[ Download ] ➽ What Is Zen?: Plain Talk for a Beginner's Mind Author Norman Fischer – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk



10 thoughts on “What Is Zen?: Plain Talk for a Beginner's Mind

  1. says:

    This slim volume was a really great tool in getting my footing in the Zen tradition, its history, and its doctrines Before diving into the book, I felt iffy about the FAQ setup of the text, but I soon found this back and forth between Moon and Fischer to be endearing, and to make the concepts of Zen quite relatable and friendly to the reader I wouldn t recommend this book to anyone who wants specifics on meditation, it s gearedtowards those who want a survey of Zen and all it encompasses This slim volume was a really great tool in getting my footing in the Zen tradition, its history, and its doctrines Before diving into the book, I felt iffy about the FAQ setup of the text, but I soon found this back and forth between Moon and Fischer to be endearing, and to make the concepts of Zen quite relatable and friendly to the reader I wouldn t recommend this book to anyone who wants specifics on meditation, it s gearedtowards those who want a survey of Zen and all it encompasses including its history, traditions, relationship with the arts, and how it has been implemented throughout the West All in all, I found it an extremely enlightening and helpful read


  2. says:

    I discovered


  3. says:

    This is a good, basic introduction to Zen Buddhism, which focuses primarily on the American practice and its Japanese origins via China and India I loved how the book was set up as questions and answers, which was similar to the Jewish way of exploring faith One of the authors was raised Jewish and since I m a Jew too, this resonated with me The book describes Zen is a religion without a deity, which makes it compatible with other religions such as Judaism, Christianity and national religio This is a good, basic introduction to Zen Buddhism, which focuses primarily on the American practice and its Japanese origins via China and India I loved how the book was set up as questions and answers, which was similar to the Jewish way of exploring faith One of the authors was raised Jewish and since I m a Jew too, this resonated with me The book describes Zen is a religion without a deity, which makes it compatible with other religions such as Judaism, Christianity and national religions Although the authors don t mention Shintoism, I can now understand how Japanese temples combine native spiritual Shintoism with imported Buddhism This explains how Buddhism spread so easily to other countries since it supplements indigenous religions without replacing them Zen is even compatible with Atheism The authors explain how American Zen Buddhism has evolved to welcome women and the LGBTQ community, although there arewhite European Americans converts than PoC converts I read this book, along withadvanced Zen Buddhist texts, to research my young adult novel set in Japan It was a quick and easy read, which I finished in one afternoon This short book would crossover well to a teen audience


  4. says:

    I bought this book from Norman directly, and when I told him that I have a daily Buddhist practice he told me that Plain Talk for a Beginner s Mind did not mean this book was simple And indeed it is not, though it is easy to read In the form of questions and answers, it combines Fischer s extensive knowledge with his ability to teach simply In the end, though, it rather discouraged me in an odd fashion Fischer admits in these pages that intensive Zen practice will not necessarily transform I bought this book from Norman directly, and when I told him that I have a daily Buddhist practice he told me that Plain Talk for a Beginner s Mind did not mean this book was simple And indeed it is not, though it is easy to read In the form of questions and answers, it combines Fischer s extensive knowledge with his ability to teach simply In the end, though, it rather discouraged me in an odd fashion Fischer admits in these pages that intensive Zen practice will not necessarily transform the person, who may remain as crotchety and judgmental as ever But the practice will make the practitioner happier And I guess that is a large part of what Buddhism is all about Surprising, huh, given the premise that the First Noble Truth is sufffering


  5. says:

    I purchased this book for a very modest price in a store I visited primarily to buy incense It was a sympathy buy but I should have known better, for this store was also the type to peddle in healing crystals, astrological calendars, and other such bullshit.I have twice attempted to wrap my mind around Zen, the first from D.T Suzuki, the second time from Alan Watts Both times I felt the subject to be lacking in substance, but also felt a richness lay beyond the horizon which could be I purchased this book for a very modest price in a store I visited primarily to buy incense It was a sympathy buy but I should have known better, for this store was also the type to peddle in healing crystals, astrological calendars, and other such bullshit.I have twice attempted to wrap my mind around Zen, the first from D.T Suzuki, the second time from Alan Watts Both times I felt the subject to be lacking in substance, but also felt a richness lay beyond the horizon which could be understood, if only presented in a modern, less esoteric style This book, published in 2016, presented itself as a remedy.This book contains a very substantive discussion on the difficulty of translating East Asian languages, which, it is suggested, accounts for much of the confusion regarding Zen in the West I concede this is an important point, but also one of limited usefulness when Sun Tzu tells us the war is won before it is fought, I do not consider the gist of his statement to be opaque The book then retreats into that which cannot be explained mumbo jumbo Well, that, and some words about breathing and sitting facing the wall a kind of spiritual stalemate, it would seem Bertrand Russell s A History of Western Philosophy, which I am currently reading, does lend some perspective on Zen in the West I think Russell would characterize the emergence of Zen and of healing crystals as a product of lingering cultural Romanticism, a pushback against science and positive philosophy in favor of the ethereal, the mystical, and the exotic read mistranslated Orient.It may be the case that Zen, as it exists here, is not designed to be understood, but is reallyof a therapeutic exercise intended for those whose spiritual needs defy conventional means of resolution


  6. says:

    This book was a great introduction to the world of Zen The topics covered just skim the surface and leave room to dive intodepth The questions answered in this book were mostly ones beginners might have when wanting to emerge themselves into Zen Though Zen is a religion by this books standards it can also be looked at asof a way of life For me this book gave me the perspective that I personally have to interpret Zen the way I want to see it and not through the eyes of someone el This book was a great introduction to the world of Zen The topics covered just skim the surface and leave room to dive intodepth The questions answered in this book were mostly ones beginners might have when wanting to emerge themselves into Zen Though Zen is a religion by this books standards it can also be looked at asof a way of life For me this book gave me the perspective that I personally have to interpret Zen the way I want to see it and not through the eyes of someone else Overall be positive, love one another, and know there will be hard times in your life


  7. says:

    Susan Moon asks the questions, that we all have about Zen Buddhism, and Norman Fischer has informed, insightful answers Sure there were plenty of times throughout this book when I wanteddetails,references for further reading, but overall this is a good book.I m really glad I read this book and I ll treasure it for years to come.


  8. says:

    I don t know


  9. says:

    I enjoyed this book.


  10. says:

    Caring for a practice throwing your hat over the fence.


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What Is Zen?: Plain Talk for a Beginner's Mind An Accessible And Enjoyable Introduction To Zen Buddhist Practice In A Reader Friendly Question And Answer Format By Two Highly Regarded Teacher Writers.The Question And Answer Format Makes This Introduction To Zen Especially Easy To Understand And Also To Use As A Reference, As You Can Easily Look Up Just The Question You Had In Mind The Esteemed Zen Teacher Norman Fischer And His Old Friend And Teaching Colleague Susan Moon Both Of Them In The Lineage Of Shunryu Suzuki, Author Of Zen Mind, Beginner S Mind Give This Collaborative Effort A Playful Tone Susan Asks A Question On Our Behalf, Norman Answers It, And Then Sue Challenges Him By The Time You Get Through Their Conversations, You Ll Have A Good Basic Education In Zen Not Only The History, Theory, And Practice But Also The Contemporary Issues, Such As Gender Inequality, Sexual Ethics, And The Tension Between Asian Traditions And The Modern American Reality.