The Choice: Embrace the Possible Epub Ü Choice:

The Choice: Embrace the Possible ❮PDF / Epub❯ ☂ The Choice: Embrace the Possible ✎ Author Edith Eger – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk It s and sixteen year old ballerina and gymnast Edith Eger is sent to Auschwitz Separated from her parents on arrival, she endures unimaginable experiences, including being made to dance for the infa It sand sixteen Embrace the PDF/EPUB ¾ year old ballerina and gymnast Edith Eger is sent to Auschwitz Separated from her parents on arrival, she endures unimaginable experiences, including being made to dance for the infamous Josef Mengele When the camp is finally liberated, she is pulled from a pile of bodies, barely aliveThe horrors of the Holocaust didn t break Edith In fact, they helped her learn to live again with a life affirming strength and a truly remarkable resilience The Choice is her unforgettable story.


About the Author: Edith Eger

Is a well Embrace the PDF/EPUB ¾ known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Choice: Embrace the Possible book, this is one of the most wanted Edith Eger author readers around the world.



10 thoughts on “The Choice: Embrace the Possible

  1. Maureen Maureen says:

    4.5 STARS Please try to remember that what they believe, as well as what they do and cause you to endure does not testify to your inferiority but to their inhumanity James Baldwin, The Fire Next TimeI could never find the right words and phrases to describe what a moving yet uplifting memoir this is Edith Eger was just 16 years old in 1944 when she entered the gates of hell Auschwitz Her grandparents and mother and father were sent to the gas chamber under the direct orders of the inf 4.5 STARS Please try to remember that what they believe, as well as what they do and cause you to endure does not testify to your inferiority but to their inhumanity James Baldwin, The Fire Next TimeI could never find the right words and phrases to describe what a moving yet uplifting memoir this is Edith Eger was just 16 years old in 1944 when she entered the gates of hell Auschwitz Her grandparents and mother and father were sent to the gas chamber under the direct orders of the infamous Josef Mengele Under those same orders she was made to dance for Mengele Although she was terrified, she managed to take her mind back to the outside world, back to when she used to give ballet performances for appreciative audiences At the end of her performance for Mengele she was thrown a small loaf of bread and though grateful that she had the extra food to share with her sister Magda and others, she was also relieved that he hadn t bestowed the same fate on her as her beloved family members I won t go into anydetail, but Edith shares her experiences in Auschwitz , and when liberation finally came, she was discovered among a pile of bodies barely alive.Man s inhumanity to man never fails to shock me The ones who were fortunate enough to survive the death camps, didn t just need medical intervention for their extreme malnutrition and other physical problems, butimportantly it was the huge psychological scars that would prove the most difficult to heal.Edith went on to become an eminent psychologist, someone who helped people come to terms with the traumas in their lives, and she shares many of those cases with us but she also needed to exorcise the ghosts of her own past too I found when I was reading this book, that an involuntary sob would sometimes appear out of nowhere It was excruciating to read at times, and yet I couldn t put it down Desmond Tutu said that this book would leave you forever changed I m inclined to agree Thank you Edith for sharing your courageous and inspiring life story, it s not something I will forget any time soon.Thank you so Netgalley and Penguin Random House UK Ebury Publishing for my Arc I have given an honest unbiased review in exchange


  2. Elyse Walters Elyse Walters says:

    Time doesn t heal It s what you do with time Healing is possible when we choose to take responsibility, when we choose to take risks, and finally, when we choose to release the wound, to let go of the past or the grief The above excerpt is true but that doesn t mean it s easy or can be achieved by waving a magic wand or positive thinking it alone We d only be fooling ourselves It sinvolved than simply stating a mantra But I m getting ahead of myself The most important thi Time doesn t heal It s what you do with time Healing is possible when we choose to take responsibility, when we choose to take risks, and finally, when we choose to release the wound, to let go of the past or the grief The above excerpt is true but that doesn t mean it s easy or can be achieved by waving a magic wand or positive thinking it alone We d only be fooling ourselves It sinvolved than simply stating a mantra But I m getting ahead of myself The most important thing I can share is how extraordinary this memoiris From start to finish it s PIERCING.ASTONISHING..GUT WRENCHINGEYE OPENING about experiences of the Holocaust no matter how many books you ve read on this topic.Edith also gives us a very close look at what follows at the end of imprisonment, the end of the war Something will feel new about The Holocaust as if reading it for the very first time I didn t know who this 90 year old author was until yesterday but her name Edith Eva Eger is a mainstay solid name in my heart mind now Can you image writing your first and only book at age 90 If yes wonderful This woman had a story to tell I ve read several memoirs about the Holocaust written by survivors whom I can never forget their name The CHOICE , by Edith Eva Eger is a mind boggling memoir incredibly affecting I ll remember her name And I can t recommend this book highly enough When Edith was first released from the warshe said many thingsHere are a couple of things she said I AM FREE I AM FREE but now I have no voice Forthan a year I have not had the luxury to think about what hurts or doesn t hurt I have been able to think only about how to keep up with others, how to stay one step ahead, to get a little food here, to walk fast enough, to never stop, to stay alive, to not be left behind Now that the danger is gone, the pain within and the suffering around me turn awareness into hallucination A silent movie A march of skeletons Most of us are too physically ruined to walk We lie on carts, we lean on sticks Our uniforms are filthy and worn, so ragged and tattered that they hardly cover our skin Our skin hardly covers our bones We are an anatomy lesson Elbows, knees, ankles, cheeks, knuckles, ribs jut out like questions What are we now Our bones look obscene, our eyes are caverns, Blue black finger nails We are trauma in motion Edith was born in 1927 She died in 1978 She competed in the Olympic Games as a Hungarian swimmer in 1964 She was also training for the Olympic team for gymnastics before she was kicked off the team for being Jewish soon after her family was sent to the camps She was 17 at the time The story you ll read in this book deals with a dark, difficult, and important subject Edith brings forth a profound human quality relative to today Edith married, came over to the United States, had three children, learned English, got a degree, a PhD, taught history in Texas She later became a psychologist helping others overcome traumas


  3. Louise Wilson Louise Wilson says:

    Dr Edith Eva Eger is an eminent psychologist whose own experiences as a Holocaust survivor helps her treat patients and allows them to escape the prisons of their own minds.Edith Eger was just sixteen when the Nazis came to her hometown of Hungry and took the Jewish family to an interment centre and then to Auschwitz Her parents were then sent to the gas chamber by Joseph Menele Edith was demanded by Menele to waltz The Blue Danube just a few hours after her parents were murdered Menele rew Dr Edith Eva Eger is an eminent psychologist whose own experiences as a Holocaust survivor helps her treat patients and allows them to escape the prisons of their own minds.Edith Eger was just sixteen when the Nazis came to her hometown of Hungry and took the Jewish family to an interment centre and then to Auschwitz Her parents were then sent to the gas chamber by Joseph Menele Edith was demanded by Menele to waltz The Blue Danube just a few hours after her parents were murdered Menele rewarded Edith with a small loaf of bread of which she shared with her fellow prisoners.This is a beautifully written and very moving memoir It has been divided into four sections Prison, Escape, Freedom and Healing How these people who suffered so much, could heal and then go on to make something of their lives like Edith has, beggars belief This is one very committed woman, who became a therapist, who truly understands people s pain and forgives uniquely This is not something I would normally read, but I m really glad that I did I highly recommend this book.I would like to thank NetGalley, Penguin Random House UK, Ebury Publishing and the author Edith Eger for my ARC in exchange for an honest review


  4. Dem Dem says:

    Edith Eger s determination and courage to survive against the odds make this a heart breaking but powerful and inspiring read This is what reading is all about for me, and I am grateful to Edith Eger who generously takes her readers on a journey that is harrowing but so inspirational and motivating I have read so many concentration camp survivor s stories over the years and each and every one of those books have taught me something new and that is the reason I keep reading and learning and r Edith Eger s determination and courage to survive against the odds make this a heart breaking but powerful and inspiring read This is what reading is all about for me, and I am grateful to Edith Eger who generously takes her readers on a journey that is harrowing but so inspirational and motivating I have read so many concentration camp survivor s stories over the years and each and every one of those books have taught me something new and that is the reason I keep reading and learning and remembering this time in our world s ugly history Edith s story is so well written and her strength and courage give this book an uplifting feel We experience through words on a page her unthinkable experiences in Nazi concentration camps and how she survived and went on to become a therapist and helped others recover from all kinds of hardship and experiences Her remarkable ability to forgive and heal while helping others in her work is a lesson to us all.In 1944, sixteen year old ballerina Edith Eger was sent to Auschwitz Separated from her parents on arrival, she endures unimaginable experiences, including being made to dance for the infamous Josef Mengele When the camp is finally liberated, she is pulled from a pile of bodies, barely alive.I loved several quotes in this book and a couple that really stood out for me are.I remind myself that each of us has an Adolf Hitler and a Corrie Ten Boom within us We have the capacity to hate and the capacity to love The Piano that lived against the wall under her portrait is gone The piano was so present in our daily lives that it was almost invisible, like breath Now its absence dominates the roomI am so glad I finally had an opportunity to read this inspiring account and another book for my favorites shelf


  5. Karen Karen says:

    This is the memoir of Dr Edith Eger, age 90an internationally acclaimed psychologist and one of the few remaining Holocaust survivors At the age of sixteen, along with her parents and sister Magda, was sent to Auschwitz.Edie and Magda survived multiple death camps, and Edie was found barely alive in a pile of corpses when American Troops liberated the camps in 1945.Such an extraordinary book on survival and stories of how she has helped others to heal by confronting their suffering and maki This is the memoir of Dr Edith Eger, age 90an internationally acclaimed psychologist and one of the few remaining Holocaust survivors At the age of sixteen, along with her parents and sister Magda, was sent to Auschwitz.Edie and Magda survived multiple death camps, and Edie was found barely alive in a pile of corpses when American Troops liberated the camps in 1945.Such an extraordinary book on survival and stories of how she has helped others to heal by confronting their suffering and making the choice to heal.It took me a long time to read this because I was going online and looking up so many places and people,not that I needed to but I was just so interested since this was a true story Dr Edith Eger is AMAZING


  6. Kathleen Kathleen says:

    This is a beautiful, absolutely pitch perfect memoir by Dr Edith Eger I was not familiar with Dr Eger prior to reading this, and I am grateful to her for sharing her story The book is organized into four sections Prison, Escape, Freedom, and Healing I would describe it as three parts memoir, one part therapy It would be enough, simply for nanogeneraian Dr Eger to tell us her story and share the important events she witnessed in her lifetime But she is not satisfied to make this book onl This is a beautiful, absolutely pitch perfect memoir by Dr Edith Eger I was not familiar with Dr Eger prior to reading this, and I am grateful to her for sharing her story The book is organized into four sections Prison, Escape, Freedom, and Healing I would describe it as three parts memoir, one part therapy It would be enough, simply for nanogeneraian Dr Eger to tell us her story and share the important events she witnessed in her lifetime But she is not satisfied to make this book only about her experience She is clearly a committed therapist who understands pain and forgiveness uniquely, and has a very powerful message that to truly live a full life, we need to make the choice not only to forgive, but to forgive ourselves.I describe the book as pitch perfect because from the introduction, Dr Eger explains that there is no heirarchy when it comes to suffering She does not tell her story so that the reader will minimize their own suffering in comparison, that would just be another way of judging ourselves As a therapist, she understands that someone whose suffering may seem superficial to others, is generally attributed to something muchdeeply rooted, and representative of a much larger pain I find it extraordinary that she is capable of empathizing with others to this extent When you read her story, and I hope you do, you will understand the extent of her personal suffering Not only what she endured in her youth, but as an adult coming to terms with everything she lost, and finding a way to let it be her strength, instead of imagining what her life would have been had it not been interrupted by the cruelty and injustice of the Holocaust I can not find the words to describe the depth of her compassion Life is about choices, and I am guilty of the destructive thinking that Dr Eger drescribes in the book In my Midewestern upbringing, I was raised to take responsibility for my choices I pride myself in this responsibility What this book has made me realize that often in my experience, this has been a punishing idea there are choices, and there are consequences But life is not that simple, there are choices andchoices Often we choose to punish ourselves In doing so, we are imprisoning ourselves with our own beliefs of not feeling worthy, a fear of making a bad choice The author is open about choices she made in her own life, and that they may not have been the best ones Everyone suffers Everyone has endured the consequences of their own poor choices But to live our best life, we must continue to make choices, instead of allowing ourselves to be imprisoned by our past Thank you, Dr Edith Eva Eger for sharing your story and your wisdom Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with an advance copy of The Choice for review


  7. Paul Lockman Paul Lockman says:

    5 starsAbsorbing Brilliant A truly inspirational read.What a woman Edith Eger is now 90 years old and has given the world this outstanding memoir of her survival in Auschwitz as a teenager and then her life after WWII when she and her husband emigrated to America and all the while describing how she has dealt with being a survivor and her path to self acceptance, self fulfilment and inner peace The book cover has a quote from Desmond Tutu, A gift to humanity One of those rare and eternal s 5 starsAbsorbing Brilliant A truly inspirational read.What a woman Edith Eger is now 90 years old and has given the world this outstanding memoir of her survival in Auschwitz as a teenager and then her life after WWII when she and her husband emigrated to America and all the while describing how she has dealt with being a survivor and her path to self acceptance, self fulfilment and inner peace The book cover has a quote from Desmond Tutu, A gift to humanity One of those rare and eternal stories that leave you forever changed It s hard to disagree with that sentiment.What makes it such a great book A few reasons for me first and foremost, it s a remarkable story of survival in itself I felt the timeframes of the book were just right with the first third of the book devoted to her time in the infamous concentration camp and the remaining two thirds devoted to the rest of her life I really liked the fact that a considerable amount was written about the few months just after the war ended and the adjustment to freedom and the brand new life Edith was facing in the late 1940s and early 1950s, which is something you don t often find with books written by holocaust survivors Also, the writing is free flowing, engaging and very high quality It s a real page turner For me, probably the main thing that makes it so memorable is that Edith went onto to become a registered clinical psychologist and she offers such raw and honest insights into the human condition, how she coped with such a traumatic experience and what gives our lives meaning I felt the balance in describing her own psyche and healing and the examples she gave of the many clients she has helped was just right too.Very early on we get some insights into Edith s firm belief about the power of the mind and our thinking and how she wants us to view her experience as a survivorWhy do we so often struggle to feel alive, or distance ourselves from feeling life fully Why is it such a challenge to bring life to life If you asked me for the most common diagnosis among the people I treat, I wouldn t say depression or post traumatic stress disorder, although these conditions are all too common among those I ve known, loved, and guided to freedom No, I would say hunger We are hungry We are hungry for approval, attention, affection We are hungry for the freedom to embrace life and to really know and be ourselves.We become victims not because of what happens to us but when we choose to hold onto our victimization We develop a victim s mind a way of thinking and being that is rigid, blaming, pessimistic, stuck in the past, unforgiving, punitive, and without healthy limits or boundaries We become our own jailors when we choose the confines of the victim s mind.I also want to say there is no hierarchy of suffering There s nothing that makes my pain worse or better than yours, no graph on which we can plot the relative importance of one sorrow versus another People say to me Things in my life are pretty hard right now, but I have no right to complain it s not Auschwitz This kind of comparison can lead us to minimize or diminish our own suffering Being a survivor, being a thriver requires absolute acceptance of what was and what is ..I don t want you to hear my story and say, My own suffering is less significant I want you to hear my story and say, If she can do it, then so can I Edith talks us through some of the big names in psychology and psychotherapy that she gravitated towards, e.g Rogers, Ellis, Seligman, and she came up with her own version of therapy that she labelled Choice Therapy, as freedom is about choosing compassion, humour, optimism, intuition, curiosity, and self expression And to be free is to live in the present There was also a heart breaking choice that Edith had to make standing in line at Auschwitz but I won t put in a spoiler describing what that choice was.Nearing the end of the book it s 2010 and Edith has been invited to address an army unit returning from combat in Afghanistan to talk about her experience of trauma and how she coped and survived She gets a little nervous stepping up to the podium but then reminds herself. I was there to share the most important truth I know, that the biggest prison is in your own mind, and in your pocket you already hold the key the willingness to take absolute responsibility for your life the willingness to risk the willingness to release yourself from judgment and reclaim your innocence, accepting and loving yourself for who you really are human, imperfect, and whole.It would be interesting to know how many holocaust survivors are still alive There can t be too many, most would be well into their 80s and 90s Edith herself is 90 and her sister Magda who was with her the whole time in Auschwitz is 95 It s so critical we get as many survivor stories published as possible while they are still alive Thank you Edith Eger for sharing your brave and compelling story with us


  8. Samantha Samantha says:

    I will admit that I did not expect to enjoy this book I thought it was going to be another holocaust memoir with a hint of psychological analysis But man, was I wrong.This book was beautifully written, and was a struggle to put down every night This book was a small exercise in self help, disguised as a gorgeous memoir The Choice has genuinely made me change how I think about life I would highly recommend this book.


  9. Cheri Cheri says:

    At the age of 16, Edith Eva Eger, Edie to her friends, was living in Kosice, Slovakia when she, along with one of her two sisters, her mother and father were forced to leave their home behind, and removed to a labor camp, followed by their transfer to Auschwitz It was the last day she would ever see her mother, and where her parents were executedSurvivors don t have time to ask, Why me For survivors, the only relevant question is, What now Dr Josef Mengele has requested entertainm At the age of 16, Edith Eva Eger, Edie to her friends, was living in Kosice, Slovakia when she, along with one of her two sisters, her mother and father were forced to leave their home behind, and removed to a labor camp, followed by their transfer to Auschwitz It was the last day she would ever see her mother, and where her parents were executedSurvivors don t have time to ask, Why me For survivors, the only relevant question is, What now Dr Josef Mengele has requested entertainment by one of the new arrivals, and the girls in this group have pushed her forward knowing he is looking for someone to dance for his entertainment, the orchestra gathering outside Addressing her as little dancer, he commands,dance for me He never takes his eyes off me, but he attends to his duties as he watches I can hear his voice over the music He discusses with the other officer which ones of the hundred girls present will be killed next If I miss a step, if I do anything to displease him, it could be me I dance I dance I am dancing in hell I can t bear to see the executioner as he decides our fates I close my eyes He tosses her a loaf of bread a gesture that will save her life This is not only a memoir of her life in Auschwitz, of how she managed to survive in this literal concentration camp, but also the story of her healing after, her life after, and how she has a unique insight into helping others escape their own concentration camps, the things that hinder us, prevent us from living life to the fullest She also shares stories about patients and their challenges, and some of their breakthroughs A memoir that shows a path to self acceptance, and healing, she has shared a path toward freedom from past fears, from the anger, injustice, unresolved grief, and thefreedom to enjoy the full rich feast of lifeEdith Eger will celebrate her 92nd this September 29th after publishing her memoir just weeks after her 90th birthday She is an amazing woman with an incredible story to share Many thanks, once again, to the Public Library system, and the many Librarians that manage, organize and keep it running, for the loan of this book


  10. Hans Hans says:

    Easily six stars I don t have words to describe this gem Just read it yourself


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