Soldier of the Mist ePUB Ö Soldier of Kindle -


10 thoughts on “Soldier of the Mist

  1. Terry Terry says:

    3.5 to 4 starsPerhaps I m finally growing into Gene Wolfe There are still a lot of things about his writing that irritate me, but now that I ve got a fair number of his works under my belt some even read multiple times and have a clearer idea of what to expect I am finding myselfable to accept most of these elements as challenging rather than offensive I ve come to expect several things from a book by Gene Wolfe an unreliable narrator of course this narrator tends to be a hero with 3.5 to 4 starsPerhaps I m finally growing into Gene Wolfe There are still a lot of things about his writing that irritate me, but now that I ve got a fair number of his works under my belt some even read multiple times and have a clearer idea of what to expect I am finding myselfable to accept most of these elements as challenging rather than offensive I ve come to expect several things from a book by Gene Wolfe an unreliable narrator of course this narrator tends to be a hero with exceptional abilities granted either through birth or the blessings of the gods and is usually irresistible to the opposite sex, a bit of a pill personality wise and often follows some version of the innocent fool template mixed with thetraditional martial hero and who tends to be less interesting than the secondary characters around him a puzzle like narrative that obscuresthan it reveals and impliesthan it states erudition that can be somewhat oppressive in its range and obscurantism the encroachment upon the mundane by the supernatural in both physical and immaterial ways often in the guise of the inexplicable interference of gods or godlike beings with an agenda for the outcome of human affairs water gods and nymphs are an especial favourite and finally a favourite chestnut of Wolfe s is the inclusion of some kind of vampire like creature and or a shapeshifter _Soldier in the Mist_ certainly partakes liberally of all of these I might go so far as to say that Latro, the main character in _Solider of the Mist_, is pretty much Gene Wolfe s wet dream of a protagonist Here we get a narrator so unreliable that he has to sift through his own words each day in order to make sense of them, never mind the poor reader In this Latro is pretty much the polar opposite of Severian, Wolfe s hero from the New Sun series where the young torturer apprentice from the last days of Urth was cursed with an eidetic memory which he still parsed to his own convenience Latro is cursed with a loss of short term memory that makes him unable to remember anything that happened to him on the previous day This state of affairs was brought about by a head injury suffered by the mercenary in as we find out through the course of events the battle of Plataea as he fought for the Persian King Xerxes against the Greek Confederacy The resulting story follows a format not altogether unlike the movie Memento in which a character in a similar situation was forced to rely on post it notes, journals, and tattoos to help him remember who he was and that he was on a path of vengeance For his part Latro has been writing out the events of each day on a scroll and is forced, at least at those times when he is lucky enough either to be reminded by others or happens to read the injunction to Read This Every Day that is emblazoned on the outside of his scroll, to go back and read his own composition in order to understand where he is and who everyone around him might be Like I said the perfect Gene Wolfe narrator The reader of course participates in this attempt to make sense of strange and inexplicable events at the same time as Latro does To add to the confusion for the modern reader and really, it wouldn t be a Gene Wolfe book if he wasn t trying to confuse you now would it is the fact that we are placed squarely in the ancient world and Latro tells us the names of events, places and characters in a literal, and sometimes misconstrued, translation of their name Thus, for example, Athens becomes Thought , the island of Achaia is Redface Island , and Corinth becomes Tower Hill I have to admit that I found this aspect of the novel to be something that added to the flavour of the text for me as opposed to one that jarred I suppose I felt that in adding to the strangeness of the names of places that would otherwise seem too familiar to me from other sources I was better able to approach the world of classical Greece in a new and interesting way The final layer of confusion and obfuscation is added by the fact that in this world the gods and eldritch beings of classical mythology do indeed walk amongst men and are ever ready to utter a gnomic phrase or attempt to further their own mysterious ends by manipulating mere mortals They are usually invisible to those who walk only in the mundane world, but as strange things begin to come visibly to the fore as we read it becomes apparent that a bizarre side effect of Latro s injury is an ability to see this invisible world clearly though of course it s always possible that Latro is just having hallucinations Sometimes these supernatural beings attempt to aid Latro with cryptic guidance while others seem inimical to whatever actions he attempts to take Either way it becomes apparent that he is a pawn in their great game In essence the story is about Latro s quest to be healed of his malady, or barring that to at least find out where he comes from and return to his native land Of course, even with a prophecy from the Shining God to guide him or perhaps because of it things are not that easy We follow Latro across the land of the Hellenes as he attempts to follow the path laid out for him by the god with the aid of several new friends and allies he picks up along the way We are treated throughout to a view of the Greek Confederacy during the time of the Graeco Persian wars from the point of view of a true outsider We also glimpse many of the gods and supernatural beings with which their country appears to be densely populated and learn thatoften than not human events appear to have been driven by the will of the gods and reflect wars that, while perhapsgrand in their scope, are no less petty in their motivations I especially enjoyed Wolfe s characterization of the gods which seemed to be partially Graves ian in the anthropological and geographical emphasis he placed on their names, powers, and nature, but which didn t lose its eldritch character for all of that These are not the relatively clear cut though all too human versions of the Greek gods most readers may befamiliar with Beneath the veneer of civilization and regal glory the chthonic hearts of these gods are dark and dangerous indeed The world of ancient Greece that Wolfe presents is a fascinating one and the struggles and wars of the gods that impinge upon the world of mortals is intriguing, he seems to have a real flair for the numinous and its impact on human life I think having just finished The Iliad was a distinct advantage for me in coming to this book Not only was I still in the mood for the world of ancient Greece, but I was even able to see some of the same concerns and many of the same characters even though the events portrayed in _Soldier of the Mist_ are happening centuries after the fall of Troy I also didn t get the feeling that Wolfe was simply writing modern characters into an ancient setting, his characters were relatable and all displayed familiar aspects of human nature that rang true, but they also seemed to be uniquely suited to and representative of their own milieu I quite enjoyed this book and dove immediately into the sequel Soldier of Arete I haven t lost all of my reservations in regards to Wolfe s method and madness, but overall I think I m becomingwilling to sit back and enjoy the ride I just make sure to stop and look around a lotthan I might feel is needed for another author.Also posted at Shelf Inflicted


  2. Jenny (Reading Envy) Jenny (Reading Envy) says:

    I m still wrapping my head around this book, so consider this review a possibly perpetual work in progress My book club discusses it on Monday so I might haveto add at that point It is thanks to two Gene Wolfe fans that I have read this book one for selecting it and one for providing useful resources to help me understand it better And of course as with anything by Gene Wolfe I ve ever read, now that I know , I feel like to really appreciate this book I would start again from th I m still wrapping my head around this book, so consider this review a possibly perpetual work in progress My book club discusses it on Monday so I might haveto add at that point It is thanks to two Gene Wolfe fans that I have read this book one for selecting it and one for providing useful resources to help me understand it better And of course as with anything by Gene Wolfe I ve ever read, now that I know , I feel like to really appreciate this book I would start again from the beginning.This is different from some of the other books by Wolfe that I have read, those combining science fiction and fantasy, in a far future post tech landscape These instead are set in the historical ancient world and rely heavily on actual texts, plus fantastical elements of the mythology Having only a basic basic knowledge of these ancient times and zero experience with the texts referenced, I may not have had all the background that would have made this an evenenjoyable experience Gene Wolfe is for smart readers.The basic premise is that of Latro, a mercenary with a memory loss problem Because he can only retain about a half of a day at a time, he is constantly transcribing what is happening so he can refer back to it You really only know that he is not a local, and there is so much between the lines that I point you again to the external resources to understand the book The part that will be intriguing to discuss with the book club is whether or not Latro is seeing what he thinks he is seeing Oh and the ending Pinadros shook his head as if in wonder Is it because you can t remember the past that you re so wise, Latro 104 Aforementioned resources, thanks to Ed Names in Soldier of the MistUseful blog, particularly the Decoded entries


  3. Jason Jason says:

    5 Stars I shook my head Knowledge is soon changed, then lost in the mist, an echo half heard If I had ever known them, they were lost in the mist, lost forever as though they had never been Soldier of the Mist is an incredible gem It took me a long time to read it as it had to be savored I have read other books by Gene Wolfe and already considered myself a fan, but to me this book was so muchthan the other novels of his that I have read This is a novel that reads like a historical 5 Stars I shook my head Knowledge is soon changed, then lost in the mist, an echo half heard If I had ever known them, they were lost in the mist, lost forever as though they had never been Soldier of the Mist is an incredible gem It took me a long time to read it as it had to be savored I have read other books by Gene Wolfe and already considered myself a fan, but to me this book was so muchthan the other novels of his that I have read This is a novel that reads like a historical fiction book with a spattering of poetry The story combined with the eloquent writing made this seem like old school poetry to me.What an amazing story and what a journey for our damaged protagonist Latro This is a story that is a cross between Chris Nolan s Memento and the Iliad Wolfe has created a work of art that really took me by surprise The main plot is worth the read in itself The amazing places that it takes us the icing on the cake Our hero is a soldier and a slave and a man without a past He suffers a grievous head wound that should have killed him but thanks to the God s that intervene he survives Problem is he cannot remember one day to the next if not for the scroll that he writes everything down in On the plus side Latro can now commune with the Gods as a result of his wound and what a motley crew do they turn out to be Simply magical.A snippet Then you shall have such gifts as are mine to give Hear my attributes I am a god of divination, of music, of death, and of healing I am the slayer of wolves and the master of the sun I prophesy that though you will wander far in search of your home, you will not find it until you are farthest from it Once only, you will sing as men sang in the Age of Gold to the playing of the gods Long after, you will find what you seek in the dead city Though healing is mine, I cannot heal you, nor would I if I could by the shrine of the Great Mother you fell, to a shrine of hers you must return Then she will point the way, and in the end the wolf s tooth will return to her who sent it A poem that is relevant to the story Look under the sun, if you would see Sing Make sacrifice to me But you must cross the narrow sea.The wolf that howls has wrought you woe To that dog s mistress you must go Her hearth burns in the room below.I send you to the God Unseen Whose temple lies in Death s terrene There you shall learn why He s not seen.Sing then, and make the hills resound King, nymph, and priest shall gather round Wolf, faun, and nymph, spellbound This is a masterpiece of writing and story telling and it does not even matter thatbooks follow this one My highest recommendations


  4. Perry Whitford Perry Whitford says:

    Latro awakes in a medical tent of the Great King Xerxes defeated army just after the battle of Platea with a severe head wound and no memory of how he got there He is given a scroll and a stylus to write down his experiences, which will be his only way of knowing who he is and where he is going for, as each day dawns, his memory vanishes into the mist.So begins the most astonishing work of historical fantasy fiction I am yet to read As you may imagine by the affliction of the protagonist, Wol Latro awakes in a medical tent of the Great King Xerxes defeated army just after the battle of Platea with a severe head wound and no memory of how he got there He is given a scroll and a stylus to write down his experiences, which will be his only way of knowing who he is and where he is going for, as each day dawns, his memory vanishes into the mist.So begins the most astonishing work of historical fantasy fiction I am yet to read As you may imagine by the affliction of the protagonist, Wolfe has a whale of a time with Latro a reliable narrator who never tells a lie, yet who tells a disjointed and baffling story, cursed as he is to forget everyone and everything from day to day.His amnesia is so complete that he can t recognise the people he travels across most of ancient Greece with, and of course has no recollection of his or their actions before the current day, nor whether they are a friend or foe Many readers have already made a comparison with the Christopher Nolan film Momento and it s as close as I can think of too Nolan must have read this book before he wrote that screenplay.The premise is only one of the joys of this novel though I love the world of ancient Greece and the theogony of the Olympians Wolfe takes his tack from Hesiod and Homer, so the Gods are real to the characters and they appear often, particularly to Latro, who as the story evolves is revealed as an unwitting yet willful pawn in one of their internecine struggles, just as he is manipulated by the earthly Spartans and Athenians.Add to that some incredibly complex but satisfying plotting, Wolfe s simple yet stunning prose, and a continual sequence of strange and wonderful scenes and you simply couldn t ask forfrom this kind of story There are two further books in this series, both great as well the second is probably even better than this one Get hold of a copy of this as soon as you can Unlike Latro, you won t forget it


  5. Juho Pohjalainen Juho Pohjalainen says:

    By this time I ve come to the conclusion that trying to do serious reviews of Gene Wolfe s books, right after reading them, is quite the waste of time much like trying to grasp at mist, for that is how it now feels in my mind.It s been a weird hazy ride, but oddly enjoyable and with good characters Fine writing too, as always with Wolfe I ll sayonce I give this a second read.


  6. Max Max says:

    A fun lark from Wolfe I wish that I could rate this a 4 or even 5 for the quality of the prose and the immersive world Wolfe has created, but my enjoyment was hampered at several points by Wolfe s fucked up gender politics Having read something like 8 or 9 of his books now, I m seriously sick of Every Single Female Character being either a na ve child, a magical entity godess who is usually trying to kill or seduce the protagonist , or literally a prostitute I am seriously starting to A fun lark from Wolfe I wish that I could rate this a 4 or even 5 for the quality of the prose and the immersive world Wolfe has created, but my enjoyment was hampered at several points by Wolfe s fucked up gender politics Having read something like 8 or 9 of his books now, I m seriously sick of Every Single Female Character being either a na ve child, a magical entity godess who is usually trying to kill or seduce the protagonist , or literally a prostitute I am seriously starting to get the feeling that Gene Wolfe does not view females as fully human It s fucking horrible.But I must be honest and talk about how I loved this book Really loved it Latro is possibly the first ever Gene Wolfe protagonist I have liked and rooted for His voice is a pretty awesome creation, and it s fun to watch Wolfe play with his style and take on kinds of writing he has largely avoided in other books It was also obvious he had a hell of a lot of fun writing this book He clearly loves the setting, and has always wanted to write about it


  7. Alissa Alissa says:

    3.5 stars rounded up because by the end, I was hooked.Drugs work wonders on a person who knows his history, or at least, that was my persistent thought while I was reading this book I m not being wholly fair, after all the protagonist of this original story suffered a head injury compounded by the curse of a goddess, he has the ability to see unseen things and wakes every day with little to none recollection of what passed before So he writes down as much as he can, and he s consequently a 3.5 stars rounded up because by the end, I was hooked.Drugs work wonders on a person who knows his history, or at least, that was my persistent thought while I was reading this book I m not being wholly fair, after all the protagonist of this original story suffered a head injury compounded by the curse of a goddess, he has the ability to see unseen things and wakes every day with little to none recollection of what passed before So he writes down as much as he can, and he s consequently a very peculiar narrator.The tale is set in Ancient Greece and there are lots of gods, city states, myths and violence Latro s quest is interesting, but the most intriguing part is seeing the world through his eyes, a man with incomplete and totally unreliable memory, who is often unable to even recognize his own companions, let alone his purpose, all depending on the time of the day and wether he had been able to reread his ever growing account or not The language is elegant but not complicated thankfully, because following plot and interactions is not generally easy rightfully so, no spoon feeding the reader , and both style and narrative devices convey a vivid picture of Latro s circumstances and the other characters reactions to his particular predicament and divine inspired abilities.Very recommended, it s a compelling blend of fantasy, historical fiction and great authorial craft And it struck me then that the sea was the world, and everything else the city, the towering crag of limestone, the very ships that floated upon it and the fish that swam in it was only exceptional, only oddities like the bits of leaf or straw one sees in a globe of amber.I was myself a mariner on that sea, a sailor at the mercy of wind and wave, lost in the mists and hearing breakers on the reefs of a rocky coast.


  8. Serena Serena says:

    I imagine a Romanticized reason to why we call the language of Rome, Latin, is for their latro, or soldiers However, that s not a true linguist root.I have wanted to read this series for many years, before, in fact, the Percy Jackson books came out, but it s one of those books which I had never much luck in finding If honest I am touchy about historical fantasy and mythology, if done wrong, I can t seem to keep my temper and it will sour my reading for weeks if done right and this is done a I imagine a Romanticized reason to why we call the language of Rome, Latin, is for their latro, or soldiers However, that s not a true linguist root.I have wanted to read this series for many years, before, in fact, the Percy Jackson books came out, but it s one of those books which I had never much luck in finding If honest I am touchy about historical fantasy and mythology, if done wrong, I can t seem to keep my temper and it will sour my reading for weeks if done right and this is done almost PERFECTLY I just adore it to pieces.Latro wakes after a battle based on a factual battle in 479 BC which Herodotos relates with a head injury, he doesn t know his name, his people, his home, or even what side of the battle he had been fighting on But, it s supposed by the physician that is the Great King s although no one knows his true name, his friend known throughout the book only as the mysterious black man , who speaks neither Hellenic Greek or the language that Latro naturally writes in, yet remains a loyal if silent friend, with a equally unknown past, while they communicate in a finger language.It is soon found that Latro has offended Demeter, the Great Mother, and at the dawn of each day he forgets what he knew the day previously Yet without the mist of memory he sees the divine gods and goddesses of Greece On his journey he is helped by Io and Pindaros, enslaved by Hypereides, Kalleos and the Rope Men regent, Pausanias.What Latro s most desires is to find his friends, and, he hopes, countrymen, and this is promised to him by a daughter of Demeter, but the promises and favors of goddesses can be perilous as Eurykles, or Drakaina could prove at the end There is a certain charm in the use of translated places names from Greece by Latro, that gives a sense of displaced wrongness throughout, and pulls sympathy to Latro and his journey


  9. Kelly Flanagan Kelly Flanagan says:

    I have to say that not since reading Tale of Two Cities in grade 7, has reading 250 or so pages taken me so long I am some one that falls asleep reading I consider reading to have been my first addiction Wayimportant than coffee or smokes But this book was hard And I will admit that I didn t end up really getting the story in the end Hopefully those of you who take on this book will have an easier time with it than I did.


  10. Daniel Polansky Daniel Polansky says:

    Frequent readers Surely there must be some better use of yourthat is to say, one might learn Spanish or perhaps do a puzzlewell, you re here already, might as well stay will know that I have a complicated relationship with Gene Wolfe For The Book of the New Sun, his marvelous short fiction, and the truly masterful Peace, I would argue that Wolfe is one of and probably the foremost living writer of speculative fiction, that is to say, fiction And yet the rest of his work I confess to fi Frequent readers Surely there must be some better use of yourthat is to say, one might learn Spanish or perhaps do a puzzlewell, you re here already, might as well stay will know that I have a complicated relationship with Gene Wolfe For The Book of the New Sun, his marvelous short fiction, and the truly masterful Peace, I would argue that Wolfe is one of and probably the foremost living writer of speculative fiction, that is to say, fiction And yet the rest of his work I confess to finding generally impenetrable, even viewed with the most positive possible spin I feel comfortable writing bad things about a beloved literary hero of mine because a he will never, ever read this and b Wolfe is of that class of writer who deserves to be discussed not simply with enthusiasm but with serious, studious contemplation, contemplation which may led to criticism Soldiers of the Mist and Soldiers of Arete are the story of the falsely named Latro, who suffers a wound during the Persian Wars which renders him lose his memory each evening but which also allows him to see the ways in which the gods interact directly with humanity He wanders about Greece and Asia Minor, trying to find a way to restore his memory and interacting with the heroes and gods of classical Greece The clever conceit with Latro s memory allows Wolfe to indulge in a late period tic he developed, that of roughly ending a chapter and using the bulk of the next to explain, in his loose way, to the degree that Wolfe ever explains anything, what exactly happened in the preceding entry In Book of The Long Sun this tendency drove me absolutely apeshit, but here it works much better, and Wolfe does as he always does some clever things with Latro s memory and observations Wolfe is an intentionally frustrating writer, and when that works, it works to great effect But often it comes off as over coy, his refusal to describe any character in useful detail, or shoving a critical but not particularly clever clue into a dull front half of a paragraph Here also, in true Wolfe fashion, we have his predilection for long digressions about what are clearly specific interests of his, sword fighting or siege craft, that drag down the narrative and just generally seem unacceptable in a book which often refuses to provide basic information on farrelevant concerns Finally and most critically, Wolfe s characters here seem terribly thin, really the faintest of possible sketches One gets the sense that he is not really interested in them, nor for that matter in the prose itself, but only in the skeleton beneath it, in his own love of riddle.But of course, it goes without saying that he has a genius for said riddles, a genius which few other writers, certainly no one who is considered a direct competitor, can honestly claim When one of thesignificant puzzles does work, and when you are clever enough to understand it, the sensation can be quite thrilling Which is, I suppose, to say that this is another book which I did not like particularly but reconfirms needlessly my faith in Gene Wolfe s unique powers


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Soldier of the Mist ❮KINDLE❯ ❥ Soldier of the Mist ❆ Author Gene Wolfe – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Gene Wolfe has turned to the fantastic historical world of Greece, in BC when the gods walked the Earth Latro, a mercenary soldier from the north, has suffered a head wound in battle and has been sep Gene Wolfe has turned to the fantastic historical world of Greece, inBC when the gods walked the Earth Latro, a mercenary soldier from the north, has suffered a head wound in Soldier of Kindle - battle and has been separated from his compatriots He has not only lost the memory of who he is and where he is from, he has also lost the ability to remember from day to day and must live out of context in an eternal present, every day rediscovering the shreds of his identity and the nature of the world around him, aided only by a written record that he attempts to continue daily and must read every morningBut in recompense for his unhappy condition Latro has received the ability to see and converse with invisible beings, all the gods and goddesses, ghosts and demons and werewolves, who inhabit the land and affect the lives of others, all unseen Everyone knows that supernatural creatures are constantly around them and sometimes, under special circumstances, can perceive them but Latro is now constantly able to penetrate the veil of the supernatural, which is both a triumph and a danger.

    Soldier of the Mist ePUB Ö Soldier of Kindle - by a written record that he attempts to continue daily and must read every morningBut in recompense for his unhappy condition Latro has received the ability to see and converse with invisible beings, all the gods and goddesses, ghosts and demons and werewolves, who inhabit the land and affect the lives of others, all unseen Everyone knows that supernatural creatures are constantly around them and sometimes, under special circumstances, can perceive them but Latro is now constantly able to penetrate the veil of the supernatural, which is both a triumph and a danger."/>
  • Paperback
  • 335 pages
  • Soldier of the Mist
  • Gene Wolfe
  • English
  • 14 January 2019
  • 0812558154

About the Author: Gene Wolfe

Gene Wolfe was an American science fiction and fantasy writer He was noted for his dense, allusive prose as well as the strong influence of his Catholic faith, to which he Soldier of Kindle - converted after marrying a Catholic He was a prolific short story writer and a novelist, and has won many awards in the fieldThe Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master Award is given by SFWA for lifetime achievement in science fiction and or fantasy Wolfe joins the Grand Master ranks alongside such legends as Connie Willis, Michael Moorcock, Anne McCaffrey, Robert Silverberg, Ursula K Le Guin, Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury and Joe Haldeman The award will be presented at the th Annual Nebula Awards Weekend in San Jose, CA, May , While attending Texas AM University Wolfe published his first speculative fiction in The Commentator, a student literary journal Wolfe dropped out during his junior year, and was drafted to fight in the Korean War After returning to the United States he earned a degree from the University of Houston and became an industrial engineer He edited the journal Plant Engineering for many years before retiring to write full time, but his most famous professional engineering achievement is a contribution to the machine used to make Pringles potato crisps He lived in Barrington, Illinois, a suburb of ChicagoA frequent Hugo nominee without a win, Wolfe has nevertheless picked up several Nebula and Locus Awards, among others, including the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement and the Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master Award He is also a member of the Science Fiction Hall of Fametp uscmillan author genewolfe.