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The Avenger ❰Epub❯ ❧ The Avenger Author Matthew Baugh – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk The first new Avenger novel in 40 years The crime fighter with the moldable facethe avatar of vengeancethe combination of the Shadow and Doc Savage is back His name is Sun Koh He claims to be the last The first new Avenger novel in years The crime fighter with the moldable facethe avatar of vengeancethe combination of the Shadow and Doc Savage is back His name is Sun Koh He claims to be the last survivor of Atlantis and he may be the most dangerous man alive A physical and mental superman with the resources of Nazi Germany at his fingertips Sun Koh plans to recover an ancient power that could doom millions and win the war for the Third Reich Only Richard Benson and the members of Justice Inc oppose him but this time even The Avenger may have met his match This novel is a continuation of the original pulp novel “River of Ice”.

  • Paperback
  • The Avenger
  • Matthew Baugh
  • English
  • 26 May 2016

10 thoughts on “The Avenger

  1. Craig Craig says:

    The Sun King is an Avenger novel that's something of a seuel to River of Ice which originally appeared in the July 1940 issue of the titular pulp magazine though I don't believe one would have to read that story in order to enjoy this book The whole Justice Inc crew appears in this one as well as many of the trademark gimmicks and gadgets so it's a treat for long time fans There are also some nice Easter egg references to other heroes such as a wordy consultation with a certain Professor Littlejohn that I especially liked The Sun King himself is a self proclaimed AryanNazi hero so it's particularly good to have Josh and Rosabel than holding their own in this adventure not to mention Nellie than doing her part Cole Wilson also makes an appearance though he doesn't cross paths with Benson directly This one appeared seventy five years after the original but I thought Baugh did a great job of capturing the voice and tone of the original series There's a very nice cover on it too My only complaint is the publisher did a very very poor job of copy editing; some of the errors really take away from the flow Apparently The Sun King was a real well real fictional German hero of the 1930's sort of a Doc Savage figure; there's a fascinating afterword that gives the history of the character I hope Baugh continues to relate further Justice Inc adventures

  2. Sean Sean says:

    Matthew Baugh's work has always been excellent in my experience so I was thrilled when I heard that he was penning a new authorized novel featuring Paul Ernst's classic pulp hero the Avenger This book than lived up to my expectations Baugh pits Richard Henry Benson and the members of Justice Inc against the German pulp hero Sun Koh This character created by Paul Alfred Muller was a half Aryan prince of Atlantis whose exploits were published under the Nazi regime though ironically the Nazis later took issue with some aspects of the stories such as Sun Koh's Mayan ancestry and the presence of his black assistant Nimba A number of modern American authors have done their own uniue take on Sun Koh and Baugh's is one of the best The novel itself is very true to the spirit of Ernst's original pulp tales and serves as a seuel to one of those stories River of Ice Baugh also finds a way to work in an appearance by Cole Wilson a later addition to Justice Inc who had yet to be introduced at the point in the series during which this novel takes place Crossover aficionados such as myself will appreciate a number of shout outs to other works of fiction such as mentions of archaeologists named Littlejohn and Jones fans of Lester Dent and George Lucas and Steven Spielberg respectively should have no trouble recognizing those names and a number of references to fiction involving Atlantis including ones to the works of Robert E Howard and Manly Wade Wellman Matthew Baugh proved his talent at writing the Avenger in all three of Moonstone's previous anthologies of short stories featuring the character and this book further demonstrates how worthy he is to follow in Paul Ernst's footsteps

  3. C.T. Phipps C.T. Phipps says:

    Matthew Baugh The Vampire Count of Monte Cristo does it again with yet another retro Pulp tale of a fabulous hero of yesteryear this time with a twist In what is the definition of high concept he takes an American Pulp hero The Avenger and sets him against an actual Nazi pulp hero The aforementioned Sun King It's an interesting contrast as we see the kind of assumptions the Nazis had about their heroes versus the ones about an American one They're both blonde blue eyed supermen but the Avenger with a racially diverse surprising I know cast of supporting characters The thing is the Avenger treats his allies as friends and brothers as well as sisters while the Sun King acts as if they're all his servants by right The subject matter can verge on the uncomfortable because Matthew lets the villain be every bit as charismatic and powerful as he's described in the Nazi's propaganda but this only helps make the finale all the bitter It's especially appropriate also that Sun Koh is treated as a useful tool by the Nazis but not actually someone they treasure The Pulps were never embraced by the Nazis only tolerated even when they toed the line and the idea of having a genuine SupermanTM who is not the Furher and heroic albeit grossly disgusting misguided and in the service of evil means that he's ultimately a tool rather than a valuable part of the Nazi regime It helps underscore how the real life Nazis were motivated by jealousy hatred and spite even to each otherThe book is full of wry Pulp and Neo Pulp homages which should tickle fans of the genre I only regret this isn't available in Kindleyet

  4. Todd Glaeser Todd Glaeser says:

    The first of what I hope will be a continuing series of new Avenger novels I was unaware of Sun Koh the German pulp hero and would like to see at least the first of his novels in translationI do wish the book had been proofed closely The duplicated letters and misplaced punctuations was a little distracting

  5. Jeff J. Jeff J. says:

    A new authorized novel featuring pulp hero The Avenger The author does a great job of capturing the style of the classic novels even including references to earlier adventures In a brilliant move the villain was a fictional pulp hero used by Nazi Germany as a propaganda tool Recommended

  6. Michael Rhode Michael Rhode says:

    This was perfectly amenable and fairly interesting as the 'villain' was Sun Koh who was apparently Germany's pulp Doc Savage in the early 1930sI don't think it's self published but it had some editing flaws similar to those found in a such a book especially hanging uotation marks

  7. Eddie Eddie says:

    Not a reprint but new Avenger novel And it was great With so many nods I saw you Dr JonesJust a fun read

  8. Matt Matt says:

    This was a fun read

  9. C.T. Phipps C.T. Phipps says:

    Matthew Baugh The Vampire Count of Monte Cristo does it again with yet another retro Pulp tale of a fabulous hero of yesteryear this time with a twist In what is the definition of high concept he takes an American Pulp hero The Avenger and sets him against an actual Nazi pulp hero The aforementioned Sun King It's an interesting contrast as we see the kind of assumptions the Nazis had about their heroes versus the ones about an American one They're both blonde blue eyed supermen but the Avenger with a racially diverse surprising I know cast of supporting characters The thing is the Avenger treats his allies as friends and brothers as well as sisters while the Sun King acts as if they're all his servants by right The subject matter can verge on the uncomfortable because Matthew lets the villain be every bit as charismatic and powerful as he's described in the Nazi's propaganda but this only helps make the finale all the bitter It's especially appropriate also that Sun Koh is treated as a useful tool by the Nazis but not actually someone they treasure The Pulps were never embraced by the Nazis only tolerated even when they toed the line and the idea of having a genuine SupermanTM who is not the Furher and heroic albeit grossly disgusting misguided and in the service of evil means that he's ultimately a tool rather than a valuable part of the Nazi regime It helps underscore how the real life Nazis were motivated by jealousy hatred and spite even to each otherThe book is full of wry Pulp and Neo Pulp homages which should tickle fans of the genre I only regret this isn't available in Kindleyet

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