Last Words: The Final Journals of William S. Burroughs


Last Words: The Final Journals of William S. Burroughs ➳ [Reading] ➶ Last Words: The Final Journals of William S. Burroughs By William S. Burroughs ➩ – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk William Burroughs died in August , after a lifetime of notoriety In his final years, he was writing only in his journals The last nine months of his diaries are here, in Last Words, and they form a co William The Final Journals of Epub / Burroughs died in August , after a The Final eBook ´ lifetime of notoriety In his final years, he was writing only in his journals The last nine months of his Last Words: PDF/EPUB ² diaries are here, in Last Words, and they form a complex, rarely seen, personal portrait of Burroughs at the end of his life, coming to terms with aging and Words: The Final PDF/EPUB À death.

  • Unknown Binding
  • 293 pages
  • Last Words: The Final Journals of William S. Burroughs
  • William S. Burroughs
  • English
  • 05 September 2017
  • 0006552188

About the Author: William S. Burroughs

William The Final Journals of Epub / Seward Burroughs II, also known by his The Final eBook ´ pen name William Lee February , August , was an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, painter, and Last Words: PDF/EPUB ² spoken word performer A primary figure of the Beat Generation and a major postmodernist author, he is considered to be one of the most politically trenchant, culturally influential, and Words: The Final PDF/EPUB À innovative artists of the th century His influence is considered to have affected a range of popular culture as well as literature Burroughs wrote novels and novellas, six collections of short stories and four collections of essays Five books have been published of his interviews and correspondences He also collaborated on projects and recordings with numerous performers and musicians, and made many appearances in filmsHe was born to a wealthy family in St Louis, Missouri, grandson of the inventor and founder of the Burroughs Corporation, William Seward Burroughs I, and nephew of public relations manager Ivy Lee Burroughs began writing essays and journals in early adolescence He left home in to attend Harvard University, studied English, and anthropology as a postgraduate, and later attended medical school in Vienna After being turned down by the Office of Strategic Services and US Navy in to serve in World War II, he dropped out and became afflicted with the drug addiction that affected him for the rest of his life, while working a variety of jobs In while living in New York City, he befriended Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac, the mutually influential foundation of what became the countercultural movement of the Beat GenerationMuch of Burroughs s work is semi autobiographical, primarily drawn from his experiences as a heroin addict, as he lived throughout Mexico City, London, Paris, Berlin, the South Americanand Tangier in Morocco Finding success with his confessional first novel, Junkie , Burroughs is perhaps best known for his third novel Naked Lunch , a controversy fraught work that underwent a court case under the US sodomy laws With Brion Gysin, he also popularized the literary cut up technique in works such as The Nova Trilogy In , Burroughs was elected to the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, and in was awarded the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by France Jack Kerouac called Burroughs the greatest satirical writer since Jonathan Swift , a reputation he owes to his lifelong subversion of the moral, political and economic systems of modern American society, articulated in often darkly humorous sardonicism J G Ballard considered Burroughs to be the most important writer to emerge since the Second World War , while Norman Mailer declared him the only American writer who may be conceivably possessed by geniusBurroughs had one child, William Seward Burroughs III , with his second wife Joan Vollmer Vollmer died in in Mexico City Burroughs was convicted of manslaughter in Vollmer s death, an event that deeply permeated all of his writings Burroughs died at his home in Lawrence, Kansas, after suffering a heart attack in .



10 thoughts on “Last Words: The Final Journals of William S. Burroughs

  1. Sophy H Sophy H says:

    The most poignant parts of this book were the ones referring to his pet cats Awww did he love his feline friends Otherwise I found the book a bit too disjointed and rambling, even for Burroughs It felt as though the editors just gathered up as many pieces of scrap paper from Burrough s place after he died and then just printed what was on them to get the punters in Felt marginally exploitative.

  2. Adriana Santillan Ahumada Adriana Santillan Ahumada says:

    This guy loved his kittys like nothing else Nice to see a junky in the light of day Living a simple life and reflecting on a wild past Very soft and at times sad At his age you are mostly saying goodbye to people and places I thought it was very cute.

  3. Dan Dan says:

    In the last nine months of his life, Beat novelist William S Burroughs began keeping a journal In it, he looks back at his career as a writer, comments on the books he is reading e.g Under Western Eyes, The Last Don, Invasion, The Night Manager and writes down his observations with regard to a number of subjects including art, weapons, the psychoanalytic industry and the war on drugs.Unlike many published journals by other writers, The Last Words of William S Burroughs does not appear to h In the last nine months of his life, Beat novelist William S Burroughs began keeping a journal In it, he looks back at his career as a writer, comments on the books he is reading e.g Under Western Eyes, The Last Don, Invasion, The Night Manager and writes down his observations with regard to a number of subjects including art, weapons, the psychoanalytic industry and the war on drugs.Unlike many published journals by other writers, The Last Words of William S Burroughs does not appear to have been edited to minimize redundancy There is a lot of repetition here, for instance of a passage in which two T men interrogate a bootlegger, and which appears to be part of a work of fiction Burroughs planned to write each time the passage appears, there are small changes, suggesting that Burroughs is revising it each time he writes it In another instance of repetition, Burroughs works on the plot for a film he wants to write about an invasion by extra terrestrials Other repetitions include lines from poems, quoted phrases and comments on things Burroughs is thinking about.I think the editors were correct to leave Burroughs s repetitions in while it may not be necessary for the reader to read Burroughs s quoting Timothy Leary s last words multiple times, it is useful to see that Burroughs thought the words important enough to write down multiple times in his journal from these repetitions and from others, of lines from Alfred Lord Tennyson s Ulysses and from Matthew Arnold s Dover Beach, for instance, and of Allen Ginsberg s last words one gets the sense of a man nearing the end of his life whose mind keeps returning to the same things.This journal reflects Burroughs at his most private and vulnerable A lover of cats, he lost two during the time he wrote this journal, and one gets the sense from his comments on how deeply these events in particular affected him

  4. Mat Mat says:

    Burroughs bows out in style with a very humanistic touch..Burroughs final journals are a rich, elegant, humorous and singular collage of a great mind at work..the journals are a highly original amalgam of famous quotes the No glot, clom Fliday quote is finally explained for example , fleeting memories of his boyhood at Los Alamos or times in Tangier and Paris with Brion Gysin , London, Mexico, homages to Allen Ginsberg who had just passed away and current preoccupations such as his cats or Burroughs bows out in style with a very humanistic touch..Burroughs final journals are a rich, elegant, humorous and singular collage of a great mind at work..the journals are a highly original amalgam of famous quotes the No glot, clom Fliday quote is finally explained for example , fleeting memories of his boyhood at Los Alamos or times in Tangier and Paris with Brion Gysin , London, Mexico, homages to Allen Ginsberg who had just passed away and current preoccupations such as his cats or the sorry and oppressive conditions of the police state in the US.I was surprised to learn that Burroughs believed in God I really liked his comment that people who don believe in ESP haven t kept their eyes open I couldn t agree with himthe older I get the clearer it becomes that to some extent it does exist It was wonderful to read about WSB finding saving grace through his love of his cats and incidentally I read this book just after our beloved 25 year old cat Miichan passed away Just like Burroughs cat Fletch, Miichan seemed fine but then was suddenlygone Her presence still fills the house but the empty spaces, like Burroughs describes, where she used to be make me so sad whenever I see them and re remember that she has gone Therefore as you can imagine, I connected with this book on a very deep and emotional level Knowing and reading about someone who went through a similar experience helped us somehow with the pain and sorrow you are left with when a pet dies.Burroughs has reinterpreted the whole journals genre here Even right at the end of his life he was still pushing boundaries in his relentless and brave pursuit of being true to himself and his art WSB is sorely missed I highly recommend this for anyone interested in WSB, the beats or creative people in general

  5. Kanske Svartfors Kanske Svartfors says:

    Love What is it Most natural painkiller what there is W.S.BThese were the last words in his diary He meant love that he felt for his cats, love that could from time to time ease the fact of never ending, perpetual conflict and struggle that is life existence without no permanent satori or solution love as painkiller numbs the pain but wears off thus, the analogy for a medicine I have always liked the quote but the context pondered me I was not disappointed.About the book It is a d Love What is it Most natural painkiller what there is W.S.BThese were the last words in his diary He meant love that he felt for his cats, love that could from time to time ease the fact of never ending, perpetual conflict and struggle that is life existence without no permanent satori or solution love as painkiller numbs the pain but wears off thus, the analogy for a medicine I have always liked the quote but the context pondered me I was not disappointed.About the book It is a diary, so I read it in the toilet in 4 months or so location of the read is not meant to belittle the author in any way I found it interesting to see what W.S.B was like to his diary s white to his pen s black His last written words they had a clear voice I got the image that W.S.B was a man to the end without disillusion of the state of reality or the capabilities of human understanding I salute

  6. Phillip Phillip says:

    currently re reading i m working on a book called an improviser s notebook, and i think i m in the final stretch, just looking for a bit of reference to remind myself the kinds of things my favorite writers think about in the journal format.i don t love this work, and ok, it was published after wsb s death, and maybe he would not have wanted them published from the late writings that are short and journal ish in nature THE CAT INSIDE, and the book of dreams , this is maybe the weakest in term currently re reading i m working on a book called an improviser s notebook, and i think i m in the final stretch, just looking for a bit of reference to remind myself the kinds of things my favorite writers think about in the journal format.i don t love this work, and ok, it was published after wsb s death, and maybe he would not have wanted them published from the late writings that are short and journal ish in nature THE CAT INSIDE, and the book of dreams , this is maybe the weakest in terms of a work of literature as a autobiographical slice of burroughs, it has farvalue, but isn t actually as informative as LITERARY OUTLAW or the other biographies so

  7. Michael Michael says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here Yes, it is good Burroughs is my favorite writer, for better or worse, because he has so much to teach There are limits, to be sure, but I keep finding thoughts on interest in his work For example, in this book, I was surprised to learn that he detested abortion and believed in God well, I sort of knew the latter He eloquently fuses fiction, dreams, straight journaling, cut up by way of simply repeating himself, all while approaching his last words July 30, 1997 His last entry is so amaz Yes, it is good Burroughs is my favorite writer, for better or worse, because he has so much to teach There are limits, to be sure, but I keep finding thoughts on interest in his work For example, in this book, I was surprised to learn that he detested abortion and believed in God well, I sort of knew the latter He eloquently fuses fiction, dreams, straight journaling, cut up by way of simply repeating himself, all while approaching his last words July 30, 1997 His last entry is so amazing for a career drug addict, homosexual, and murderer One would not expect, especially anyone in the straight crowd In yer face Evidently he had a brush with day a few days before the end and ripped out what was to be his last words at the point He was really trying for a quiet but grandiose finish I respect that A noble death, if there is such a thing This book wraps up a life of letters that I continue to value and honor

  8. Svetlana Zakharova Svetlana Zakharova says:

    , , , ,it doesn t come any, , , ,it doesn t come any , , ,, Love What is It Most natural painkiller what there is.LOVE

  9. Stephanie Orban Stephanie Orban says:

    A book best read after learning all that one can learn about William S Burroughs, only to realize that even the most notorious can still offer you an unique view into the last days of his life In particular, his heartache involving Allen Ginsberg s is very touching, as well as his love for his numerous cats.

  10. Michelle Michelle says:

    So the creepy old misogynist did have a heart It was a privilege to read the words of a 20th century elder so close to their natural death for it to be Burroughs Digging The Greys thoughts on dissent right til the end Such tender words on the spaces left behind by one s pets after death Much of it no idea but for momentary flashes of audacity that moved me So the creepy old misogynist did have a heart It was a privilege to read the words of a 20th century elder so close to their natural death for it to be Burroughs Digging The Greys thoughts on dissent right til the end Such tender words on the spaces left behind by one s pets after death Much of it no idea but for momentary flashes of audacity that moved me

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