all to live and makes us feel as though we are there Even the occasional awkwardness of the dialogue remind us that this is not a translation, but written by someone for whom Chinese his first language, which simply reinforces the sense of place.The literary and poetry quotations interspersed within the story, along with descriptions of meals crispy fried green onions and shredded port Qiun ordered plain noodles with peeled shrimp friend with Dragon Well tea leaves, in across the bridge style further add to a very clear sense of place and culture Xiaolong also makes us stop and consider To do nothing, it says in the...