Trama d'infanzia PDF Ê Paperback


    Trama d'infanzia PDF Ê Paperback demanding daughter, Wolf attempts to recapture her past and to clarify memories of growing up in Nazi Germany."/>
  • Paperback
  • 488 pages
  • Trama d'infanzia
  • Christa Wolf
  • Italian
  • 23 November 2018
  • 8876411275

10 thoughts on “Trama d'infanzia

  1. Lisa Lisa says:

    I cried while reading this novel Tears just kept flowing silently, and there was nothing I could do about it If you want to know what totalitarian states do to children, this novel will tell you, without sentimentality, without blame or anger, without self pity.For all those emotions are forbidden ground for a child who was taught the dogma of national socialism and F hrer personality cult from the age of 4, who believed in the truth of what she was told in the same way a child taught the I cried while reading this novel Tears just kept flowing silently, and there was nothing I could do about it If you want to know what totalitarian states do to children, this novel will tell you, without sentimentality, without blame or anger, without self pity.For all those emotions are forbidden ground for a child who was taught the dogma of national socialism and F hrer personality cult from the age of 4, who believed in the truth of what she was told in the same way a child taught the truth of Christianity will believe in it, trained to follow the rituals and the patterns, to embrace the cult and its accompanying actions without ever having any choice as no alternatives are presented or accepted Waking up from that dream at 16, and realising there are multiple truths in the world, and that the one she has been trained to worship has caused the complete destruction of her own society and immeasurable evil and suffering for millions of innocent people, the narrator loses herself The words she uses on a daily basis receive a different meaning, the songs she sings are full of ominous hints that she never put into a wider context, her way to greet people with the German greeting , referring to Hitler, is not only insulting, it is dangerous as well Her values turn into vices, but her memory is not adjusted to that She still thinks in the category of purity when she sees a young man, then corrects her own thoughts in shame and confusion Purity , what is that If you believe in the superiority of your own country, race, ideology and biology, if you know nothing outside the narrow path of obedience, if you learn to read and write using the party line as a framework, if you study biology with the ideas of racial distinctions, if you participate in sports events to steel your body and mind to honour the deified person who dominates news and dictates thought patterns, how will your personality be shaped As opposed to the parent generation, who knew an alternative to Hitler s Third Reich, the protagonist Nelly grows up with no comparison until her world falls apart, drastically, suddenly, in her teenage years What happens to a psyche that has been systematically indoctrinated to believe in a system, and then wakes up to learn that it was pure evil What happens to childhood memories, filled with songs that make another kind of sense once they can be compared to the evidence of the Holocaust, to euthanasia programs, to total war, to destruction of unimaginable dimensions What happens to a person who has to ask how it could happen that all those people with whom she grew up embraced evil knowingly, willingly and almost automatically What happens when fear and shame are the two most dominant ingredients in your emotional cocktail Nelly is a writer, and in 1974, with the backdrop of the Vietnam war and her guilt regarding the suffering that never ends in the world, she sets out to make an account of her childhood years in a part of Germany that later became part of Poland A couple of years earlier, in 1971, she had taken her husband, her brother and her teenage daughter on a trip to revisit the town she left as a refugee in 1945, and her tale moves between the different times and places, reflecting on the child Nelly, who is she in the account, and the older visitor travelling down memory lane, reconstructing the past, who is addressed as you , and her current writing self, hardly present, but an implied I.There are no bridges between the different layers of identity before and after 1945 cannot be reconciled Symptomatic for the complete break is a situation in 1946 when Nelly s mother picks up her father from the train station He is returning from a mine in Siberia a broken man, almost starved to death She doesn t recognise him, and he doesn t recognise her either They walk past each other, as they are not familiar with the patterns of suffering that have left their marks on their respective bodies and minds After years of hoping for the return of the father, Nelly s family finally welcomes a stranger Nelly herself is a stranger as well, and has to learn that she lived unknowingly in a dictatorship which she thought of as absolute freedom Meeting survivors from concentration camps means realising that her reality was a fragile illusion, bound to be destroyed at some point And it means never ever allowing oneself to mourn the loss of childhood patterns which turn into symbols of the evil regime she believed in wholeheartedly, but which the older self, the historically educated narrator, abhors and fears Studying maps, reflecting on the geographical locations of the concentration camps, the narrator has slowly formed a new pattern for those years, one that must have existed simultaneously with her enthusiastic participation in the adolescent program of the local Hitlerjugend Born a few years earlier, she would have been guilty A few years younger, she wouldn t have experienced it A strange generation.As a mother, a teacher and a person who grew up in West Germany when the Berlin Wall still stood as a monument for the German 20th century catastrophe, I could not read this book without feeling terrified I was shaken by every single emotion the protagonist went through most of all the feeling of being split in two I imagine my own children growing up in an atmosphere of nationalism and hysterical belief in their own superiority, I imagine them having to submit to a pledge of allegiance to the flag every single morning, I imagine them singing patriotic songs excluding the rest of the world from their perfect home country, and I shiver Children are impressionable and eager to learn If I lived with them in a regime like that, would I exclude them from the mainstream cult, and thus put our family at risk Wouldn t I think of my family, my job, my home, my life Wouldn t I explain away the worst I don t know I do know that the Third Reich has left patterns in the childhoods of many generations long after the war itself was over I know it because I can t suffer the nationalist rhetoric that neo fascist regimes around the world like to use to get crowds cheering I know it because I can t stand CROWDS at all Mass meetings scare me People who are moved by loud, populist speakers scare me Symbols of exclusive clubs scare me I carry the patterns of the childhoods of German children growing up under that evil flag, and I won t let my children come near any institution that teaches exclusive rights to a special group of people Christa Wolf s book explains that inherited pain She talks about the identity crisis, the trauma, the split consciousness, and the fear The GROWING fear It could happen to us, so it can happen to anyone for we were just normal people that is the message from the novel to the world Don t ever believe it can t happen to you, because after the Second World War, we know that human beings are capable of anything if they are trained and brainwashed in a specific way We can even actively decide what to forget But patterns of childhood stick, regardless


  2. Steven Godin Steven Godin says:

    Love and death, illness, health, fear and hope left a deep impression in your memory Events that have been run through the filter of a consciousness that is not sure of itself sieved, diluted, stripped of their reality disappear almost without a trace Years without memory which follow the beginning years Years during which suspicion of sensory experience keeps growing Only our contemporaries have had to forget so much in order to continue functioning I happened to pick up Christa Wolf Love and death, illness, health, fear and hope left a deep impression in your memory Events that have been run through the filter of a consciousness that is not sure of itself sieved, diluted, stripped of their reality disappear almost without a trace Years without memory which follow the beginning years Years during which suspicion of sensory experience keeps growing Only our contemporaries have had to forget so much in order to continue functioning I happened to pick up Christa Wolf s powerful and finely sustained novel in a used book store about a month ago And it s condition was in a state of decay Faded text, badly damaged spine, and discolouring throughout the pages The book physically felt like a faded memory So for this type of read, it kind of felt right The prior reader owner or at least one of them highlighted the above passage with a Neon orange marker pen I probably would have done the same.Coming to terms with Germany s past is something that was clearly playing in the heart and mind of Christa Wolf during the writing process of her book This work is stripped of all elements that exist merely to give pleasure, as if she has refused the corrupt bourgeois palate and only has eyes to seek the most useful, nourishing of foods There is a considerable harsh beauty that resounds throughout this book that makes one feel numb, and even though it s written as fiction, it still manages to blur the lines with non fiction really well Published under GDR rule Wolf s main concern is looking at the years before the Second World War, the actual war years, and the bigger picture of Nazism in Germany, how this impacted people s past, future life and the country overall But the book is above all a memoir, an autobiographical piece, cleverly woven into the story of Nelly, a young girl growing up in Nazi Germany As Wolf couldn t write in the first person, she resorted to another one, of a different name This gives her the distance much needed to be able to expose, describe and remember things accurately, though she can still also fail with that Wolf cannot see herself in the flesh, as she would look when staring into the mirror When wandering back through the years she now sees a young girl, that is her, no doubt, but seems so different with her innocence, ignorance, full of hope and nativity How is she going to recognise herself into that girl It is their past that brings them together, for that is one and the same.The chain of internal monologues in the book are meant to show the inner quest for making sense of her own past which is part of the German people s past But at the same time everything becomes connected with the present day, with the history she is living in, the history of Germany, after having started off another World War, consciously killing people en mass and believing in an ideology that became self destructive Wolf constantly refers to her birthplace as former L that is now called G Landsberg Gorzow Wielkopolski and together with her younger brother Lutz, her husband, simply called H, and her daughter Lenka they embark a trip back to what used to be her hometown The narrative swings back and forward from the years looking at Nelly s life and that of her family, to the now early seventies under GDR rule as Wolf travels bringing back the past, and it s done in way without the need for her to let the reader know Like she is closing the gaps of the past with her the present self All this looking back raises questions that she does not pose to anyone but herself Reflecting on what the war did to her, her loves ones, and on how Nazism is viewed decades later by Germans who deny the knowledge of their mass extermination antics.This is no doubt a complex and difficult read, with two journeys going on simultaneously, heavy with meanings, with deeper questions underneath statements And even though the book came in at just over 400 pages long, for me it felt almost double that, because of the amount of details Wolf manages to cram in Her writing style took some getting used to, and had me thinking of Herta M ller and even Elfriede Jelinek, although I found Wolf s subject matter farinteresting, moving, and just overallengaging The last hundred pages were immensely affecting, as Nelly and her family come to terms with the horrors around them However much I did struggle in places, this is still a quite extraordinary testament to not only the darkest days of the 20th century, but also to the power of literature It is Wolf s vision of the fundamental strangeness of what seemed at the time simply an ordinary childhood in the loving surroundings of a normal family which makes her narrative so convincing and so pure I pondered for a while whether to give this four or five stars But felt it was worthy of a top rating


  3. BlackOxford BlackOxford says:

    Total War Total AmnesiaProust had his madeleine Wolf s Nelly has an infinity of objects beyond the Oder , in her pre war Prussian homeland, to evoke memories of her childhood But Proust had clarity, while Nelly s memories are fragmentary and unreliable, reflecting a very un Proustian ambiguityOne could be there and not be there at the same time, the ghastly secret of human beings in this century Nelly s family is unpolitical, that is to say, unconcerned about government and its activit Total War Total AmnesiaProust had his madeleine Wolf s Nelly has an infinity of objects beyond the Oder , in her pre war Prussian homeland, to evoke memories of her childhood But Proust had clarity, while Nelly s memories are fragmentary and unreliable, reflecting a very un Proustian ambiguityOne could be there and not be there at the same time, the ghastly secret of human beings in this century Nelly s family is unpolitical, that is to say, unconcerned about government and its activities beyond the usual mendacity and corruption of the local council Like most families, its main issues were Auntie Emmy s embarrassing act as a gypsy witch and disputes over the invisible children s territorial boundaries Life wasn t luxurious but it wasn t oppressive or unstable People got along.But so little engagement in governmental politics didn t mean a lack of politics tout court The politics of daily existence were learned at the dinner table and in the school yardThat obeying and being loved amount to one and the same thing A misdeed without consequences is no longer a misdeed To rejoice in undue praise The difficult job of sparing the parents The link between good deeds and well beingAnd perhaps the most important political precept of allNot to be normal is the worst thing by far These are the politics exploited by governments everywhere to achieve their ends Without these unseen, unremarked, ingrained, politics of the heart, government becomes impossible So when government becomes insane, it is only by the cessation of routine daily politics that its insanity can be controlled This is perhaps a lesson of acute relevance to the present day citizens of the United States who seem to have fallen into one of the periodic faux pas of democratic societies, one not dissimilar to that of Germany in 1933.Wolf suggests the signal for reconsidering the continuation of daily politics in the face of governmental insanityThe feeling that overcomes any living being when the earth moves underfoot is fearThis fear may be the sign to stop being normal, particularly within the family and its political sA family is an agglomeration of people of different ages and sexes united to strictly conceal mutually shared embarrassing secretsTo coin a phrase, good government begins at home and before the age of seven Knowing when it is necessary to suspend normal politics, to take to the streets in order to protect others at the expense of one s own interests, should not be one of the secrets If it is, then as Wolf says,Total war total amnesia


  4. Dhanaraj Rajan Dhanaraj Rajan says:

    First thing First A book of Great merit.The Plot The whole story can be summarized in two lines The person who had fled her hometown because of the war returns to it after 26 years And as she goes through her old hometown she reminisces about those days the past This is the plot and summery of the book.Or it can also be said as the effort to reconcile one s present self the adult to the past self the child It is very much visible from the poem of Pablo Neruda, that is quoted at the First thing First A book of Great merit.The Plot The whole story can be summarized in two lines The person who had fled her hometown because of the war returns to it after 26 years And as she goes through her old hometown she reminisces about those days the past This is the plot and summery of the book.Or it can also be said as the effort to reconcile one s present self the adult to the past self the child It is very much visible from the poem of Pablo Neruda, that is quoted at the very beginning of the novel itself.Let me quote the poem Where is the child I used to be, still within, or far away Does he know I never loved him,or that he never loved me Why when we grew up togetherdid we later grow apart Why when my childhood years were deaddidn t each of us die too And if my soul fell from my body,why does my skeleton remain When does the butterfly in flightread what s written on its wings But how does it become a great piece of literature 1 The historical background When a person realises that the historical backdrop is the WW II and the fact that the main protagonist was a normal German of those times , the value of the book gets established I have read many books on the WW II and most of them written from the perspective of the victor or the victim This is the first time I read a book by a German about those times, which we today divide them into pre war situation, the war and the post war situation All the historical facts that we know of the atrocities associated with the Nazism find their mention Only that in this novel it is seen with a German eye 2 The Literary technique The narration jumps from past to present very casually In the beginning the style can test you or try your patience But if you are patient just for 2 chapters 50 pages then it will seem very normal And you will slowly realise that that was the technique purposefully adapted by Christa Wolf For instance a word or a discussion or an object or a news story of the present day transports her to the past and vice versa and at times ends with sparkling reflections Moreover, the narration is divided into two sections the second person narrative and the third person narrative to correspond with the present state and the past state of the same person This technique is purposefully adapted by the author because being the person of today she wants to understand her own person childhood of the past And the reason was that both had different beliefs the childhood self was a member of Hitler Youth and the present self is very critical of it 3 Reflections on war, memory, past, guilt, fear, etc In her attempts to reconcile her present self to the past she comes up with reflections that are very sharp Specially her reflections on memory the memory and the emotion of guilt did really haunt her to death and guilt and the way they are expressed are frightening For instance, there is a place where she makes a distinction between the surviving and the living and that makes you to cry for her.Final Remarks 1 There is a character named Charlotte Jordan whom I adored I have heard many times from many of my friends that German women are strong in character and that was because it was them who ran the family when their husbands were far away fighting for their country That is attested to by Christa Wolf in this book too through the character of Charlotte Jordan.2 As one reads the book one will hate the war TheI read books on war theI hate it And in that sense, it is a must read for everyone.I will most probably read all of Christa Wolf s books


  5. dely dely says:

    I feel pretty stupid to rate it only with 3 stars seen that it has several high ratings and praising reviews, but my rating reflects also how much I enjoyed the reading experience Sadly, despite the interesting topic, I struggled really a lot to follow Wolf s writing style.The book seems autobiographical and we read about the life of a common German family during Nazi Germany We have the author that looks back to her life in a detached way, both when she was a child and a teen and she talks a I feel pretty stupid to rate it only with 3 stars seen that it has several high ratings and praising reviews, but my rating reflects also how much I enjoyed the reading experience Sadly, despite the interesting topic, I struggled really a lot to follow Wolf s writing style.The book seems autobiographical and we read about the life of a common German family during Nazi Germany We have the author that looks back to her life in a detached way, both when she was a child and a teen and she talks about herself in the third person singular and also when she, as an adult, went to visit her hometown now in Poland that she had to leave when the German army had been defeated by the Russian army and she talks about herself in the second person singular.I didn t dislike this detached way to talk about her life, because it shows also how difficult it is to look back to that time without wanting to judge or justify herself, her family and the common people The author tries to be objectiv though it isn t that easy seen that, though she was only a teen, she grew up with feelings of guilt when she realized only later what really had been going on in Germany during that time.It is a very interesting book but I had several problems with the writing style I struggled so much that despite the interesting topic, the book wasn t able to hold my interest Sadly I don t have a lot of patience with such writing styles


  6. Joselito Honestly and Brilliantly Joselito Honestly and Brilliantly says:

    How was it for an ordinary German family to have lived during Adolf Hitler s Nazi Germany Probably semi autobiographical, at least, although the author had written a disclaimer that all the characters here are the invention of the narrator and that none is identical with any person living or dead, the episodes described not coinciding with actual events Christa Wolf and the narrator in this novel named Nelly were both born in Landsberg, Warthe in 1929 when it was still a part of Germany How was it for an ordinary German family to have lived during Adolf Hitler s Nazi Germany Probably semi autobiographical, at least, although the author had written a disclaimer that all the characters here are the invention of the narrator and that none is identical with any person living or dead, the episodes described not coinciding with actual events Christa Wolf and the narrator in this novel named Nelly were both born in Landsberg, Warthe in 1929 when it was still a part of Germany This book was originally published in German in 1976, just about the time when Nelly starts narrating, memories of her childhood pushed forward when she, together with her daughter and older brother, revisits Landsberg now part of Poland and other nearby places of her young years She narrates not in the first person but in the second and third persons as she seemingly converses to her old self, going back and forth from the present to the past and vice verza like a pendulum.A great novel is said to be one where it can take you to some other places and times you ve never been and this one did precisely that to me I met the girl Nelly, and her family, who all believed in Hitler Her father joined the Nazi party and she herself joined Nazi youth organizations as was expected of young German children during those days when indoctrination on the Nazi ideology and the cult of the Fuhrer was an integral part of formal schooling She was a young teenager when the war ended and when the entire family had to flee from the conquering Russian forces Her father was captured during the latter stages of the fighting and after they had long thought him to be dead he suddenly reappeared, emaciated and much older looking after years of starvation Aged too by worries, her mother s appearance changed a lot too so that when her father showed up the couple failed to recognize each other Much later, they would learn that her aunt, touched in the head, whom they had thought to have died of illness while in a mental asylum, most likely was murdered one of the many victims of the state sponsored program of getting rid of Germany s misfits and inferior genes.But this in no Diary of Anne Frank For though Nelly s family was not spared from the horrors of war, neither were they completely immersed in it What stands out from this memoir like novel, for me, is how it showed the commonplace and ordinary during those turbulent times They have lived through unfortunate times but they were just like us, with our daily mundane concerns, with the same dreams, and would have lived the same uneventful lives had it not been for the accident of Hitler and the world war he had started


  7. Semjon Semjon says:

    Ich lese durchaus auch gerne mal eine Autobiografie Viel lieber mag ich allerdings einen Roman und diese Bezeichnung prangt auch auf der dtv Ausgabe von Christa Wolfs Werk aus dem Jahr 1976 Doch diese literarische Form ist hier nicht anzutreffen Vielmehr ist es eine Mischung aus Beiden, also eine fiktive Wirklichkeit Und genauso wie diese beiden Begriffe eigentlich nicht zueinander finden, habe ich nie einen Zugang zu diesem Buch gefunden Bislang hatte ich noch nie etwas von Christa Wolf ge Ich lese durchaus auch gerne mal eine Autobiografie Viel lieber mag ich allerdings einen Roman und diese Bezeichnung prangt auch auf der dtv Ausgabe von Christa Wolfs Werk aus dem Jahr 1976 Doch diese literarische Form ist hier nicht anzutreffen Vielmehr ist es eine Mischung aus Beiden, also eine fiktive Wirklichkeit Und genauso wie diese beiden Begriffe eigentlich nicht zueinander finden, habe ich nie einen Zugang zu diesem Buch gefunden Bislang hatte ich noch nie etwas von Christa Wolf gelesen Eigentlich kenne ich nur wenig Literatur aus der DDR Bedingt durch die Herausforderung, mehr B cher von Autorinnen zu lesen, griff ich zu diesem hier auf Goodreads viel gelobten Werk Wolf l sst in diesem Buch ihre eigene Geschichte in eine Fiktive einflie en, in dem Anfang der 70er Jahre eine Frau mit Tochter und Bruder von der DDR f r ein paar Tage nach Landsberg an der Warthe ins heutige Polen f hrt, dem Ort, in dem auch Christa Wolf geboren wurde Das Buch l uft ber mehrere Zeitebenen, wobei die Zeit vom Nachkriegsende bis zur Gegenwart eigentlich nahezu ausgeblendet wird Christa Wolf will Parallelen aufzeigen, zwischen dem Verhalten in der Nazizeit und dem Muster, in denen wir heute gefangen sind Leider tut sie das nicht in einer Romanform, sondern der Stil machte auf mich eher den Eindruck eines Essays, einer Rede oder dem zwanglosen Plauderton an Omas Kaffeetisch, wenn von fr her geredet wurde So anstrengend unstrukturiert springt die Autorin dann auch zwischen den Zeitebenen und den unz hligen Personen, die die Familie Jordan in den Jahren begleitet hat Dabei kommt Christa Wolf nie ins Erz hlen, sondern ist st ndig am Beschreiben und Erkl ren Es bleibt kein Platz f r Phantasie, d.h ich als Leser musste mir nichts vorstellen oder ausmalen Tante Christa erkl rte mir ihre Welt Manch Jugendbuchautor wird immer wieder vorgeworfen, mehr zu zeigen und nicht zu beschreiben F r diese literarische Form gilt das wohl nicht und daher hnelt es f r mich auch eher einer Biografie Ich finde es interessant, die Lebensgeschichten von besonderen Menschen beschrieben zu bekommen, doch wenn es fiktiv wird, dann st rt mich dieser Schreibstil arg Insofern kann ich nicht sagen, dass ich das Buch gemocht habe und daher bleiben nur 2 Sterne brig Diesen zweiten Stern hat das Buch aufgrund des Einflie ens von realen historischen Bez gen in die Erz hlung bekommen Diese werde immer wieder als eine Art von Nachrichten in den Text eingebettet, ob es nun ber Goebbels oder ber Pinochet geht Diese Form der Collage fand ich gut, aber die fiktiven Figuren blieben mir bis zuletzt gleichg ltig Da ist mir jedes westdeutsche Werk der Nachkriegsliteratur, welches die Zeit des Dritten Reichs aufarbeitet, lieber Sicher bin ich in diesem Punkt auch etwas ungerecht der Autorin gegen ber, denn immerhin h tte sie in den 70er Jahren nie die M glichkeit gehabt, Parallelen zwischen einem totalit ren System des Faschismus und des Sozialismus zu ziehen Auf diese Idee w re sie ja auch gar nicht gekommen, denn Christa Wolf hat oft genug betont, dass sie die DDR geliebt hat Auch ber ihre Stasi T tigkeit hat sie offen gesprochen Ich will dies gar nicht verurteilen an dieser Stelle, doch muss das jedem Leser bewusst sein, dass die Aufarbeitung des Dritten Reichs bei ihr im Jahr 1945 endet F r einen Anh nger von Grass oder B ll ungew hnlich Christa Wolf stellt ihre Hauptperson im Buch als Anh ngerin von Hitler dar, f r die eine Niederlage im Krieg undenkbar erscheint Zudem beschreibt sie das Leben in der kleinb rgerlichen Idylle als durchaus lebenswert Das mag f r DDR Verh ltnisse in den 70er Jahren mutig gewesen sein Gute Literatur ist f r mich aber zeitlos, und dieses Buch wirkt auf mich unvollst ndig und berholt


  8. Alexandra Alexandra says:

    Dieses Werk von Chista Wolf polarisiert offensichtlich sehr stark zwischen v lliger Begeisterung und totaler Ern chterung und ehrlich gesagt konnte ich pers nlich beide Positionen gleicherma en nachvollziehen, wodurch sich meine Beurteilung konkret in der Mitte manifestiert Stilistisch und erz hltechnisch war es extrem m hsam, so indirekt, so verkopft, so verklausuliert durch die vielen fiktiven Figuren, R ckblenden und auch durch die massiven Gedankenspr nge Am schlimmsten habe ich die Plotko Dieses Werk von Chista Wolf polarisiert offensichtlich sehr stark zwischen v lliger Begeisterung und totaler Ern chterung und ehrlich gesagt konnte ich pers nlich beide Positionen gleicherma en nachvollziehen, wodurch sich meine Beurteilung konkret in der Mitte manifestiert Stilistisch und erz hltechnisch war es extrem m hsam, so indirekt, so verkopft, so verklausuliert durch die vielen fiktiven Figuren, R ckblenden und auch durch die massiven Gedankenspr nge Am schlimmsten habe ich die Plotkonstruktion empfunden, diese fiktive Biografie dieser Abstand zu den Figuren diese Selbstanalyse sowas kann ich gar nicht ausstehen und diese 3 5 Zeitebenen in fast jedem Absatz Krieg, 74 und dazwischen.Aber so m hsam ich mich durchqu lte, muss ich der Autorin schon den Verdienst lassen, dass dieser uns gliche Stil nicht ausschlie lich dazu da w re, den Leser b se zu qu len, sondern auch eindeutig eine Botschaft vermittelt die Zerrissenheit, die Verdr ngung und die Schizophrenie dieser Generation Dadurch zieht sie auch einen Bogen von der Kriegsgeneration bis in die Jahre von 1975 Wenn das ganze Werk jetzt auch noch intellektuell eitel w re, indem es diesen Stil vermittelt, h tte ich die Autorin eh schon b se abgestraft, aber ich nehme Christa Wolf zudem ab, dass sie eben als Kind dieser Zeit so kompliziert ist und mir das authentisch pr sentiert Ja so sch tze ich ihren Roman ein intellektuell spr de, verschachtelt, ein Werk, in dem man das Gef hl hat, im Hirn bzw der Imagination der Frau Wolf zuerst Tonnen von Masken, Schichten und Spinnweben wegzur umen, bis man zu Pudels Kern kommt Und das ist auch das, was sie mir von dieser Generation mitgegeben hat Einen Ausbund an Verdr ngungmechanismen, die erst durch einen Schlagbohrer entfernt werden mussten, um die Essenz der Protagonistin beziehungsweise, da sie ja so umfassend Personal einf hrte die Essenz des des gesamten Deutschen Volkes freizuschrammen Und das macht sie schmerzhaft mit jeder einzelnen verdammten Stimmung Begeisterung, Sportsgeist, Heldenverehrung, Lehrerverehrung, Hitlerverehrung, Corpsgeist, Abwertung von anderen, Umwandlung von Angst in Hass, Verrohung und Herabsetzung von Ausl ndern, Armen und kranken Menschen, Fl chtlingenIm Prinzip wird in einem Rundumschlag eine jede Gef hlsregung des Deutschtums seziert, auseinandergenommen und auf die Familie der Protagonistin bertragen Dies gibt mir als Leserin auf sehr beschwerliche Weise ein tiefes Verst ndnis des Deutschtums und wie so etwas passieren konnte.Ob sich die M he gelohnt hat, ist nun der Knackpunkt, und da bleibe ich bei fivty fivty Ein bisschen zu lang hat mir die Anstrengung schon gedauert, wenn ich einen Monat f r ein Buch brauche und dann auch noch eine kleine Pause dazwischen, weil ich es nicht mehr aushalte Lesen sollte zwar nicht nur Vergn gen bereiten, aber nur Qual ist auch ein bisschen zu viel Ich geh re nicht zu den Literaturflagellanten Fazit Die Botschaft des Romans ist gut und bei mir angekommen Der Weg ber den Dachboden des Geistes und der Imagination der Protagonistin und der Autorin war mir aber ein bisschen zu staubig P.S Ach ja dann habe ich auch noch einen kapitalen intellektuellen Schnitzer in dem so auf intellektuell getrimmten Werk gefunden Im Jahr der Olympiade , ein Oxymoron, wo es doch 4 Jahre sind Erwischt Frau Wolf, erwischt Surkamp Lektorat


  9. Tania Tania says:

    This novel is Christa Wolf s fictionalized account of growing up in Nazi Germany This is a story about war, history, memory, and learning from our mistakes It is positively gripping The author manages, as another reviewer noted, to show that the tyranny of the Nazi regime was difficult for non Jews as well as Jews, without in any way minimizing the horror of the Holocaust I literally couldn t put this book down in parts. it is that powerful Wolf doesn t sentimentalize the story She makes This novel is Christa Wolf s fictionalized account of growing up in Nazi Germany This is a story about war, history, memory, and learning from our mistakes It is positively gripping The author manages, as another reviewer noted, to show that the tyranny of the Nazi regime was difficult for non Jews as well as Jews, without in any way minimizing the horror of the Holocaust I literally couldn t put this book down in parts. it is that powerful Wolf doesn t sentimentalize the story She makes all the people in the book seem real The descriptions of events were so real that felt as though I was there I have been forever changed by this book It has given me new insight not only into WWII, but also into myself, because it s given me a way to look into my own past As Wolf writes, What is past is not dead it is not even past We cut ourselves off from it we pretend to be strangers Ultimately, this passage sums up the theme of the movel, and, as a result, it broadens the scope of the book so that it has a message for everyone, even beyond its obvious messages about war and Nazism Those interested in history, or psychology, or who like character driven novels, will likely love this book I know that it is not easily available Despite that, I urge you to try to find a copy, be it through your local library or through a used book store


  10. Katy Derbyshire Katy Derbyshire says:

    What an impressive personal experiment in writing on the boundaries of fiction and memoir The novel has an intricate structure A narrator describes, addresses and admonishes her adult self in the second person while detailing the writing process over several years in the early 1970s, including political and private occurrences Along with her brother, husband and daughter, she visits the village where she grew up under the Nazis, now in Poland And this visit is interspersed with the narrative What an impressive personal experiment in writing on the boundaries of fiction and memoir The novel has an intricate structure A narrator describes, addresses and admonishes her adult self in the second person while detailing the writing process over several years in the early 1970s, including political and private occurrences Along with her brother, husband and daughter, she visits the village where she grew up under the Nazis, now in Poland And this visit is interspersed with the narrative of her childhood, which is told in the third person It s magnificently and beautifully done Wolf s Nelly is subtly infused with Nazi ideology while her narrator feels only horror for what her childish self believed And the narrator struggles to find the right way to tell Nelly s story without finding excuses for her and her family, and also to confront the fear and other emotions she felt after the end of the war The deliberately distanced perspective makes Kindheitsmuster a fascinating read, which tells us a great deal about the Third Reich but also about the GDR and also about the difficulties of writing about the self without romanticising I think she succeeded


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Trama d'infanzia[Ebook] ➩ Trama d'infanzia By Christa Wolf – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk This novel is a testament of what seemed at the time a fairly ordinary childhood, in the bosom of a normal Nazi family in LandsbergReturning to her native town in East Germany forty years later, accom This novel is a testament of what seemed at the time a fairly ordinary childhood, in the bosom of a normal Nazi family in LandsbergReturning to her native town in East Germany forty years later, accompanied by her inquisitive and sometimes demanding daughter, Wolf attempts to recapture her past and to clarify memories of growing up in Nazi Germany.


About the Author: Christa Wolf

Novelist, short story writer, essayist, critic, journalist, and film dramatist Christa Wolf was a citizen of East Germany and a committed socialist, and managed to keep a critical distance from the communist regime Her best known novels included Der geteilte Himmel Divided Heaven, , addressing the divisions of Germany, and Kassandra Cassandra, , which depicted the Trojan WarShe won awards in East Germany and West Germany for her work, including the Thomas Mann Prize in The jury praised her life s work for critically questioning the hopes and errors of her time, and portraying them with deep moral seriousness and narrative power Christa Ihlenfeld was born March , , in Landsberg an der Warthe, a part of Germany that is now in Poland She moved to East Germany in and joined the Socialist Unity Party in She studied German literature in Jena and Leipzig and became a publisher and editorIn , she married Gerhard Wolf, an essayist They had two children Christa Wolf died in December Bloomberg News.