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Mara's Stories Glimmers in the Darkness ➹ [Reading] ➻ Mara's Stories Glimmers in the Darkness By Gary D. Schmidt ➮ – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk A testament to the power of stories and how they may bring hope even in times of darkness Everyone gathers around and from her lips to their ears the stories go and for a little while the camp disappe Glimmers in Kindle × A testament to the power of stories and how they may bring hope even in times of darkness Everyone gathers around and from her lips to their ears the stories Mara's Stories PDF or go and for a little while the camp disappears and for a little while they are all freeAs night falls the women gather their children to listen to Mara tell her Stories Glimmers in Epub Û stories They are stories of light and hope and freedom stories of despair and stories of miracles stories of expected pain and stories of unexpected joy all told in the darkness of the concentration camp barracks Through extensive research noted in the back of the book Gary Schmidt has skillfully woven together stories from such sources as the Jewish religious scholar Martin Buber Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel; and folklorists Steve Zeitlin and Yaffa EliachCombining lore of the past with tales born in the concentration camps Mara's stories speak to us from a time that must never be forgotten.


10 thoughts on “Mara's Stories Glimmers in the Darkness

  1. Philip Philip says:

    A phalanx of guards poised behind it their faces showing nothing their stone hands holding machine guns They had seen the ritual of this division a thousand times One yawned widely as Herr Shaul shuffled toward themAre the demons in hell bored? Herr Shaul wondered This is definitely the darkest YA or possibly even MG book I have ever read But it is also a compelling book that deals with an important subject Some of the stories are better than others and a few were so obscure as to just what their point was that I began to wonder if you had to be Jewish yourself to really appreciate them all But then the excellent final chapter on Notes to the Stories which I almost skipped goes a long way towards explaining the background and meaning to each one of Schmidt's tales very helpful


  2. KrisTina KrisTina says:

    Part of my read three books by the same author challenge of the year This is one of Schmidt's less known works a compilation of short stories told by Mara while living as a prisoner in Auschwitz As you can imagine it's heart breaking I didn't love it as far as short stories go but I am glad I read it It's different than most of Schmidt's books and even though it's short stories I wanted a continuous thread to pull throughout the stories it just wasn't there


  3. Joe Joe says:

    I liked this collection of stories and the thread that connect them Almost as interesting was the appendix which told where the stories came from historically For anyone who enjoys reading about the Holocaust I believe you need to add this collection if you haven't already done so


  4. Michelle Michelle says:

    This short story collection is hard hitting and thought provoking Some dark some hopeful worth the read and a good complement to other WW2 reading


  5. Ryne Ryne says:

    Note Spoilers aheadCATEGORY SATISFIED Gary D SchmidtPlot summary Every night the women prisoners in the concentration camp come together to hear Mara tell stories Mara was the daughter of a Rabbi and each night she masterfully retells old Jewish fables in the context of the joys and horrors that Jews experienced living in Nazi Germany and in the concentration camps actually in terms of plot that's about it Mara is basically the only real character in this novel and even she's not really developed that much What this book is really about is the stories that Mara tells and here the novel shines through The stories are all beautifully told and beautifully simple as the best fables are Most of them tugged at my heartstrings and some of them left me with feelings of warmth and wonderI did have a little bit of a hard time suspending my disbelief at Mara's extensive knowledge however for being a young woman who probably wouldn't have traveled very extensively if at all she knows all about Germany and Poland and even vividly describes the English Channel She knows about all of the horrible ways that Jews have been killed in different Nazi concentration camps I found this extensive knowledge to be slightly hard to believe though I'll admit that the latter knowledge—about the concentration camps—is probable I haven't read any first hand accounts of concentration camp survivors so I'm not sure how much they generally knew about the ways people were killed there I guess it's hard to deposit an entire culture's repository of experience into the mind of one teenagerBut don't get me wrong I loved loved loved this book All of the fables were so well told and just amazing My only regret is that the book ended so abruptly with the last story which was uite different from the rest and in my opinion not as amazing as the other ones even though the book asserts otherwise The book provides an emotional insight into both Jewish culture the way of life for Jews in Nazi Germany and of course the scary realities of life and death in the concentration camps I recommend this book to everyone everywhere The language might be a little too elevated for some middle schoolers since it's poetic but I say why not give it a try? Readers in their early teens and up should definitely see what Mara's Stories has to teach them


  6. Melanie Forbush Melanie Forbush says:

    Gary Schmidt combines his deep love for relating history with his talent for telling stories He creates Mara a name meaning bitter in Hebrew bitter for the bitterest experiences she must go through as a concentration camp Holocaust prisoner during World War II Mara has a gift for storytelling sharing stories to the other prisoners at night after they return from tiresome chores These Hasidic tales that her Rabbi father taught her are the very elements these prisoners need to find hope and joy in the very barracks that seeks to make their lives miserable Each tale she tells celebrates the very beauty and strength the world has to offer I find this novel a refreshing interpretation of what could have happened in German concentration camps during World War II We often hear from history books the horrible events that took place but we never hear how the prisoners kept the faith Schmidt dares to guess what one Jew might have done for Mara is a one person representing the six million people that were murdered by Adolf Hitler My favorite stories that she tells are the ones about death but Schmidt formulates the death as a liberation from the evil that detains them on Earth I really enjoy to learn about the Jewish perspective on life through the points of view and jargon portrayed by the characters in these stories most revolving around Rabbis and their disciples What better way to celebrate the legacy these courageous martyrs left behind? I would recommend this book to Social Studies students between the ages of 12 14 who enjoy a hopeful and upbeat fictional outlook on Holocaust history


  7. Linda Lipko Linda Lipko says:

    It is not surprising that I rate this book so highly given the fact that Gary Schmidt's books The Wednesday Wars and Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy were two of my top reads in 2009Once again Schmidt wove magic with his astute understanding of human nature and his fantastic writing ability that hooks you in and keeps you riveted from the first to the last pageUsing Rabbinical stories tellings of Hasidic traditions folktales and actual recollections from the concentrations camps Schmidt uses the voice of young Mara who from the cold fearful barracks weaves stories at night to bring a glimmer to the darkness of the horror all aroundWhile not an easy book to read it is indeed a subject that needs to be told again and again Schmidt's delivery packs a breathtaking punch while also astounding the reader with stories of hope and the depth of faith and fortitude of six million Jews who died at the hands of an evil powerWhen I finished the book I once again marveled at the strength not only of those who perished but of those who survive and know the depth and resiliency of a wonderful faith with the supreme understanding that love is indeed the highest powerOf interest is the back of the book which contains the actual resources Schmidt chose to use as a reference for Mara's stories


  8. Christy Christy says:

    A testament to the power of stories and how they may bring hope even in times of darknessEveryone gathers around and from her lips to their ears the stories go and for a little while the camp disappears and for a little while they are all freeAs night falls the women gather their children to listen to Mara tell her stories They are stories of light and hope and f A testament to the power of stories and how they may bring hope even in times of darknessEveryone gathers around and from her lips to their ears the stories go and for a little while the camp disappears and for a little while they are all freeAs night falls the women gather their children to listen to Mara tell her stories They are stories of light and hope and freedom stories of despair and stories of miracles stories of expected pain and stories of unexpected joy all told in the darkness of the concentration camp barracks Through extensive research noted in the back of the book Gary Schmidt has skillfully woven together stories from such sources as the Jewish religious scholar Martin Buber Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel; and folklorists Steve Zeitlin and Yaffa EliachCombining lore of the past with tales born in the concentration camps Mara's stories speak to us from a time that must never be forgotten


  9. Stephanie Stephanie says:

    I feel like I had to give this book three stars as if giving it less would show disrespect for my ancestors who were in the concentration camps during the Holocaust This book was interesting There was a brief description of Mara at the beginning of each section followed by short stories of tales of how Jews outsmarted the Nazis or how God helped them to outsmart or escape the Nazis I have always had an issue reading short stories I never feel like I gain anything from reading them They are over too uickly before I can start to understand the characters and so I feel as if the lesson isn't developed as much as it could have been I realize that story telling like this happened in the concentration camps but I wonder if they really told stories of Jews outsmarting the Nazis It would help lift their spirits for a bit but isn't it a bit sacrilegious to spread false stories like that? I suppose I would recommend this book to a young adult who needed or wanted to read about the Holocaust although I personally think The Diary of Anne Frank and The Hiding Place are much better stories about the HolocaustWarningsLanguage I can't remember anyViolence concentration camps gas showersSex noneDrugsAlcohol wine


  10. Katie Katie says:

    This book was utterly beautiful I think as I was reading this there were two options in which I was contemplating that happen after a tramatic event Either people will group together often making them stronger because they have to rely on each other or a tramatic even will break people apart It's as if the strain of a tramatic event is too much for one to take and; therefore they push people away In this beautiful collection of short stories I saw both instances In the very first short story of the book The Violinist I am sure that by the act of one person giving his life up so that the violinist could live the violinist was overcome with pure joy and love These short stories that depict so many different views from the time of the Holocaust are very touching and I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to read something truly magnificant Ratings are from 1 10Violence7 I only say this because the book is a bunch of short stories from the Holocaust There are short stories that mention the gas chambers death and shootings Sexual Content0 NoneLanguage2 I don't remember any specific bad language just the fact that there is a downgrading of Jews and could be seen as offensive in some ways DrugsAlcohol0 None


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