The Silo Effect: The Peril of Expertise and the Promise of

The Silo Effect: The Peril of Expertise and the Promise of Breaking Down Barriers [PDF / Epub] ✅ The Silo Effect: The Peril of Expertise and the Promise of Breaking Down Barriers By Gillian Tett – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Award winning journalist Gillian Tett applies her anthropologist s lens to the problem of why so many organizations still suffer from a failure to communicate It s a profound idea, richly analyzed The Award winning journalist Gillian Tett Effect: The Epub Ü applies her anthropologist s lens to the problem of why so The Silo PDF \ many organizations still suffer from a failure to communicate It s a profound idea, richly analyzed The Silo Effect: The PDF/EPUB ¾ Wall Street Journal , about how our tendency to create functional departments silos hinders our work The Silo Effect asks a basic question why do humans working in modern institutions collectively act in ways that sometimes seem stupid Why do normally clever people fail to see risks and opportunities that later seem blindingly obvious Why, as Daniel Kahnemann, the psychologist put it, are we sometimes so blind to our own blindness Gillian Tett, a first rate journalist and a good storyteller The New York Times , answers these questions by plumbing her background as an anthropologist and her experience reporting on the financial crisis inIn The Silo Effect, she shares eight different tales of the silo syndrome, spanning Bloomberg s City Hall in New York, the Bank of England in London, Cleveland Clinic hospital in Ohio, UBS bank in Switzerland, Facebook in San Francisco, Sony in Tokyo, the BlueMountain hedge fund, and the Chicago police Some of these narratives illustrate how foolishly people can behave when they are mastered by silos Others, however, show how institutions and individuals can master their silos instead Highly intelligent, enjoyable, and enlivened by a string of vivid case studies The Silo Effect is also genuinely important, because Tett s prescription for curing the pathological silo isation of business and government is refreshingly unorthodox and, in my view, convincing Financial Times This is an enjoyable call to action for better integration within organizations Publishers Weekly.


10 thoughts on “The Silo Effect: The Peril of Expertise and the Promise of Breaking Down Barriers

  1. ☘Misericordia☘ ~ The Serendipity Aegis ~ ⚡ϟ⚡ϟ⚡⛈ ✺❂❤❣ ☘Misericordia☘ ~ The Serendipity Aegis ~ ⚡ϟ⚡ϟ⚡⛈ ✺❂❤❣ says:

    Fucking brilliant We are so clever these days that we are goingstupid by the second We are so deeply thinking that we can t think about things slightly to the side of our daily experience Our expertise is so advanced it s going to be useless real soon if it isn t already Love it


  2. Jane Walker Jane Walker says:

    A bit disappointing There isn t enough material here for a book, and it reads at times as if she is trying to stretch it out as much as possible And like many books today it could have done with proof reading.


  3. Matt Papes Matt Papes says:

    I was watching a recent episode of Charlie Rose and Gillian Tett was one of his guests she was quite impressive She had just completed The Silo Effect and when I heard that title and got a sense of how smart she was from the show I simply had to buy it And I am so glad I did The book is so relevant and I highly recommend it, especially to my Microsoft friends While we all know silos are a problem and lead Steve Ballmer to start a One Microsoft initiative prior to his retiremet, it is ano I was watching a recent episode of Charlie Rose and Gillian Tett was one of his guests she was quite impressive She had just completed The Silo Effect and when I heard that title and got a sense of how smart she was from the show I simply had to buy it And I am so glad I did The book is so relevant and I highly recommend it, especially to my Microsoft friends While we all know silos are a problem and lead Steve Ballmer to start a One Microsoft initiative prior to his retiremet, it is another thing entirely to really go deep into the problem and come up with ideas and actions to overcome them With the eye, of all things, an anthropologist, she has chapters on companies that failed because of silos and chapters on companies that have had success overcoming them such as Facebook There is no magic bullet to overcoming silos but I think reading this book and adopting the mindset it promotes will serve you well in your career


  4. Courtney Courtney says:

    I am ALL ABOUT this book Gillian Tett applies anthropological theory and perspectives to organizational culture in a provocative and engaging manner The Silo Effect examines how personal and institutional outlooks are impacted by identity constructs, competitive culture, information technology, and spatial design architecture Tett clearly illustrates how easily the flow of information can be hampered by superficial variables and how profound the ramifications can be The case studies Tett e I am ALL ABOUT this book Gillian Tett applies anthropological theory and perspectives to organizational culture in a provocative and engaging manner The Silo Effect examines how personal and institutional outlooks are impacted by identity constructs, competitive culture, information technology, and spatial design architecture Tett clearly illustrates how easily the flow of information can be hampered by superficial variables and how profound the ramifications can be The case studies Tett examines depict a wide range of organizations, such as banks, police departments, hospitals, and tech companies, and the composite portrait of institutional culture underscores the value of information and its timely coherent dissemination and interpretation As someone working towards a degree in information science and technology, these patterns really resonate with me I started reading a library copy of this book Then, about half way through, I ordered myself a copy, because I knew it would become indispensable for my personal and professional development The Silo Effect, Monoculture, Why Societies Need Dissent, and The Ghost Map are on my personal shelf of game changing non fiction


  5. Darren Darren says:

    Sharing is good, hoarding is bad that is the slightly oversimplified takeaway from this book when it concerns corporate behaviour and internal operations Far too many companies are creating departments or silos empires within an empire and forgetting to share and cooperate with each other.It can be very frustrating, even internally, when you can t get the real level of collegiate cooperation and information flow from someone allegedly on the same side, possibly even sitting in the same ope Sharing is good, hoarding is bad that is the slightly oversimplified takeaway from this book when it concerns corporate behaviour and internal operations Far too many companies are creating departments or silos empires within an empire and forgetting to share and cooperate with each other.It can be very frustrating, even internally, when you can t get the real level of collegiate cooperation and information flow from someone allegedly on the same side, possibly even sitting in the same open plan office Even functional departments can tend to man the barricades and adopt an isolationist policy the less functional departments and boy can there be many of them are even worse This book takes a look at how and why we, as leaders, managers or workers in a company, can naturally gravitate to create these silos and looks at the benefits many companies have achieved by breaking down the internal walls within.It was an interesting combination of the author s background as an anthropologist and journalist at the Financial Times, which included extensive reporting on the 2008 financial crisis It is not a dry book and the reader is taken on a whirlwind tour around the world, looking at places such as the Bank of England, City Hall in New York and Cleveland Clinic in Ohio and examines how these institutions suffered from the silo effect and slowly discovered their hammers to start breaking them down Sometimes a silo can be a powerful thing to have, yet the secret is identifying when this is apposite and how to best utilise it With this book as your guide, you may be significantly better informed as a result.You don t have to have any real interest in business to enjoy this book It is also an engaging read to the curious, generalist reader and naturally those in business stand to gain a lot if they are prepared to open their eyes and minds There is so much potential, whether it is discovering how to better organise working environments and teams or the bigger picture of a true, connected global enterprise There is likely to be something for everybody.There is a fair bit of history and scene setting that could be a turn off for the impatient sort of reader, although it does not feel like unnecessary padding or imbecilic background material in any case Reading about the trials and tribulations of Sony and their product teams who didn t seemingly communicate and then launched products that would cannibalise each other just made you want to groan out loud Then you laugh out loud to discover how their new western president sought to break down silos and the word is apparently unknown in Japanese, so in desperation, a translator turned the phrase into takotsubo or octopus pot Yet this was a good description as Japanese octopus pots are narrow containers that are easy for an octopus to slide into, but almost impossible to exit describing many processes at the company yet Sony staff had never heard the word takotsubo used to describe their company and many wondered whether this was some kind of clever British joke So all in all, an interesting and engaging book It does not offer a step by step guide to resolving a possible problem, yet it does make you aware of the possible issues that can be lurking within your company and gives you the ability to consider steps to better manage it.Autamme.com


  6. Martin Smith Martin Smith says:

    Tett s writing is brisk and trenchant Her anthropological roots show and help as she makes a compelling case business entropy happens As we scale businesses or brands, we tend to isolate left hand from right The tendency is so pervasive and worrying several startups Facebook is one example she uses fight to keep teams small, innovative and hungry How they combat the inevitable siloing of teams, content and meaning was interesting and felt RIGHT I ve worked in large firms and siloing was Tett s writing is brisk and trenchant Her anthropological roots show and help as she makes a compelling case business entropy happens As we scale businesses or brands, we tend to isolate left hand from right The tendency is so pervasive and worrying several startups Facebook is one example she uses fight to keep teams small, innovative and hungry How they combat the inevitable siloing of teams, content and meaning was interesting and felt RIGHT I ve worked in large firms and siloing was a real problem Putting ideas, content or even friends into silos isn t limited to big companies either Today I saw new work from a favorite Chapel Hill artist Patrick Dougherty wraps willow strands into stunning, temporary, and beautiful sculptures Patrick s sculptures feel like the embodiment of the immunology and genetic engineering the University of North Carolina is creating to cure cancer Why not ask Patrick to build a sculpture for UNC s Lineberger Cancer Center I wondered Willows wrapped into sweeping lines and engaging sculpture to look like what immunology is at least to a non researcher or doctor Why not get out of the box and show people i.e donors what UNC is doing via Patrick s art I thought over breakfast Since I jumped several paradigms I m betting there will be a Greek Chorus of Can t Do It police at UNC, but, as Tett points out, our futures and our ability to cure cancer is wound up like a willow in paradigm jumping Cross your fingers and I m in for a few thousand to my Tech Cures Cancer Fund if UNC uses the idea


  7. Dean Dean says:

    Of the nine chapters I found only three compelling The rest were too anecdotal for me I was expecting muchon the anthropology and sociology of silos Too loose Not tight enough on the original thesis Readlike nine newspaper articles and less as a cohesive book.


  8. John Cumming John Cumming says:

    A great book, if a bit focussed on silos in the financial world It s frightening how, even as experts, our classification of the world around us can cause a blindness to both risks and opportunities as the boundaries become rigid and impenetrable The book highlights how looking through the anthropologist s lens may help us spot where we are becoming blind creatures of habit and help us jump the boundaries between the silos we create that carry so much risk.


  9. Sumit Gouthaman Sumit Gouthaman says:

    Short and concise Learnt a lot from the book.This book is neatly divided into 2 parts the first 3 chapters contains stories about how internal Silos at 3 organizations lead to negative consequences The second part includes 3 examples of how individuals and organizations managed to break silos and reap rewards.Each story in the book is centered around a few chosen individuals This keeps the stories engaging.This is a must read book for anyone interested in understanding how a company s cultur Short and concise Learnt a lot from the book.This book is neatly divided into 2 parts the first 3 chapters contains stories about how internal Silos at 3 organizations lead to negative consequences The second part includes 3 examples of how individuals and organizations managed to break silos and reap rewards.Each story in the book is centered around a few chosen individuals This keeps the stories engaging.This is a must read book for anyone interested in understanding how a company s culture can make or break it s fortunes


  10. John John says:

    Brilliant, insightful, provocative, Gillian Tett has written an essential read Her book about credit derivatives, Fool s Gold, was epic, but this book turns conventional business practices upside down Silos are great if you are storing grain but not if you want to build a prosperous, sustainable business Gillian is a trained anthropologist with an advanced degree She manages to slip in relevant examples that highlight the topic Tribalism, turf battles, intramurals, civil wars, insurrections Brilliant, insightful, provocative, Gillian Tett has written an essential read Her book about credit derivatives, Fool s Gold, was epic, but this book turns conventional business practices upside down Silos are great if you are storing grain but not if you want to build a prosperous, sustainable business Gillian is a trained anthropologist with an advanced degree She manages to slip in relevant examples that highlight the topic Tribalism, turf battles, intramurals, civil wars, insurrections, CYA, corporate politics whatever you call it, it s a cancer Gillian deftly writes the obits on companies who failed to get this and shares best practices from others that survived and prospered Definitely worth a look


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