Foul Deeds & Suspicious Deaths in Guernsey Kindle



10 thoughts on “Foul Deeds & Suspicious Deaths in Guernsey

  1. Rhiana Rhiana says:

    I can credit the author with the scope of her research there are indeed a lot of details in the book, however, this entire endeavour seems to be invalidated by the author s mistaken approach to the Channel Islands in the sense of identifying them as culturally English, rather than as distinct predominately rural and maritime Normans Mistakenly viewing the Channel Islanders as essentially English puts an entirely different spin on the stories told, and while perhaps making Guernsey people seem I can credit the author with the scope of her research there are indeed a lot of details in the book, however, this entire endeavour seems to be invalidated by the author s mistaken approach to the Channel Islands in the sense of identifying them as culturally English, rather than as distinct predominately rural and maritime Normans Mistakenly viewing the Channel Islanders as essentially English puts an entirely different spin on the stories told, and while perhaps making Guernsey people seemdastardly in their approach to English law, it is a cheap trick The book is full of similar cheap tricks, and reliance on trite stereotypes e.g A 100 was offered for information, but nobody came forward strange considering the Guernseyman s love of money , which I can only surmise comes from the author s incapacity for imaginative and compelling writing.While some research was done, it seems to be superficial and concerned only with the stories themselves It was a horror to hear the language of Guernsey described as a patois of English and French , which is profoundly incorrect and deeply insulting on numerous levels the language being a well preserved variant of insular norman, and a language in its own right Further, it was bizarre also to read that Guernsey people consider themselves English except when it comes to law when that certainly is never my impression Guernsey people are not and do not consider themselves English, despite extensive colonisation by the English in recent centuries.I was familiar before reading the book with some of the stories, and although clearly spiced up , the stories seem to be generally correct It is basic of the author however to use the crimes of predominately English and French individuals temporarily based in Guernsey, as a means of suggesting the islanders themselves had criminal leanings in their culture The author is correct however in belief in witchcraft as remnants of the Celtic religions which were intensely strong here , as well as the resorting to piracy and smuggling with the collapse of the wool industry Guernsey pirates did target English ships, but not being English people and loyal only to the Duke of Normandy who happens to be the King or Queen of England too, this is noshocking than targeting French ships, or Spanish ships, which the author hypocritically makes out was slightlyacceptable due to her incorrect view that Guernsey people are in some way English.Where I was not familiar with the stories, I felt it is wise to read each with huge scepticism while the details of the stories are extensive, because the author hasn t conducted some of the most basic research into the cultural background of the place she is researching, it s hard to take what she has written seriously.The research into the details of the stories is comprehensive and commendable, but unfortunately, the same effort has not been given to see the bigger picture Attempts have been made to make the writingcompelling, but they just feel cheap The result is an unimaginative book which leaves the reader who is familiar with Guernsey wincing in discomfort over the sweeping misapprehensions of the author, and the lazy clich s employed by her


  2. Bettie Bettie says:

    On to Susie and Judy in SC This is a perfect read for me Most of the deeds outlined here are drawn from the Victorian era or before so, hopefully, there is no one alive to become upset about opening up the foul play for perusal There are a couple of WWII related sections and you get the feeling that it is still a people divided over just what happened under Nazi occupation It is alluded to onthan a few occasions here that some of the islanders did not play fair and that there is sti On to Susie and Judy in SC This is a perfect read for me Most of the deeds outlined here are drawn from the Victorian era or before so, hopefully, there is no one alive to become upset about opening up the foul play for perusal There are a couple of WWII related sections and you get the feeling that it is still a people divided over just what happened under Nazi occupation It is alluded to onthan a few occasions here that some of the islanders did not play fair and that there is still some paranoia surrounding the whole business.Loads of interesting Celtic history, bits about those enigmatic Beaker people and I must draw your attention to the fact that Victor Hugo penned Les Miserables at his lecturn in St Peter s Port Did I mention it is crammed full of old photo s Castle Cornet, St Peter Port, was built of grey granite for the defence of Guernsey after King John had lost Normandy to the French image error Concentration camps on Alderney


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Foul Deeds & Suspicious Deaths in Guernsey [Read] ➬ Foul Deeds & Suspicious Deaths in Guernsey Author Glynis Cooper – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Contains chapters that investigate the darker side of humanity in cases of murder, deceit and pure malice From crimes of passion to opportunistic killings and coldly premeditated acts of murder, this Contains chapters & Suspicious PDF/EPUB ì that investigate the darker side of humanity in cases of murder, deceit and pure malice From crimes of passion to opportunistic killings and coldly premeditated acts of murder, this work recounts the spectrum of criminality, bringing to life the sinister history of Guernsey from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century.