[Ebook] ➡ Jerusalem Commands Author Michael Moorcock – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk


10 thoughts on “Jerusalem Commands

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    You have to hand it to Moorcock, there s few books where you could start in Hollywood and end up somewhere in the middle of the Sahara, barring touring a studio backlot and suffering a blow to the head that makes you think you re actually in Casablanca Here, we continue to track our favorite delusional sociopath across the world as he convinces everyone of his genius including us and then fails to provide any concrete evidence of said genius Three books in and he still hasn t learned his l You have to hand it to Moorcock, there s few books where you could start in Hollywood and end up somewhere in the middle of the Sahara, barring touring a studio backlot and suffering a blow to the head that makes you think you re actually in Casablanca Here, we continue to track our favorite delusional sociopath across the world as he convinces everyone of his genius including us and then fails to provide any concrete evidence of said genius Three books in and he still hasn t learned his lesson yet.At this point in the saga we re in the late twenties, and of all the periods of the twentieth century I find myself fascinated with that chunk of time between World War One and World War Two, which seemed like a great time to live if you wanted to walk around constantly with a sense of impeding doom that you couldn t quite define There s a school of thought that suggests not seeing WWI and WWII as two separate entities so much as one giant war that everyone decided to take a break and have a bit of a lie down for twenty years in between before getting back in the game, only with better tanks and roping in the rest of the planet that hadn t been leveled the first time around and an entirely new generation of people to pointlessly slaughter High fives all around, team.Meanwhile, Pyat continues to navigate the rather treacherous territory of those years in the same way that he managed the first twenty or so years, i.e by the skin of his teeth and with great confidence in his abilities to be awesome Readers already used to Pyat s rather nonstop woe is me for being so unrecognizably awesome asides some of which come out of nowhere so surprisingly that it s something like Moorcock slipped extra pages into the book while you re reading it, a not unimpressive feat will getof the same here, with extra sprinklings of Nazis being namechecked as we get closer and closer to the main event of the century This time around the self aggrandizing stuff doesn t seem as whiny, but it may be because it s dwarfed by the moments when he rails against the Jews or Carthage or both at the same time for reasons that make sense for the same reasons that a story told by a four year old makes sense, because it has its own internal logic that is incomprehensible to anyone but the person telling the story.But this time at least Moorcock varies the scenery enough that the constant change in venue trumps the moments when Pyat won t stop telling you how everyone is against him Getting him into the film industry is a variation on something we saw in the last volume but his attempts with the studio company to film an epic to end all epics on location in Egypt have a slightly different feel this time out, maybe because we can see the whole scenario falling apart before our eyes before Pyat realizes how deep he s gotten himself, and maybe because he s surrounded by a cast that acts almost completely opposite to what Pyat tells us their motivations are Whether its his still a minor and yes its still creepy betrothed or an assumed intellectual expert on Egypt who s almost as good at pulling stuff out of his butt as Pyat, or a black man that Pyat is condescendingly decent to its not fair to hold him to the higher standards of a different race, you see despite the fact that we re told in the introduction that he s a CIA spy and thus better at pretending that even Pyat isalmost nobody s actions gibes with how Pyat describes them, adding another layer to his oblivious state of delusion and shifting the focus from the walking disconnect that is Pyat, though we get plenty of that angle as well.Where the book shines is a fittingly disturbing sequence toward the middle where Pyat, his film production having run upon some rocky ground, finds himself in debt in ways that can be only be paid with what can be best be described as systematic sexual degradation, highlighting how easily he can shift into survival mode even in the most nightmarish of scenarios and how he s capable of waiting a situation out until better opportunities can make themselves known although he messes that up too It also puts his rationalizations on the backfoot briefly, although he recovers The continued portrayal of Mrs Cornelius is a highlight as well, as memorable as she was in the Cornelius Quartet, she s a force of nature here, terribly thick accent and all, often the smartest person in the room and proving how she was able to last long enough to make it to the Jerry Cornelius.Herethan any of the other books you start to get a sense that it exists almost sideways and parallel to the Cornelius books a Von Bek even makes an appearance late in the novel ,than once the brothers are mentioned as well as their sister and there are passing references to the other characters that often popped up there In a sense this is the real life version of all the Multiverse stuff happening in the Cornelius Quartet and yet its almost just as fantastic due to Pyat s pathological tendency to not tell us anything that we can take at face value, making it just as necessary to strip away the extraneous details to get to the real story Whether it s Moorcock s way of telling us that we need to chip away at history to find out what really happened or a way of demonstrating how a few people can convince themselves that a smoking trainwreck of a decade is actually not so bad, and then convince the rest of the world to go along with it To that end, the greatest moment of the novel is probably an instance close to the end having built another genius flying machine, Pyat is told that a person who tried to use it to escape crashed and burned which is what happens to anything he builds that s unlucky enough to make it to the testing stage However, Pyat assumes that since he s a flawless inventor he s being lied to and the escapee is off soaring somewhere safe and silently wishes them well, spending the rest of the novel thinking fondly of their great escape Its a kind of confidence in your incompetence that boggles the mind and yet when you see him survive travail after travail, you start to wonder, is he the kind of person that made the century the way it is, or is it a necessary mechanism to give yourself a better chance of maybe getting out alive


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Jerusalem Commands St Phoenix Trade Edition Paperback, Fine As New

  • Paperback
  • 576 pages
  • Jerusalem Commands
  • Michael Moorcock
  • English
  • 05 May 2019
  • 1857991877

About the Author: Michael Moorcock

Michael John Moorcock is an English writer primarily of science fiction and fantasy who has also published a number of literary novels Moorcock has mentioned The Gods of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Apple Cart by George Bernard Shaw and The Constable of St Nicholas by Edward Lester Arnold as the first three books which captured his imagination He became editor of Tarzan Adventures in 1956, at the age of sixteen, and later moved on to edit Sexton Blake Library As editor of the controversial British science fiction magazine New Worlds, from May 1964 until March 1971 and then again from 1976 to 1996, Moorcock fostered the development of the science fiction New Wave in the UK and indirectly in the United States His serialization of Norman Spinrad s Bug Jack Barron was notorious for causing British MPs to condemn in Parliament the Arts Council s funding of the magazine.During this time, he occasionally wrote under the pseudonym of James Colvin, a house pseudonym used by other critics on New Worlds A spoof obituary of Colvin appeared in New Worlds 197 January 1970 , written by William Barclay another Moorcock pseudonym Moorcock, indeed, makes much use of the initials JC , and not entirely coincidentally these are also the initials of Jesus Christ, the subject of his 1967 Nebula award winning novella Behold the Man, which tells the story of Karl Glogauer, a time traveller who takes on the role of Christ They are also the initials of various Eternal Champion Moorcock characters such as Jerry Cornelius, Jerry Cornell and Jherek Carnelian Inrecent years, Moorcock has taken to using Warwick Colvin, Jr as yet another pseudonym, particularly in his Second Ether fiction.