The Tao of Deception: Unorthodox Warfare in Historic and


The Tao of Deception: Unorthodox Warfare in Historic and Modern China ❴Read❵ ➳ The Tao of Deception: Unorthodox Warfare in Historic and Modern China Author Ralph D. Sawyer – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk The history of China is a history of warfare Wars have caused dynasties to collapse fractured the thin fasade of national unity and brought decades of alien occupation But throughout Chinese history i The history of China is of Deception: PDF/EPUB ✓ a history of warfare Wars have caused dynasties to collapse fractured the thin fasade of national unity and brought decades of alien occupation But throughout Chinese history its warfare has been guided by principles different from those that governed Europe Chinese strategists followed the concept first articulated by Sun tzu in The Art of War of i ch'i or unorthodox warfare The concept of i involves The Tao Epub / creating tactical imbalances in order to achieve victory against even vastly superior forces Ralph D Sawyer translator of The Art of War and one of America's preeminent experts on Chinese military tactics here offers a comprehensive guide to the ancient practice of unorthodox warfare He describes among many other tactics how Chinese generals have used false rumors to exploit opposing generals' distrust of their subordinates; dressed thousands of women as soldiers to Tao of Deception: PDF/EPUB ¿ create the illusion of an elite attack force; and sent word of a false surrender to lure enemy troops away from a vital escape route The Tao of Deception is the book that military tacticians and military historians will turn to as the definitive guide to a new yet ancient way of thinking about strategy.


4 thoughts on “The Tao of Deception: Unorthodox Warfare in Historic and Modern China

  1. Kevin O& Kevin O& says:

    A very large book that could be reduced by 85%An exampleExploiting Han's submissiveness Ch'in later mounted a three pronged attack against Wei's capital of Ta liang under Wei Jan who served as commander in chief Pai Ch'i who directed the southern component initiated the campaign in 276 by uickly seizing several border towns prompting Chao to forcibly annex a few for self preservation The next year Wei Jan advanced with the Central Army and defeated a Han counter attack in which he inflicted 40000 casualties and another Wei force before capturing other cities en route to Ta liang The year after Ch'i belatedly dispatched a rescue force that fared little better as the conjoined forces from Ch'i and Wei were defeated by Wei Jan north of Ta liang suffering another 40000 casualties Chao finally interceded by striking Wei Jan's forces encamped at Hua yang a year later Ch'in responded by having their armies deployed in the north and the south converge and crush the armies of Chao and Wei reportedly slaying some 130000 troops Pai Ch'i also pursued Wei's remnants to the Yellow River where another 20000 perished mostly from drowning Wei was forced to ceded additional territory to surviveThe book is supposed to be a history of the development Chinese strategy and tactics supposedly centered around a very wonderful special concept called ch'i on which the author spends the first chapter defining We in the west understand this as the rather commonplace use of the unexpected in warfare or surpriseThe rest of the book at least as far as I could force myself to read is worse with entire chapters full of one damned thing after another as in the paragraph above Oh and then the actual point the was slowly getting to in that paragraph was elucidated by a two page uote from someone else Of what use then is the author if all that's needed is to dump big piles of undifferentiated factoids and uotes That's just laziness Go ghost write for Bill OReilly


  2. Robert Robert says:

    bit of a mixed bag LOTS of info but narratives of campaign after campaign across all centuries with little helpful context or extended commentary get tedious uickly


  3. Taylor Ellwood Taylor Ellwood says:

    The Tao of Deception is a history of unorthodox warfare in China The author provides a variety of historical examples from different periods of unorthodox tactics as well as explaining how unorthodox warfare evolved Probably the only complain I have is that he didn't focus much on Twentieth Century China and its approach to unorthodox warfare but that may simply be due to lack of materials This book has some valuable insights to offer not just in terms of unorthodox warfare but also how such ideas can be applied to business both in terms of being aware of your strengths and weaknesses and in applying such tactics when dealing with competitors It's a long read but well worth it for a variety of reasons


  4. Micah Micah says:

    Just got it as a present for fathers day More soon


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *