[Ebook] ➧ The Vanishing Velázquez ➦ Laura Cumming – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk

The Vanishing Velázquez From One Of The World S Most Expert Art Critics, The Incredible True Story Part Art History And Part Mystery Of A Vel Zquez Portrait That Went Missing And The Obsessed Nineteenth Century Bookseller Determined To Prove He Had Found It.When John Snare, A Nineteenth Century Provincial Bookseller, Traveled To A Liquidation Auction, He Stumbled On A Vivid Portrait Of King Charles I That Defied Any Explanation The Charles Of The Painting Was Young Too Young To Be King And Yet Also Too Young To Be Painted By The Flemish Painter To Which The Work Was Attributed Snare Had Found Something Incredible But What His Research Brought Him To Diego Velazquez, Whose Long Lost Portrait Of Prince Charles Has Eluded Art Experts For Generations Vel Zquez 1599 1660 Was The Official Painter Of The Madrid Court, During The Time The Spanish Empire Teetered On The Edge Of Collapse When Prince Charles Of England A Man Wealthy Enough To Help Turn Spain S Fortunes Ventured To The Court To Propose A Marriage With A Spanish Princess, He Allowed Just A Few Hours To Sit For His Portrait Snare Believed Only Vel Zquez Could Have Met This Challenge But In Making His Theory Public, Snare Was Ostracized, Victim To Aristocrats And Critics Who Accused Him Of Fraud, And Forced To Choose, Like Vel Zquez Himself, Between Art And Family.A Thrilling Investigation Into The Complex Meaning Of Authenticity And The Unshakable Determination That Drives Both Artists And Collectors Of Their Work, The Vanishing Vel Zquez Travels From Extravagant Spanish Courts In The 1700s To The Gritty Courtrooms And Auction Houses Of Nineteenth Century London And New York But It Is Above All A Tale Of Mystery And Detection, Of Tragic Mishaps And Mistaken Identities, Of Class, Politics, Snobbery, Crime, And Almost Farcical Accident It Is A Magnificently Crafted Page Turner, A Testimony To How And Why Great Works Of Art Can Affect Us To The Point Of Obsession.


10 thoughts on “The Vanishing Velázquez

  1. says:

    They were like guests at a surprise party waiting for your arrival and now you have entered the room their room, not the real one around you or so it mysteriously seems The whole scene twinkles with expectation That is the first sensation on the threshold of the gallery in the Prado where Las Meninas hangs that you have walked into their world and become suddenly as present to them as they are to you.And what keeps them here, what keeps them alive, or so the artist implies, is not just t They were like guests at a surprise party waiting for your arrival and now ...


  2. says:

    Two enigmatic men are the subject of this book John Snare, a bookseller and printer, is an ordinary Victorian man who in 1845 attends an inauspicious auction of artefacts from a boys school that has closed down There he sees a painting which casts a spell over him It s a portrait of King Charles I, listed in the catalogue as possibly by Van Dyck However Charles is so young in the picture that Snare believes it might be the rumoured but never seen painting by Vel zquez, executed when Charles Two enigmatic men are the subject of this book John Snare, a bookseller and printer, is an ordinary Victorian man who in 1845 attends an inauspicious auction of artefacts from a boys school that has closed down There he sees a painting which casts a spell over him It s a portrait of King Charles I, listed in the catalogue as possibly by Van Dyck However Charles is so young in the picture that Snare believes it might be the rumoured but never seen painting by Vel zquez, executed when Charles visited the Spanish court as a young prince to woo King Philip IV s daughter At this point in time virtually no one outside Spain has ever seen a Vel zquez Snare buys the painting for 8 He removes some of the grime f...


  3. says:

    There is something intensely romantic in the fact that while walking up Broadway in the midst of a busy noonday crowd made up of Bulls and Bears, rattling omnibuses, express wagons, Fifth avenue carriages, railroad ticket offices, big hotels, big coaches hurrying passengers to steam on water or land in a few moments, and by passing through a rather slim and dusty hall, you may shut yourself out from the present In this silent place may be seen a magnificent painting, a portrait of Charle There is something intensely romantic in the fact that while walking up Broadway in the midst of a busy noonday crowd made up of Bulls and Bears, rattling omnibuses, express wagons, Fifth avenue carriages, railroad ticket offices, big hotels, big coaches hurrying passengers to steam on water or land in a few moments, and by passing through a rather slim and dusty hall, you may shut yourself out from the present In this silent place may be seen a magnificent painting, a portrait of Charles I painted by the great V lazquez This is truly superb New York Times, March 1860 Laura Cumming, art critic and author of this non fiction book, saysOr rather, in the drowsy shadows of a library in winter, I came upon a curious Victorian pamphlet stitched into a leather bound miscellany between a quaint history of the Hawaiian Islands and a collection of short stories ominously titled Fact and FictionThe pamphlet had been written and ...


  4. says:

    An excellent overview of the work of Diego Velazquez and his standing among the Old Masters It s also the story of one man transfixed to the point of monomania by one of Velazquez s works, John Snare, a 19th century bookseller and collector Highly recommended.


  5. says:

    BOTWhttp www.bbc.co.uk programmes b06x8vq2Description Laura Cumming charts the obsession of a 19th century Reading bookseller with a portrait of Charles I painted when the Monarch was a young man on a visit to Madrid The Spanish genius Velasquez painted very few pictures, so did John Snare discover a long lost treasure And if so, where is it now This is a story about the intense emotions that great art can provoke passions that sometimes verge on the irrational and which transcend consi BOTWhttp www.bbc.co.uk programmes b06x8vq2Description Laura Cumming charts the obsession of a 19th century Reading bookseller with a portrait of Charles I painted when the Monarch was a young man on a visit to Madrid The Spanish genius Velasquez painted very few pictures, so did John Snare discover a long lost treasure And if so, where is it now This is a story about the intense emotions that great art can provoke passions that sometimes verge on the irrational and which transcend considerations of value John Snare s conviction about the painting he bought evolved into a dispute with those who hadmoney, power and influence In a sense, the missing Velasquez became a battleground for class war and the individual against the establishment But at the heart of the story lies a work of art, created with such skill and delicacy that it inspired the fiercest of feelings and co...


  6. says:

    An obsession with a work of art led to the ruin of a British man, John Snare In 1845, Snare purchased an old painting at an auction He thought it might be a painting of Charles I, painted by Velazquez when the future English king visited Madrid In this true story, author Laura Cumming tells about Snare s infatuation and eventual financial ruin He lost his bookstore and print shop, left his family, and devoted his life to researching and showing the painting The book also discusses Velazqu...


  7. says:

    In 1845, a humble bookseller named John Snare bought a painting at an auction, which was listed as being probably a Van Dyck but which he was convinced was a Velazquez This book tells the story of how that purchase took over Snare s life, not always for the better Along the way, Cumming writes a good deal about Velazquez s life and especially his art It is a very interesting story but where the book excels, for me, are the passages where Cumming writes about Velazquez s paintings She write In 1845, a humble bookseller named John Snare bought a painting at an auction, which was listed as being probably a Van Dyck but which he was convinced was a Velazquez This book...


  8. says:

    From BBC Radio 4 Book of the Week Laura Cumming charts the obsession of a 19th century Reading bookseller with a portrait of Charles I painted when the Monarch was a young man on a visit to Madrid The Spanish genius Velasquez painted very few pictures, so did John Snare discover a long lost treasure And if so, where is it now Episode 2 The portrait is set before the public and the press in the spring of 1847 Snare is determined that his discovery should be recognised as a work by the grea From BBC Radio 4 Book of the Week Laura Cumming charts the obsession of a 19th century Reading bookseller with a portrait of Charles I painted when the Monarch was a young man on a visit to Madrid The Spanish genius Velasquez painted very few pictures, so did John Snare discover a long lost treasure And if so, where is it now Episode 2 The portrait is set before the public and the press in the spring of 1847 Snare is determined that his discovery should be recognised as a work by the great Spanish court painter, but not everybody is willing to agree with him.Episode 3 The Lost Velasquez is put on show in Edinburgh at the beginning of 1849 But soon Snare finds himself having to fend off not just challenges over the portrait s authenticity,but also overownership.Episode 4 The Velasquez has ...


  9. says:

    I love Velasquez and I like true detective stories but, for me, this book has been a bit overhyped The basic problem is that, despite all the research Laura Cumming has done, ultimately there is very little known about Velasquez life and background A masterful painter he may have been but as a personality he s no Carravagio or Van Gogh Likewise, John Snare, the Reading bookseller, who becomes obsessed with the portrait of the young Charles 1 that he believes to be by Velasquez is als...


  10. says:

    This is by far the strangest book I have ever read The tenses switch randomly from past to present and back again The writing style is almost mystical the descriptions of the art reverential Most odd is the elu...