Ustav timukas : elu ja surm, au ja häbi tormilisel 16.


Ustav timukas : elu ja surm, au ja häbi tormilisel 16. sajandil [Read] ➬ Ustav timukas : elu ja surm, au ja häbi tormilisel 16. sajandil Author Joel F. Harrington – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Ajaloolase Joel F Harringtoni Ustav timukas Elu ja surm, au ja h bi tormilisel sajandil jutustab lugejale erakordse loo renessansiaegsest N rnbergi timukast Frantz Schmidtist tema enda kirja pandud p Ajaloolase Joel F Harringtoni Ustav : elu PDF ´ timukas Elu ja surm, au ja h bi tormiliselsajandil jutustab lugejale erakordse loo renessansiaegsest N rnbergi timukast Frantz Schmidtist tema enda kirja Ustav timukas Kindle - pandud p eviku kaudu Autor on selle haruldase ajalooallika p hjal kirjutanud p neva ja kaasahaarava raamatu, mis juhatab meid teekonnale l bi timuka Frantz Schmidti elu ning timukas : elu Epub Ü annab lisaks v rvika pildi varauusaegse hiskonna igap evaelust ja vaimsetest hoiakutestN rnberg olisajandil ks Euroopa poliitiliselt ja majanduslikult v imsamaid paiku, sealsed pangad ja kaubandusettev tted v istlesid Firenze Medicite ja Augsburgi Fuggeritega Frantz Schmidti eluaeg langes enam v hem t pselt kokku N rnbergi rikkuse ja m juv imu haripunktiga P evaraamatut pidas meister Frantz Schmidt terveltaasta jooksul, alates oma esimesest hukkamisest, mille ta pani toimeaastasenaaastal timuka ametiks oli ta hakanud valmistuma jubaaastaselt , kuni ametist lahkumiseniaastal Selle aja jooksul tappis ta isiklikultinimest ning piitsutas v i andis muul viisil ihunuhtlust veel sadadele s dim istetutele K ik hukkamised ja muud karistused t hendas ta isiklikku p evikusse hoolikalt les ning lisas neile ka selgitusi ja kommentaare Peale selle tegutses meister Franz ravitseja ja meedikusena timukad olid tol ajal ravijatena k rgelt hinnatud, sest nad olid tuttavad inimkeha anatoomia ja eriti igat sorti haavadega, lisaks oli neil ligip s sjalahkunute kehale, millel arvati olevat terve rida raviomadusiM istagi ei kuulunud timukas sel ajal lugupeetud linnakodanike hulka Tegemist oli kardetud ja p latud ametiga, mille esindajaid hiskonnas t rjuti Frantz Schmidt ei sattunud niisugusesse ametisse kaugeltki vabal tahtel, k ll aga t itis ta oma kohustusi au ja v rikusega Harrington n itab lugejale oma raamatu kangelast kui vaga, vooruslikku ja rangete p him tetega inimest, kelle saatuseks oli olla hiskonnast v lja t ugatud, kuid kes tundis kaasa ohvritele ja oli p hendunud hiskondliku korra jalule seadmisele.

    Ustav timukas : elu ja surm, au ja häbi tormilisel 16. istlesid Firenze Medicite ja Augsburgi Fuggeritega Frantz Schmidti eluaeg langes enam v hem t pselt kokku N rnbergi rikkuse ja m juv imu haripunktiga P evaraamatut pidas meister Frantz Schmidt terveltaasta jooksul, alates oma esimesest hukkamisest, mille ta pani toimeaastasenaaastal timuka ametiks oli ta hakanud valmistuma jubaaastaselt , kuni ametist lahkumiseniaastal Selle aja jooksul tappis ta isiklikultinimest ning piitsutas v i andis muul viisil ihunuhtlust veel sadadele s dim istetutele K ik hukkamised ja muud karistused t hendas ta isiklikku p evikusse hoolikalt les ning lisas neile ka selgitusi ja kommentaare Peale selle tegutses meister Franz ravitseja ja meedikusena timukad olid tol ajal ravijatena k rgelt hinnatud, sest nad olid tuttavad inimkeha anatoomia ja eriti igat sorti haavadega, lisaks oli neil ligip s sjalahkunute kehale, millel arvati olevat terve rida raviomadusiM istagi ei kuulunud timukas sel ajal lugupeetud linnakodanike hulka Tegemist oli kardetud ja p latud ametiga, mille esindajaid hiskonnas t rjuti Frantz Schmidt ei sattunud niisugusesse ametisse kaugeltki vabal tahtel, k ll aga t itis ta oma kohustusi au ja v rikusega Harrington n itab lugejale oma raamatu kangelast kui vaga, vooruslikku ja rangete p him tetega inimest, kelle saatuseks oli olla hiskonnast v lja t ugatud, kuid kes tundis kaasa ohvritele ja oli p hendunud hiskondliku korra jalule seadmisele."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 334 pages
  • Ustav timukas : elu ja surm, au ja häbi tormilisel 16. sajandil
  • Joel F. Harrington
  • Estonian
  • 10 June 2017

About the Author: Joel F. Harrington

Is a well known author, : elu PDF ´ some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Ustav timukas : elu ja surm, au ja häbi tormilisel Ustav timukas Kindle - sajandil book, this is one of the most wanted Joel F Harrington author readers around the world.



10 thoughts on “Ustav timukas : elu ja surm, au ja häbi tormilisel 16. sajandil

  1. Clif Hostetler Clif Hostetler says:

    This nonfiction history provides a uniquely detailed description of life in Reformation era Europe as revealed by the personal diary of Meister Franz Schmidt who worked as a professional executioner from 1573 to 1618 During the final forty years of this career he held the official position of Executioner for the German city of Nuremberg It appears that his written record of executions and torture was begun during the first five years covered by the journal as a resum to support his applicatio This nonfiction history provides a uniquely detailed description of life in Reformation era Europe as revealed by the personal diary of Meister Franz Schmidt who worked as a professional executioner from 1573 to 1618 During the final forty years of this career he held the official position of Executioner for the German city of Nuremberg It appears that his written record of executions and torture was begun during the first five years covered by the journal as a resum to support his application for the full time salaried position at Nuremberg The diary was continued from that point through the end of his career as a supporting document to his application for a declaration of respectability from the Holy Roman Emperor which was made six years after his retirement from work.One of the reasons I was interested in this book was to see if perhaps Franz Schmidt may have executed one of my anabaptist ancestors As it turns out the word anabaptist is not mentioned in the book Most of the turmoil of the early Reformation years took place during the first half of the sixteenth century, and things had settled down by Franz Schmidt s time Nuremberg was a Lutheran City within the Holy Roman Empire that was mostly Catholic, but their relationship seemed peaceful Executed prisoners could choose between the Lutheran or Catholic final rites The first half of the Thirty Years War occurred elsewhere, and by the time the war came to Nuremberg, Franz Schmidt was no longer living.It so happens that many executions of witches were taking place throughout Europe during this era Fortunately, Nuremberg was resistant to this particular craze One incident recounted in this book was of a man who showed up in town spreading rumors of witchcraft Nuremberg city official ended up executing the accuser for disruption of the peace In another case the person making accusations was banned from the city Many of the crimes being punished were related to theft and robbery For minor crimes it appears that the first sentence was stocks, whipping, or banishment a.k.a forced to leave town When faced with a case of multiple repeat offenses the city didn t have facilities for long term incarceration, so execution was about the only practical option available Also, torture to force a confession seems to be the usual procedure used Franz Schmidt did make some comments regarding cases of false accusations, but never questioned the technique of using torture to obtain confessions.During his career he averaged about one execution per month, a torture session per week, and probably daily consultations on matters of health, healing, and wounds His involvement with the healing arts may seem counter intuitive to people of today, but during his time he probably knewabout the human body than almost anybody else in the city It is known from his journal that he sold cadavers to physicians for dissection and on several occasions performed the dissections himself It was also part of the executioner s official responsibilities to mend and heal the effects of his torture prior to execution Frantz Schmidt s profession was deemed dishonorable in the class conscious society of the time However, it was very important that he not be tainted by association with the criminal element of the time which left him somewhat isolated socially Nevertheless, it was important for him that he be recognized for his competence and dependability in spite of this isolation One way he broadcast his professional demeanor and separation from the riffraff was to refrain from alcohol Thus Frantz did not make any great social sacrifice when he came to what was a remarkable decision for a man of his era never to drink wine, beer, or alcohol of any kind It was a vow he apparently kept for the rest of his life and for which he eventually became widely known and admired Frantz s religious beliefs may have played a role in this choice, but complete abstention from alcohol was rare in the sixteenth century, even among the most godly men and women Our modern in clination might be to speculate that he had suffered from the embar rassing behavior or drunken violence of someone close to him perhaps even his own father But whatever his religious or emotional reasons, Schmidt s vow not to drink was also a carefully calculated career deci sion Early modern Europeans considered it a given that the execu tioner would drink to excess a stereo type with a great deal of truth behind it Compelled to kill and torture their fellow human beings again and again, many in Frantz s profession likely sought preexecution courage in a tankard or two of beer or oblivion after the fact in a large quantity of wine By publicly refuting the legendary fondness of his fel low executioners for the bottle, Frantz found an extraordinary means of underscoring the sobriety, both literal and figurative, of the way he had chosen to live This jujitsu maneuver cleverly took the disadvantage of his de facto social isolation and turned it into a virtue that distinguish him in the eyes of future employers and perhaps even society at large The quiet journeyman who sat without companions or drink in a far corner of the tavern may have been lonely but he knew exactly what he was doing I learned about this book from the following short review that was in the PageADay Book Lover s Calendar for 5 14 2015 In the late 1500s, a public executioner in Nuremberg, Germany, began keeping a journal During his 45 years in the profession, he executed 394 people and tortured hundredsHistorian Joel F Harrington uses the diaries as a way to explore Frantz Schmidt s life, revealing aspects of his medical practice, his marriage, and his growing sense that his day job did not line up with his religious beliefs This unusual biography is also a portrait of Europe in the period when it still had one foot in the Dark AgesTHE FAITHFUL EXECUTIONER LIFE AND DEATH, HONOR AND SHAME IN THE TURBULENT SIXTEENTH CENTURY,by Joel F Harrington Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2013 The following is a link to an example of an executioner of that era with the job of killing of 88 people in one day books

  2. Susan Susan says:

    This is the fascinating story of Meister Frantz Schmidt 1555 1634 who was an executioner and torturer in Nuremberg and who kept a diary, which the author has fleshed out into an incredible biography of a man and a time which is little known It was unusual to keep a diary in those times, but Schmidt kept a personal journal of the executions he carried out throughout his long career, from 1573 at the age of just nineteen, to his retirement in 1618.One of the oddest, and saddest, things about This is the fascinating story of Meister Frantz Schmidt 1555 1634 who was an executioner and torturer in Nuremberg and who kept a diary, which the author has fleshed out into an incredible biography of a man and a time which is little known It was unusual to keep a diary in those times, but Schmidt kept a personal journal of the executions he carried out throughout his long career, from 1573 at the age of just nineteen, to his retirement in 1618.One of the oddest, and saddest, things about Schmidt s life is that he became an executioner through a quirk of fate when his father, Heinrich, was called upon by a noble to act as executioner after he had arrested three locals for plotting against his life Up to that point, Heinrich had been a woodsman and fowler After the hapless man was forced to kill he had no choice but to become an executioner Since the Middle Ages, executioners were shunned and excluded by society and tended to bond together out of necessity When this terrible social exclusion was forced upon him, Heinrich did the best he could and trained his son Frantz in his new profession although both men had plans to try to escape the calling forced upon them.It has to be said that Frantz did the best he could under the circumstances His training began with using rhubarb stalks to practice on apparently similar to the sinews in the neck much of this book is gruesome, so this is not for the squemish , continuing with beheading stray dogs and helping his father in his work before, ahem, striking out on his own During his long career, he personally killed three hundred and ninety four people, torturing countless others For this was a time of violence, when the executioner had to administer justice for the community, both to avenge the victims and end the threat posed by dangerous criminals as well as setting an example of what could happen if crimes were committed.Frantz, in fact, lived in the golden age of the executioner , when it was decided to prosecute criminalseffectively and full time experts were needed in this reform of criminal justice Professional executioners were seen as part of this reform Although many of the crimes discussed in this book seem to be treated harshly, and the stories of torture are often troubling to read, there is also a great deal of compassion and good sense Although this was a time when superstition was rife and women often accused of witchcraft, the area where Frantz worked seemed to have fairly enlightened views about such things Often Frantz seems troubled by violence against children thieves often chopped off babies hands, using them as candles and good luck charms and also made disparaging comments about prisoners who refused to act in a solemn or repentent way at their executions Although most prisoners seemed to try to make some kind of religious peace at the end of their life, some refused to cooperate understandably and other treated events with levity one proclaiming that the priests words gave him, a headache and apparently dying with a smirk on his face Other attempts to leave corpses on the gallows as a warning was not treated with the respect those in authority expected one thief was stripped to his stockings, causing a surge of curious onlookers, including cheeky females , which caused the executioner to be ordered to make him respectable again.This is a really interesting read and the author has done a great job of taking a journal with little that is personal and recreating the life of Frantz Schmidt We hear of his success, his tragedies, the sudden onset of plague in the community, the way crimes were viewed and dealt with and read, with interest, whether he ever managed to escape the fate thrust upon his family and find social acceptance Highly recommended

  3. Aaron Kent Aaron Kent says:

    This one is currently holding the title of best book I have read in 2013 It tells the story of a 16th century executioner, through the critical study of a journal he kept through out the course of his career Although it isn t a journal in our modern sense of the word, it nevertheless informs this utterly engrossing look at medieval society in 16th century Nuremburg It s a real eye opener and refutes a lot of non academic preconceptions I think the majority of us have concerning the middle a This one is currently holding the title of best book I have read in 2013 It tells the story of a 16th century executioner, through the critical study of a journal he kept through out the course of his career Although it isn t a journal in our modern sense of the word, it nevertheless informs this utterly engrossing look at medieval society in 16th century Nuremburg It s a real eye opener and refutes a lot of non academic preconceptions I think the majority of us have concerning the middle ages, capital punishment and the caricature of the executioner we all take for granted Instead, Harrington presents a moving and intimate portrait of an individual tasked with the brutal job of meting out justice in the form of floggings, decapitations, breaking on the wheel, garoting and the like This isn t a book for the sqeamish, but even during the worst descriptions of the crimes perpetrated, or the graphic executions that followed, you get a real sense of the humanity of all involved This isn t a one dimensional rendering of an ogre in a black mask with an axe Frantz Schmidt, our Faithful Executioner is presented in deservedly clear light

  4. Emily Emily says:

    The chief storyline of this book concerns Meister Frantz Schmidt s efforts to restore his family name Schmidt s father, a respectable woodsman, had the misfortune to be standing around when a despised local noble required someone to dispatch some supposed would be assassins, on the spot The father was permanently tainted by this killing, leaving him and his son no choice but to become professional executioners Frantz spends his entire unusually long life trying to revive his family s good n The chief storyline of this book concerns Meister Frantz Schmidt s efforts to restore his family name Schmidt s father, a respectable woodsman, had the misfortune to be standing around when a despised local noble required someone to dispatch some supposed would be assassins, on the spot The father was permanently tainted by this killing, leaving him and his son no choice but to become professional executioners Frantz spends his entire unusually long life trying to revive his family s good name through careful strategy and unfailing probity and piousness Reading this, you feel lucky to live in a modern society where you can t incur lifelong untouchability through the whim of a social superior Frantz s carefulness and thoughtfulness also make him surprisingly sympathetic for a guy who personally killed nearly 400 people and tortured or maimed manyNo other livelihood was open to him, so he tried to be good at his unwanted profession.I hadn t previously thought much about this, but early modern jurisdictions didn t imprison people for long periods of time they simply jailed them until they were dealt with, by execution, flogging or some kind of punitive mutilation, or exile Because the punishments were a one time deal, they tended to beextreme, with executions being handed down for property crimes or for repeated minor crimes, simply because that was the only way to permanently deal with a criminal However, you don t walk away from this book thinking that we by which I mean Americans are much smarter than these early modern people in terms of devising punishments that are coherent or give the desired results In fact, reading about how the city councilors get frustrated with recidivists and order the execution of teenagers, you re reminded how frequently teenagers get charged as adults in our society, just because someone thought them especially bad.I read this book because I m interested in 16th century Nuremberg, not because I m interested in crime and punishment, and on that front the arrangement of the material is a little disappointing Harrington follows the chronology of Schmidt s journal and the progress of his quest for social rehabilitation, which is quite interesting but perhaps does not warrant 250 pages Meanwhile, you get glimpses of late 16th to early 17th century life throughout ridiculous nicknames of career criminals, tiffs between master and servant, unruly teens, the fashion for earth apples globes , recurrent outbreaks of plague, etc but these take a backseat to Schmidt s career Harrington is so successful at bringing his narrow topic to life that I wish he d highlighted and interpretedof the details he encountered along the way As it is, this seems to occupy an uncomfortable middle ground between academic history reflected by the author s meticulousness and contextualization and popular history reflected by its focus on one person s biography and inspiring personal story I d recommend it if you re interested in the period or in law and order

  5. Oleksandr Zholud Oleksandr Zholud says:

    This book is based chiefly on the diary of Nuremberg executioner Frantz Schmidt, who worked in this capacity for the city from 1588 to 1617 It also uses other contemporary sources to depict not only a life of the protagonist, but the picture of late medieval Europe.While there are some gruesome details of the trade, they aren t the point The executioner himself says almost nothing about the executions and nothing at all about tortures, which he had to perform.There are several works of fiction This book is based chiefly on the diary of Nuremberg executioner Frantz Schmidt, who worked in this capacity for the city from 1588 to 1617 It also uses other contemporary sources to depict not only a life of the protagonist, but the picture of late medieval Europe.While there are some gruesome details of the trade, they aren t the point The executioner himself says almost nothing about the executions and nothing at all about tortures, which he had to perform.There are several works of fiction that attempt to look in the executioner s mind, to show either his cruelty, oroften his dignity in performing the necessary albeit unpleasant job Not in this case Frantz disliked the job, orprecisely the low status associated with it hangmen had to live outside the city, they weren t allowed to enter a church, could be stoned to death by a mob, etc He became the executioner because his father was pressed into the job and all other trades were closed for him Therefore, his lifetime goal was to save his children from the similar fate.One of thesurprising discoveries for me was that he also worked as a healer, which makes sense if you this about it the knowledge of anatomy and healing external wounds are essential for a torturer The number of his patients was around 15000, which it muchthan 394 persons he executed.A great window into the late medieval Europe

  6. Rick Skwiot Rick Skwiot says:

    Although not recommended for the faint of heart, this book gives muchthan graphic and gruesome accounts of 16th century German crime and criminal justice the latter with sanctioned torture to elicit confessions, burning witches alive, and other forms of painful punishment and death Underscoring how painful and frightening were some execution methods, are accounts of prisoners throwing themselves down before the court and kissing the judges hands in gratitude for commuting their sente Although not recommended for the faint of heart, this book gives muchthan graphic and gruesome accounts of 16th century German crime and criminal justice the latter with sanctioned torture to elicit confessions, burning witches alive, and other forms of painful punishment and death Underscoring how painful and frightening were some execution methods, are accounts of prisoners throwing themselves down before the court and kissing the judges hands in gratitude for commuting their sentence to mere beheading Historian Joel Harrington mines the journal of Nuremberg executioner Frantz Schmidt and other contemporary sources to paint a convincing portrait of the social class restraints, religious imperatives, superstitions, political realities, epidemics, and medical practices of a distant time and place though in some ways revealing how little we have changed

  7. Darren Anderson Darren Anderson says:

    Excellent book For the most part, he presents a fair narrative without imposing modern ideas of morality He places a lot of the practices of the day in a context that creates sympathy rather than disgust.

  8. Trevor Kew Trevor Kew says:

    Quite a unique read, this historical account of this infamous profession focuses on the life of one particular 16th century individual, Frantz Schmidt, based on the diary he kept overthan 40 years as Nuremberg s executioner Harrington is to be commended for the way he has approached this subject The temptation to sensationalise aspects the book must have been quite strong instead, he combines some truly revolting details with the mundane reality of what was, after all, a job I also a Quite a unique read, this historical account of this infamous profession focuses on the life of one particular 16th century individual, Frantz Schmidt, based on the diary he kept overthan 40 years as Nuremberg s executioner Harrington is to be commended for the way he has approached this subject The temptation to sensationalise aspects the book must have been quite strong instead, he combines some truly revolting details with the mundane reality of what was, after all, a job I also appreciated how clearly Schmidt s life and profession and indeed the death penalty itself were contextualised, as well What I found most surprising was that executioners tended to be relatively wealthy, but were still considered untouchables by their society Paradoxically, the fact that many of them were also healers is fascinating as well, though given their familiarity with anatomy ahem , there isof a logical connection than might be thought This book is well worth a read for anyone interested in medieval history told on both a personal and societal level Highly recommended

  9. Jill Jill says:

    I m a crime fanatic so this book was right up my alley It is a non fiction work based on the diary of an actual executioner in Germany in the late 1500 s The book delved into an executioner s place in his world well paid but ostracized by greater society In addition to executing 300 people during his tenure, Frantz Schmidt also acted as the town doctor, married and raised children There is of course much time spent on execution methods at the time and various other physical punishments Ho I m a crime fanatic so this book was right up my alley It is a non fiction work based on the diary of an actual executioner in Germany in the late 1500 s The book delved into an executioner s place in his world well paid but ostracized by greater society In addition to executing 300 people during his tenure, Frantz Schmidt also acted as the town doctor, married and raised children There is of course much time spent on execution methods at the time and various other physical punishments However, the existence of the journal allows the author to share the thoughts, feelings and personal history from Schmidt which gives the book a very personal feel

  10. wally wally says:

    the faithful executioner life and death, honor and shame in the turbulent sixteenth century, kindlethat is not among the list here at goodreads2013, joel f harringtoni think i saw a question related to this in the big quiz and so here i am.read the introduction by harringtonand the only exception i take to that intro is his characterization of the man as killer professional killers like frantz schmidt have long been fearedcatch a glimpse of the inner life of this professional to the faithful executioner life and death, honor and shame in the turbulent sixteenth century, kindlethat is not among the list here at goodreads2013, joel f harringtoni think i saw a question related to this in the big quiz and so here i am.read the introduction by harringtonand the only exception i take to that intro is his characterization of the man as killer professional killers like frantz schmidt have long been fearedcatch a glimpse of the inner life of this professional torturer and killerlet alone a career killer from a distant time and place i ll hazard that harrington is opposed to the death penalty and that that stance is apparent throughout this historical narrative.the introduction has some curiosity, as it describes an execution, a public burningfor counterfeiting till then, i had the cartoon image of the stubbled man w a black kerchief tied low, a big blade, so forth so on there is a drawing of frantz in the introhis back to usa sword in his hands.tooexecutions were civic eventsnot hidden away behind thick walls during the dark of night.today, i read monthly in a magazine i subscribe to about honest citizens, violated by repeat offenders, their list of felonies as long as their victims arms, made to become executioners in their own homes, due to societies failure to punish the offender we ve come so far those events rarely make prime timeunless there s an agenda under our white hispanic sun.anywayonward upward.moving right along, update, 3 aug 13, 7 48 p.m e.s.t.yeah okay then honorthis idea presented in the introduction, makes me wonder what role it played in the justice system is there honor among thievesnot the kind of honor that cliche brings to my mindbut how did honor play in torture i get the idea that torture was not the prevailing method herebut torture was an option honor among men must have played a part.so anywaythe intro also tells the reader how this came to bethat there was actually an original journal, one that had been edited and changed a bit, and that this original hadinformation than the journal entriesalthough even so, this is not a confessional by the executionerthere is no right wrong commentary on what transpiredsimply the facts, ma amso and so executed botched, the few times it tookthan one swing to execute the condemned.tooi wondered about rates, what w our penchant for polls, numbers, the big advertising companies the establishment media always on us about numbers billie is doing better in school because he eats kellogg s corn flakes but so far, there is little to nothing about crime rates that sort of thing.although here at the 25% mark on the kindle, there is noted the change in numbers less executions for theftthis that the other there is has been a sprinkling of cases from the record, both recalcitrant poor sinners and those who repented.tooi considered The Gunslinger from the author of horror himself, Stephen King, and the public execution portrayed thereintame, by comparison to some of the brutal public humiliations recorded herein perhaps that saysabout us and how we have come to view executionsas does king s other story on the matter, The Green Mile, wherein an innocent man spends time on the milein the death house.i ve read a few othersThe Innocent Man Murder and Injustice in a Small Town by John GrishamThe Executioner s Song by Norman Mailerthose i recallthere might be others.but tooalthough grisham s storydon t recall if that was fact or fictionmailer s story is historical fictionbut all of them glorify the condemnedin king s mile, it makes for great theatrebut in this one herethe end forthan a few is given in brief or the variations, sorrow repentancedrunken follythat is part and parcel of the process today, it is by invite only, and the public can only presume to know the process or the condemned s state of mind in king s mile, paul knowingly and willingly goes through w an execution although he knows the process has been botched by a member of the team that failing on his part is seldom, if ever, spoken about when praise is heaped on king and his storytherethe focus is an innocent man, and rightfully sobut in this one here, botched executions were at times met by public stonings of the executioner archers at one of frantz s executions protected him from an irate public.ummmm laterupdate, finished, 4 aug 13, sunday afternoon, 4 24 p.m e.s.t.good read a brief look into life of the late 16th, early 17th centuriesin part through the equally as brief journal entries of an executioner who spent most of his working life in nuremburg.an outsider there he came from another town he persevered eventually he became a citizen of that citythe description of which is mind boggling a castle w walls a couple hundred feet high, the centerpiece of the townalthough when he first moved there, he was not in Nor was his profession, as executoralthough people also went to them for healing.ummmmso this harrington guy remain relatively outside the game kinda somewhat and not too he is opposed to capital punishmenta small matter in this bookonly a part of a larger wholebut when he writes about how the executioner might view our time, or how we might be looking at that timeit would have surprised the executioner who so closely identified with the victims of crime to hear his society characterized as especially cruel and heartless once he learned of such unthinkable modern atrocities as genocide, atomic obliteration, and total war he would admit that the criminal justice of his day could be harsh, but he would recoil at the notion of trials and incarcerations that extended for years, even decades, sometimes involving long periods of isolation.to that i would add the executioner would be astounded at the sheer numbers of human life aborted before birth, that he d turn his back on this generation, ashamed to have witnessed what we proclaim to be progress the executioner s blade metthan a few who practiced infanticide during his timeas well asthan a few truly evil men who cut babies out of the wombs of women they had murdered today the same practice is sanctioned by bioethics.the book touches on how people of the time placed shackles and hurdles around their fellow man talking regulation or requests to authorities for action so and so is working, is taking work away from mehinder them touches on guilds and the likealthough it wasn t the guild who enforced a code for their tradebut other authoritieswhich is so much like what i face today, unelected and unaccountable government bureaucrats making and enforcing law , adjudicating that same law or less having all three powers of government in their hands.yadda yaddatootouches on some beliefs of the timeabout what could be done w the human bodyparts we re talking here blood ghoulish, really use your imagination.but for the numbersthis executioner guy had a lot of free time on his handsnumbers againbut between that and torture they wanted to solve crime and did what they couldcheck it outinformative and so forth

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