Iluzii pierdute PDF Ê Paperback

Iluzii pierdute ❴Download❵ ➽ Iluzii pierdute Author HonorĂ© de Balzac – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk A Angoul me, David S chard, un jeune po te id aliste, embauche dans son imprimerie un ami de coll ge, Lucien Chardon, qui prendra bient t le nom de sa m re, Rubempr Po te lui aussi, il b n ficie d une A Angoul me, David S chard, un jeune po te id aliste, embauche dans son imprimerie un ami de coll ge, Lucien Chardon, qui prendra bient t le nom de sa m re, Rubempr Po te lui aussi, il b n ficie d une sorte de gloire locale et fr quente le salon de Louise de Bargeton qui le lie bient t une intrigue sentimentale qui fait tant jaser que tous les deux partent pour Paris Voil bient t Lucien lanc dans le monde des lettres aussi bien que de la haute soci t , mais si Paris est la ville des gens sup rieurs , ce sera galement pour lui celle des d sillusions C est bien la figure de Lucien, en effet, qui donne surtout son unit aux Illusions perdues qui ont d abord t , de, une suite de trois romans devenus plus tard les trois parties de celui que nous lisons, quand Balzac eut con u le projet de La Com die humaine et d cid de faire de sa trilogie l une des Sc nes de la vie de province Car si Paris reste bien au c ur du triptyque, c est Angoul me, n anmoins, que se noue le destin des h ros, Angoul me encore qu il s assombrit Revenu dans sa ville natale, Lucien n est pas loin d y sombrer avant une v ritable ascension dont Balzac fera le r cit dans un autre grand livre Splendeurs et mis res des courtisanes.


10 thoughts on “Iluzii pierdute

  1. Jeffrey Keeten Jeffrey Keeten says:

    No man should marry until he has studied anatomy and dissected at least one woman When I left the farm at the age of 18 and jerry rigged my battered Camaro into a sputtering, but functional machine that could, by the grace of all that is holy, get me to Phoenix I might have bore resemblance to Lucien de Rubempre the hero of Lost Illusions Well, okay, there were some differences I did not look like a Greek God I did not have David Sechard as a best friend who lent me his last 1,000 francs No man should marry until he has studied anatomy and dissected at least one woman When I left the farm at the age of 18 and jerry rigged my battered Camaro into a sputtering, but functional machine that could, by the grace of all that is holy, get me to Phoenix I might have bore resemblance to Lucien de Rubempre the hero of Lost Illusions Well, okay, there were some differences I did not look like a Greek God I did not have David Sechard as a best friend who lent me his last 1,000 francs for my trip to Phoenix Paris I most importantly did not have an aristocratic companion in the form of Madame de Bargeton, the queen of society in Angouleme I definitely left the farm on the wrong footing As it turns out despite Lucien s advantages his spectacular rise and fall in Paris society far eclipsed my own bumpy yet steady meandering attempt to be successful in the big city Drawing from the Folio editionThe first hurdle to be cleared by both Lucien and Madame de Bargeton was entry into Parisian Aristocratic society Madame may have had the proper name, but she had been in the sticks way too long and had fallen behind on the current fashions and the latest affectations Lucien, though a beautiful manly specimen, wore the wrong clothes Clothes that were very nice for the country, but were outdated and ragged when compared to the festive clothing worn by the Parisian dandies In other words both found the other wanting and a detriment to their efforts to fit in to the society they wished to become accustomed too Madame de Bargeton, in a fit of survival, jettisoned her Greek God Lucien, even though he had been thinking similar thoughts, was upset over the betrayal plotted revenge and quickly found himself mired in poverty He took up with a bunch of philosophical writers, who despite their superior intelligence or because of it refused to try and be successful As taken as Lucien is by their high ideals and their comradeship he quickly moves away from their company once he meets the con man Etienne Lousteau Drawing from the Folio editionLousteau calls himself a journalist, but really he is a blackmailer, glib tongue seducer, and thief Lucien meets Lousteau at the moment that he is in a midst of a deal to become editor of a newspaper Lousteau likes Lucien,importantly he sees that he can be of use to him, and shows him how to use his pen to make money He ensnares him in the fine art of reviewing books, taking the best qualities of a novel and negating those qualities by presenting them as weaknesses He shows him how to receive bribes in theater seats in exchange for positive reviews Lucien, who was a good writer, soon found himself in a position of writing positive and negative reviews of the same book or the same play and taking money from publishers not to eviscerate their latest offering Etienne and Lucien both are living with beautiful actresses and making a very good living, but their lifestyle far outreaches their pocketbooks and soon each finds themselves on the edge of disgrace In an act of desperation Lucien forges David s signature on bank loans that have devastating consequences for his friend brother in law and sister There are manysubplots that are complicated enough that separate reviews could be composed for each Balzac does an amazing job juggling the plots without confusing the reader Each new revelation has far reaching ramifications and I found myself squirming in my seat as each new piece of the puzzle is revealed Balzac creates a whole host of characters, wonderful characters, some who have bit parts, but have larger roles to play as part of the grander scheme of the world of the Human Comedy Characters flow in and out of his books In one book they may have a large role and in another a mere scene He wrote 92 books that composed the Human Comedy and had sketches for 55He created over 3,000 characters Balzac is surprisingly funny, with skewering wit and a telescopic eye for human behavior He was part of the realism movement and the characters of these books are the same people that are serving us coffee, delivering our mail, writing newspaper articles, and lending us money today People have the same foibles and good qualities as they did a hundred years ago In the form of Eve, David s wife and Lucien s sister, Balzac also reminds us of those few really special people that we occasionally meet who exemplify what we all wish to be.nice BalzacI got to say I m hooked I am curious to see what happens toof these characters and in the span of one book I ve only met a very few of the characters that Balzac brings to life in the Human Comedy I must meet the rest I will readBalzac.If you wish to seeof my most recent book and movie reviews, visit also have a Facebook blogger page at


  2. Ahmad Sharabiani Ahmad Sharabiani says:

    912 Illusions perdues Lost Illusions The Human Comedy, 1799 1850 , Honor de BalzacIllusions is a serial novel, written by the French writer, Honor de Balzac, between 1837 and 1843 It consists of three parts, starting in provincial France, thereafter moving to Paris, and finally returning to the provinces Thus it resembles another of Balzac s greatest novels, The Black Sheep, 1842, in that it is set partly in Paris and partly in the provinces It is, however, unique among the novels and s 912 Illusions perdues Lost Illusions The Human Comedy, 1799 1850 , Honor de BalzacIllusions is a serial novel, written by the French writer, Honor de Balzac, between 1837 and 1843 It consists of three parts, starting in provincial France, thereafter moving to Paris, and finally returning to the provinces Thus it resembles another of Balzac s greatest novels, The Black Sheep, 1842, in that it is set partly in Paris and partly in the provinces It is, however, unique among the novels and short stories of The Human Comedy, 1799 1850 1977 1337 744 19


  3. Michael Finocchiaro Michael Finocchiaro says:

    Unfortunately for most French people, they were forced to read Balzac in school and were not given the real time or context to fully appreciate his work Plus they mostly only get the highly moralistic Peau de Chagrin and, fed up, finish their book report and never seek out Balzac again That is quite unfortunate particularly when it comes to this particular masterpiece In Illusions Perdues, we have one of French literatures greatest bildungsroman ever with the coming of age of the two protagon Unfortunately for most French people, they were forced to read Balzac in school and were not given the real time or context to fully appreciate his work Plus they mostly only get the highly moralistic Peau de Chagrin and, fed up, finish their book report and never seek out Balzac again That is quite unfortunate particularly when it comes to this particular masterpiece In Illusions Perdues, we have one of French literatures greatest bildungsroman ever with the coming of age of the two protagonists I will absolutely not spoil the story here because it must be read and enjoyed And please do not forget to read the wonderful sequel, Splendeurs et Mis res des Courtesans which is every bit as real and gripping and beautiful as this one


  4. Joselito Honestly and Brilliantly Joselito Honestly and Brilliantly says:

    Honore de Balzac wasn t finished writing yet when he died on 18 August 1850 Yet at the time of his death he had already written a good number of journal articles and some 90 novels The literary characters he had created are estimated to be between 2,000 to 3,000 Was he sick Did he have some sort of a mania for writing on and on No The secret of his prolificness, I guess, was in his favorite drink It was said that at one time he wrote for 18 straight hours, without sleep, subsisting only o Honore de Balzac wasn t finished writing yet when he died on 18 August 1850 Yet at the time of his death he had already written a good number of journal articles and some 90 novels The literary characters he had created are estimated to be between 2,000 to 3,000 Was he sick Did he have some sort of a mania for writing on and on No The secret of his prolificness, I guess, was in his favorite drink It was said that at one time he wrote for 18 straight hours, without sleep, subsisting only on black coffee.CAFE BALZAC would be a nice name for a coffee shop The different brews offered there could be named after his novels Pere Goriot, Louis Lambert, Cousin Bette, Cousin Pons, Eugenie Grandet, etc Lost Illusions would be in a monster of a cup Having it should be like endlessly sipping an ocean of coffee Black, with enough caffeine to shock one s nerves and make him want to write to calm himself.This is the story of Lucien Chardon a cake in the coffee shop could be named after him, lucien sounds luscious , a young, handsome poet, well intentioned but vain and stupid Living in a provincial town, he dreams of getting rich and famous He catches the fancy of the aristocratic Madame de Bagerton, married but a real hot mama Thinking that they are in love with each other, they go to gay Paris There, they promptly lose their illusion about this love They part ways, bitterly.Destitute and hungry, Lucien befriends fellow poets, writers and artists who although similarly poor like him value personal and creative integrity above all else But he also stumbles upon characters, including journalists, who value money above all else He is sucked into this life of double dealing, journalistic blackmail, corruption and dishonesty, enjoying it for the money, fame and sex it brings He is again disillusioned but likes the compensation.This new society he has embraced, however, does not embrace him back He is betrayed and rejected Thus he loses another illusion and comes back to his hometown like a beaten dog with his tail between his legs.But alas It seems his town considers him a hero of sorts with the fleeting fame and momentary wealth he had acquired before So he struts his feathers onceand attempts to save his loved ones his mother, sister and her husband David who is also his best friend from the ruin he has brought them into This, however, proves to be illusory once .He now walks alone, planning to drown himself But he meets a 48 year old Spanish priest Hey, I said to myself, a happy ending after all A man of God shall be an instrument to Lucien s redemption But no It was my turn to lose an illusion This priest s advice to Lucien sounds like it is based on Machiavelli s The Prince than on the Holy Bible He may even be harboring sexy thoughts because after giving Lucien money and promising him a job as his secretary he kissed him on the forehead, tenderly , Balzac however took care to point out , alluding to the profound friendship of man to man whichmakes woman of no account The descriptions here of characters, places, legal proceedings, the printing business, paper making, parties, the theater, intrigues and what not are so lush that reading them is like wading through the foliage of thejungle during the time of the dinosaurs For its dialogues, the characters often throw full length essays against each other thoughts and recollections were sometimes like treatises and characters are so numerous they swarm like ants on a pool of molasses.Six hundred thirty pages excluding endnotes, the introduction, Balzac s brief biographical outline and comments on him and his works by various authors You ll need a lot of coffee to get through this But it s all worth it, may I add


  5. notgettingenough notgettingenough says:

    Update I am happy to report that when I wrote on social media for my friends that I d finished a Balzac that could be thus described as below , Gareth, immediately guessed Lost Illusions My comparison was presumably apt.Blackadder describing a novel he s written Edmund A Butler s Tale A huge, roller coaster of a novel in four hundred sizzling chapters A searing indictment of domestic servitude in the eighteenth century, with some hot gypsies thrown in Okay, so Balzac s novel is early Update I am happy to report that when I wrote on social media for my friends that I d finished a Balzac that could be thus described as below , Gareth, immediately guessed Lost Illusions My comparison was presumably apt.Blackadder describing a novel he s written Edmund A Butler s Tale A huge, roller coaster of a novel in four hundred sizzling chapters A searing indictment of domestic servitude in the eighteenth century, with some hot gypsies thrown in Okay, so Balzac s novel is early nineteenth century, it s hot teenage actresses, not gypsies and the indictment is of society as a whole nothing escapes Balzac s eye But in spirit, Lost Illusions is Edmund to a tee Sizzling roller coaster ride that never stops, indeed.Detail to come.Posted earlier This is premature, but what a wonderful passage I ve just read, about one sixth into the book It could have been written last night about today Our hero, in the business, is explaining to the woman to whom he is proposing how the paper industry for printing works.And for this reason although linen lasts so much longer than cotton, that it is in reality cheaper in the end, the poor would rather make the smaller outlay in the first instance, and, by virtue of the law of _Vae victis _ pay enormouslybefore they have done The middle classes do the same So there is a scarcity of linen In England, where four fifths of the population use cotton to the exclusion of linen, they make nothing but cotton paper The cotton paper is very soft and easily creased to begin with, and it has a further defect it is so soluble that if you seep a book made of cotton paper in water for fifteen minutes, it turns to a pulp, while an old book left in water for a couple of hours is not spoilt You could dry the old book, and the pages, though yellow and faded, would still be legible, the work would not be destroyed There is a time coming when legislation will equalize our fortunes, and we shall all be poor together we shall want our linen and our books to be cheap, just as people are beginning to prefer small pictures because they have not wall space enough for large ones Well, the shirts and the books will not last, that is all it is the same on all sides, solidity is drying out So this problem is one of the first importance for literature, science, and politics One day, in my office, there was a hot discussion going on about the material that the Chinese use for making paper Their paper is far better than ours, because the raw material is better and a good deal was said about this thin, light Chinese paper, for if it is light and thin, the texture is close, there are no transparent spots in it In Paris there are learned men among the printers readers Fourier and Pierre Leroux are Lachevardiere s readers at this moment and the Comte de Saint Simon, who happened to be correcting proofs for us, came in in the middle of the discussion He told us at once that, according to Kempfer and du Halde, the Broussonetia furnishes the substance of the Chinese paper it is a vegetable substance like linen or cotton for that matter Another reader maintained that Chinese paper was principally made of an animal substance, to wit, the silk that is abundant there They made a bet about it in my presence The Messieurs Didot are printers to the Institute, so naturally they referred the question to that learned body M Marcel, who used to be superintendent of the Royal Printing Establishment, was umpire, and he sent the two readers to M l Abbe Grozier, Librarian at the Arsenal By the Abbe s decision they both lost their wages The paper was not made of silk nor yet from the _Broussonetia_ the pulp proved to be the triturated fibre of some kind of bamboo The Abbe Grozier had a Chinese book, an iconographical and technological work, with a great many pictures in it, illustrating all the different processes of paper making, and he showed us a picture of the workshop with the bamboo stalks lying in a heap in the corner it was extremely well drawn Lucien told me that your father, with the intuition of a man of talent, had a glimmering of a notion of some way of replacing linen rags with an exceedingly common vegetable product, not previously manufactured, but taken direct from the soil, as the Chinese use vegetable fibre at first hand I have classified the guesses made by those who came before me, and have begun to study the question The bamboo is a kind of reed naturally I began to think of the reeds that grow here in France Labor is very cheap in China, where a workman earns three halfpence a day, and this cheapness of labor enables the Chinese to manipulate each sheet of paper separately They take it out of the mould, and press it between heated tablets of white porcelain, that is the secret of the surface and consistence, the lightness and satin smoothness of the best paper in the world Well, here in Europe the work must be done by machinery machinery must take the place of cheap Chinese labor If we could but succeed in making a cheap paper of as good a quality, the weight and thickness of printed books would be reduced bythan one half A set of Voltaire, printed on our woven paper and bound, weighs about two hundred and fifty pounds it would only weigh fifty if we used Chinese paper That surely would be a triumph, for the housing of many books has come to be a difficulty everything has grown smaller of late this is not an age of giants men have shrunk, everything about them shrinks, and house room into the bargain Great mansions and great suites of rooms will be abolished sooner or later in Paris, for no one will afford to live in the great houses built by our forefathers What a disgrace for our age if none of its books should last Dutch paper that is, paper made from flax will be quite unobtainable in ten years time


  6. Tim Tim says:

    Lost Illusions tells the story of a good looking young man who lusts after fame in Paris and as a result brings his supportive good natured provincial family to bankruptcy It s a rather long winded novel In common with many 19th century novelists Balzac does like to give elaborate descriptions of everything he sees Thus every room is presented to us in meticulous detail wonderful if you want to research interior design in 19th century France on the tedious side otherwise every character s Lost Illusions tells the story of a good looking young man who lusts after fame in Paris and as a result brings his supportive good natured provincial family to bankruptcy It s a rather long winded novel In common with many 19th century novelists Balzac does like to give elaborate descriptions of everything he sees Thus every room is presented to us in meticulous detail wonderful if you want to research interior design in 19th century France on the tedious side otherwise every character s physiognomy is put under a microscope even though they may never appear again It s a facet of the novel that has been greatly improved over the decades He s also rather over keen on aphorisms But on the whole this was a brilliantly moving novel which very convincingly created an entire world in a particular moment of history In an ideal world though it would be clipped of a couple hundred of its very many pages


  7. [P] [P] says:

    For me there are a great many things that contribute to a rewarding reading experience, an almost ineffable series of qualities that a novel must possess for me to be able to enjoy it Indeed, these things are what I am looking for when I am sat on my bed losing my mind for days on end, surrounded by shaky towers of books Yet there is perhaps a single, fairly straightforward thing that elevates my favourites above the others, which is that I see something of myself in them Theof myself I For me there are a great many things that contribute to a rewarding reading experience, an almost ineffable series of qualities that a novel must possess for me to be able to enjoy it Indeed, these things are what I am looking for when I am sat on my bed losing my mind for days on end, surrounded by shaky towers of books Yet there is perhaps a single, fairly straightforward thing that elevates my favourites above the others, which is that I see something of myself in them Theof myself I see, theI cherish the book I imagine most people feel that way There is, however, one book that feels almost as though the author was possessed of the ability to see into the future, to fasten onto some kid from northern England and follow his progress, or deterioration, over the space of around twelve months That book is Lost Illusions by Honore de Balzac.I don t, of course, want to make the entire review about me again , but I find it impossible to think or write about Lost Illusions without referencing my experiences, without putting my gushing into some context,so because the book is certainly flawed if I view it dispassionately, so let me tell a little story and get it all out let my story serve as a kind of introduction When I was nineteen I met and fell for a model who lived in London Until I met her I was pretty uninterested in girls I mean obviously I liked them and all, but I wasn t crazy about them Coming from where I come from, I didn t really know that girls could be as elegant and beautiful as this particular girl TheI liked her, thetime I spent in London until I was pretty much living there For a while I enjoyed myself immensely the girl was on the cusp of success and took me to lots of parties and events I adored London I was starstruck If you re a working class kid from Sheffield and you have this gorgeous girlfriend who is fawned over everywhere, and you yourself, for being with her, are fawned over also it is difficult to maintain perspective.However, after a while things started to go awry I began to notice that the people around her, and around me, who I had trusted were actually only looking out for themselves Almost one by one I realised this The scales falling from my eyes was a painful process, so much so that I almost went down with them It was, I came to understand, impossible to have friends in London, or in those kinds of fashionable circles anyway, that the people who smiled at you were likely plotting to stab you in the back Slowly I started to pick up their habits, to become cynical and two faced and manipulative, because I thought that the only way to survive Before too long I was living in a moral vacuum, where cheap sex, drugs and social climbing were the norm It wasn t until I returned home, back to Sheffield, that I came to understand how much I had changed I lost something in London, something that, I guess, everyone loses at some point in their life What had I lost My illusions.Lucien Chardon s story arc is eerily similar to mine He is a provincial poet, who moves to Paris, thinking that he will find fame and fortune What he finds, instead, is that people in a big city will happily crawl over your carcass in the pursuit of their own wants and desires He finds that everything, and everyone, in Paris is false, even if they appear absolutely to be the opposite Lucien, like myself, is green and in the end Paris swallows him up Of course, this kind of story is not particular to me, or Lucien, but you have to credit Balzac for nailing it It shouldn t, but still does, amaze me that human beings have changed so little over hundreds of years The funny thing is that at the start of Lost Illusions I scoffed at Lucien Chardon I inwardly belittled him, judged him harshly, and, quite literally at times, rolled my eyes at him I suppose the reason for that is that not only was his story like mine, but his character also, and that embarrassed me I even put the book down two or three times, actually abandoned it, because, I realised later, I wanted to distance myself from Lucien Chardon is psychologically, emotionally, at war with himself Part of him is thoughtful, artistic, sensitive, and another part is ruthless and ambitious and self serving This is what makes Lucien human to the reader he knows what the right thing is, and feels drawn to that course of action, and yet, because he is so self obsessed, is able to convince himself that what ultimately serves his own desires is the right thing and will, in the end, produce the best results for everyone, even if he has to trample on them in the meantime This is, I would guess, why Balzac chose to call his protagonist a name that resembles the most seriously fallen, the most humanly flawed character in literature Lucifer.Structurally Lost Illusions is really clever In the beginning, Lucien plays court to Madame de Bargeton, the fashionable matriarch of Angouleme, and thinks, when he wins her, that he has done all the hard work, has won the finest victory, has raised himself to the top, only to find when they move to Paris that his victory is worthless, is nothing, and that there is a much greater,difficult, war to fight the fight to bring Paris under his heel It s a little bit like when playing a computer game and you destroy what you think is the end of level boss bad guy, only to find that actually it was just some minion and the real boss is waiting for you around the next corner and he is fucking huge What unravels after the opening section is, as noted, a tale of treachery and double dealing of Shakespearean proportions, but I do not want to linger over all that It s great, of course, but I have written plenty about it already and anywould lead to serious spoilers There are, however, numerous other fascinating ideas and themes present in the book.Perhaps the most obvious concern is that of money indeed it was Balzac s most persistent theme, the one that found its way into nearly all his work Lucien is of low birth, and so has barely a franc to his name Yet his ambitions require capital One needs money to make money One needs money to grease wheels one needs it to convince others of your worth So it goes As well as Lucien s story Balzac gives some space to David Sechard, Lucien s brother in law David enters the novel as the son of old Sechard, the bear, who is engaged in selling his printing press to his progeny for an exorbitant price David agrees, even though he knows the press isn t worth what his old man is asking for it, and ultimately ends up in a dire financial predicament Balzac, it seems to me, was torn between trying to show the evils of money, while showcasing its absolute necessity Many of the characters in Lost Illusions do horrendous things for it, yet the most kindhearted, most sympathetic suffer horribly from want of it Related to what the author has to say about money is the idea that there is a tension between art and commerce Lucien at one point in the novel has a choice to make between being an artist or journalist One will require hard work, but will lead to artistic fulfilment and perhaps fame and fortune eventually , the other will lead to quick and easy gains but artistic bankruptcy The author appears to be suggesting that it is near impossible to be an artist in a world so obsessed with money, that the lure of money will lead genius astray.The most interesting aspect of the novel, for me, is what Balzac has to say about old and new approaches In discussion of the paper business and journalism, he makes the point numerous times that things are becoming cheaper, of lesser quality Indeed, David is an inventor and he embarks on experiments in order to create a cheaper, lighter kind of paper It s not just paper either, but, Balzac points out, clothes and furniture are not as well made as they once were, will not last as long Even artwork is being downsized, madereadily available It is a kind of cheapening in step with the times, in step with the moral character of the people Even professions are not what they once were, with journalism being derided as a fully corrupt occupation, when it could, in fact, be a noble form of employment Once again, I laud Balzac s insight, his prescience, because isn t this exactly how the world is these days Everything is plastic, crap, will fall apart after a couple of days and everything is up for sale And aren t the press a bunch of talentless hyenas, who praise and condemn with one eye on their own purse As i am sure is obvious by now I passionately love Lost Illusions, but, as I mentioned earlier, it is not without flaws David, for example, is excruciating He s a complete nincompoop No matter what Lucien does he stands by him, like the craziest kind of put upon girlfriend It s fucking infuriating No one, unless sex is in the mix somewhere, is that bloody gormless, that forgiving Balzac took Dickens saintly women archetype and furnished it with a penis and even less good sense Secondly, this being a novel written in the 1800 s, and it being Balzac in particular, Lost Illusions is a melodrama So, if people constantly wringing their hands and bursting into tears every two pages over absolutely nothing grinds your gears then you might want to re think reading it The melodrama didn t bother me though, it never really does Shakespeare is melodrama too, let s not forget Finally, Lucien, we are led to believe, is a potentially great poet, even potentially a man of genius, and, well, what little of his poetry is presented to us is, uh, shit That s a bit of a problem I did wonder if Balzac was portraying Lucien as a great poet in jest, bearing in mind much of his novel is concerned with falsehood and how the least talented often prosper which Lucien did at one stage However, having read around the book a little, it does not seem as though that is the case, that Honore was in earnest about Lucien s greatness and talent, even though to my mind it would have been better had he been intentionally rubbish In any case, none of that compromised my enjoyment too much For a novel concerned with writing, with talent and greatness, it is quite apt that it is itself a work of genius


  8. Chrissie Chrissie says:

    Lost Illusions is a trilogy, consisting of 1.Two Poets 2.A Distinguished Provincial at Paris 3 ve and David Note links to the Librivox recordings are in parentheses They are to be read in this order There is little repeat of information as you pass from one book to the next Originally published separately in 1837, 1839, and 1843, they are nowadays often collect Lost Illusions is a trilogy, consisting of 1.Two Poets 2.A Distinguished Provincial at Paris 3 ve and David Note links to the Librivox recordings are in parentheses They are to be read in this order There is little repeat of information as you pass from one book to the next Originally published separately in 1837, 1839, and 1843, they are nowadays often collected into one volume with the title Lost Illusions or Illusions Perdues in French The trilogy is followed by a sequel entitled Scenes from a Courtesan s Life I will not be continuing Lost Illusions is enough for me Honor de Balzac 1799 1850 is considered one of the founders of European realism, due to his sharp observation of detail and his unfiltered representation of French society What this book does, and it does it in spades, is draw provincial and Parisian life during the post Napoleonic era, in other words France during Bourbon Restoration Events are set primarily in the 1820s, in both Paris and the town Angoul me, which is located in the Nouvelle Aquitaine region of southwestern France It details, and the details are copious, the burgeoning paper industry, the publishing trade, journalism and political machinations, as well as the world of theater and literature People of the upper class as well as those aspiring to climb the social ladder Actors and actresses, loose women and scoundrels, writers and poets are all meticulously described what they eat, what they wear and what they do The cast of characters is large If research is your thing, this book is a treasure trove, a bonanza.However, for an ordinary reader, the copious details may be considered excessive I did not need to know how to set up a printing press, or the precise fees and comparative costs of different products, or a day by day review of tasks of the trade There can in fact be too much of a good thing This will of course depend on what you are looking for On completion of the book, I felt drained and worn out I was tired of forcing myself to try and make sense of the devious characters convoluted and tricky deals I was extremely happy when the book finally came to an end Do you want the truth There it is Balzac wrote of what he knew He was a printer, a journalist and a writer The central characters of the book are too Both he and his characters had to deal with bankruptcy, misalliances and crooked deals Individuals behave duplicitly and in business corruption and wheeling and dealing is the norm What is drawn is so detailed and so realistic that one senses that that which is said is based on true events, events which the author has himself experienced In 1826 Balzac opened a printing business in Paris It went bust In 1836 he bought the newspaper La Chronique de Paris Later, in 1840 he startedLa Revue Parisienne These too were failures The version I listened to is translated by Ellen Marriage 1865 1946 The majority of the lines read well, but not all Some are clumsily expressed and there are lines the meaning of which I simply had to guess at from their context Bruce Pirie narrates the audiobook at Librivox It was pretty darn good He reads clearly and at a good speed without excessive dramatization The narration I have given three stars I will keep an eye out for this narrator at Librivox in the future The book contains tons and tons of information, and for this reason it is good that it has been written, but I found it tedious P re Goriot 4 stars The Unknown Masterpiece 4 stars Cousin Bette 3 stars Eug nie Grandet 3 stars La Rabouilleuse 3 stars Lost Illusions 2 stars Scenes from a Courtesan s Life maybe The Magic Skin maybe


  9. David Lentz David Lentz says:

    As much as I enjoyed Pere Goriot, Lost Illusions is the kind of a literary work that lets you peer into the soul of a great mind and dwell there Just as Lucien was Balzac, the lost poet, David Sechard, the printer, is also Balzac the craftsman in real life he bought a print shop in Paris to print his own novels Sechard is much like the scientist in the Quest of the Absolute, except that David ultimately finds himself through his invention and the inventor in The Quest becomes lost to his own As much as I enjoyed Pere Goriot, Lost Illusions is the kind of a literary work that lets you peer into the soul of a great mind and dwell there Just as Lucien was Balzac, the lost poet, David Sechard, the printer, is also Balzac the craftsman in real life he bought a print shop in Paris to print his own novels Sechard is much like the scientist in the Quest of the Absolute, except that David ultimately finds himself through his invention and the inventor in The Quest becomes lost to his own monomania As Balzac wrote of Lucien He s not a poet, this young man he s a serial novel And so it s time to find out what happens to Lucien after this novel in his return to Paris The characters of his novels keep reappearing in scenes from one novel to the next, which is wonderful However, they seem to change as one sees them through different eyes Delightful young Rastignac in Pere Goriot becomes a rather unscrupulous mean spirited character in Lost Illusions Balzac has built an entire society of his characters and as varied as they are, they are all also him and show the great diversity and depth of his personality and sensitivity Like Galsworthy, Balzac wanted to build an interconnected society of characters who are so human that it s easy to understand why they behave as they do The realism is striking and magnificent and always rings true Balzac works hard despite the realism to spin out of every hardship a redemption and out of every malignity a comic side that s all too human The comedy and irony are rich in Balzac in his passionate account of life in Paris in high society and the challenges that it thrusts upon every ideal This is the best work of Balzac that I have read so far out of four novels of his It s such great writing, and the energy of the translator can make a difference, that Balzac keeps one coming back forBut the writing and wit and wisdom are so extraordinary, I am happy to accommodate him Anyone who has ever aspired to write and publish prose in New York will identify with Blazac s Lucien Lost Illusions is a novel that aspiring writers especially may find intriguing


  10. Alexander Santiago Alexander Santiago says:

    Of all of Balzac s novel, Lost Illusions is my absolute fave I ve reread it about 5 times The story of a young man, the preternaturally beautiful Lucien Chardon de Rubempre , a fledgling poet who wants to escape his provincial life in the town of Angouleme, and dreams of literary success and hobknobbing with the beau monde, the wealthy, and the literati in the grand salons in the big city of Paris much like any of us who grew up in small towns and cities and dreamt of leaving for somethin Of all of Balzac s novel, Lost Illusions is my absolute fave I ve reread it about 5 times The story of a young man, the preternaturally beautiful Lucien Chardon de Rubempre , a fledgling poet who wants to escape his provincial life in the town of Angouleme, and dreams of literary success and hobknobbing with the beau monde, the wealthy, and the literati in the grand salons in the big city of Paris much like any of us who grew up in small towns and cities and dreamt of leaving for something bigger and better in the big cities Attracting the attention and amorous affections of an Angouleme provincial aristocrat, Madame de Bargeton, he achieves a modicum of success in her salon, but is subjected to a fair amount of ridicule and suspicion After being set up by his detractors that causes a scandal, he is whisked off to the big city of Paris by his paramour, only to be unceremoniously dumped and forced to eke out a meager and harsh living, shattering the illusions of his youth Little by little, Lucien s innocence of youth is stripped away as he is forced to make difficult and often bad decisions, becoming caught up in the swirl and the game of the big city, only to come away bitter and disillusioned An excellent novel that comes highly recommended


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