Troilus and Cressida MOBI ´ Troilus and ePUB í


Troilus and Cressida ❴Reading❵ ➽ Troilus and Cressida Author William Shakespeare – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk I feel that I have spent half my career with one or another Pelican Shakespeare in my back pocket Convenience, however, is the least important aspect of the new Pelican Shakespeare series Here is an e I feel that I have spent half my career with one or another Pelican Shakespeare in my back pocket Convenience, however, is the least important aspect of the new Pelican Shakespeare series Here is an elegant and clear text for either the study or the rehearsal room, notes where you Troilus and ePUB í need them and the distinguished scholarship of the general editors, Stephen Orgel and A R Braunmuller who understand that these are plays for performance as well as great texts for contemplation Patrick Stewart The distinguished Pelican Shakespeare series, which has sold than four million copies, is now completely revised and repackagedEach volume features Authoritative, reliable texts High quality introductions and notes New, readable trade trim size An essay on the theatrical world of Shakespeare and essays on Shakespeare s life and the selection of texts.

    Download Book Best Sellers in PDF format s life and the selection of texts."/>
  • Paperback
  • 192 pages
  • Troilus and Cressida
  • William Shakespeare
  • English
  • 28 January 2019
  • 0140714863

About the Author: William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare baptised April was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world s pre eminent dramatist He is often called England s national poet and the Bard of Avon or simply The Bard His surviving works consist Troilus and ePUB í of plays, sonnets, two long narrative poems, and several other poems His plays have been translated into every major living language, and are performedoften than those of any other playwrightShakespeare was born and raised in Stratford upon Avon Scholars believe that he died on his fifty second birthday, coinciding with St George s DayAt the age of he married Anne Hathaway, who bore him three children Susanna, and twins Hamnet and Judith Between and he began a successful career in London as an actor, writer, and part owner of the playing company the Lord Chamberlain s Men, later known as the King s Men He appears to have retired to Stratford around , where he died three years later Few records of Shakespeare s private life survive, and there has been considerable speculation about such matters as his sexuality, religious beliefs, and whether the works attributed to him were written by othersShakespeare produced most of his known work between and His early plays were mainly comedies and histories, genres he raised to the peak of sophistication and artistry by the end of the sixteenth century Next he wrote mainly tragedies until about , including Hamlet, King Lear, and Macbeth, considered some of the finest examples in the English language In his last phase, he wrote tragicomedies, also known as romances, and collaborated with other playwrights Many of his plays were published in editions of varying quality and accuracy during his lifetime, and in , two of his former theatrical colleagues published the First Folio, a collected edition of his dramatic works that included all but two of the plays now recognised as Shakespeare sShakespeare was a respected poet and playwright in his own day, but his reputation did not rise to its present heights until the nineteenth century The Romantics, in particular, acclaimed Shakespeare s genius, and the Victorians hero worshipped Shakespeare with a reverence that George Bernard Shaw called bardolatry In the twentieth century, his work was repeatedly adopted and rediscovered by new movements in scholarship and performance His plays remain highly popular today and are consistently performed and reinterpreted in diverse cultural and political contexts throughout the worldAccording to historians, Shakespeare wrote plays and sonnets throughout the span of his life Shakespeare s writing average was plays a year since he first started writing in There have been plays and sonnets attributed to Shakespeare that were not authentically written by the great master of language and literature.



10 thoughts on “Troilus and Cressida

  1. Bill Kerwin Bill Kerwin says:

    When I was young and naive, I loved Troilus and Cressida for its brave cynicism, but now that I am older and my outlook is bleaker I appreciate it for its realism and compassion Shakespeare shows us a world in which lovers yearn to be true and warriors strive to be brave, but both inevitably fail, betrayed by human nature and the adventitious provocations of time Here, as in Romeo and Juliet, passion and violence are inextricably linked Indeed, this later play often seems to be a dark parod When I was young and naive, I loved Troilus and Cressida for its brave cynicism, but now that I am older and my outlook is bleaker I appreciate it for its realism and compassion Shakespeare shows us a world in which lovers yearn to be true and warriors strive to be brave, but both inevitably fail, betrayed by human nature and the adventitious provocations of time Here, as in Romeo and Juliet, passion and violence are inextricably linked Indeed, this later play often seems to be a dark parody of the earlier, with Pandarus a debased version of both Nurse and Friar pimping the two young lovers, and the final tragedy resolving itself in the death not of two brave lovers but of love and bravery themselves

  2. Buck Buck says:

    It s a timeless story, really sensitive young guy gets carried away by the noble delirium of first love and goes all mushy over the dirty ho who punched his v card Complications ensue If you think my synopsis sounds crude, all I can say is, don t read Troilus and Cressida, because it gets a whole lot cruder than that For sheer nastiness, it s right up there with that other Shakespearean shocker, Titus Andronicus though without the multiple amputations and cannibalism Taking over the creak It s a timeless story, really sensitive young guy gets carried away by the noble delirium of first love and goes all mushy over the dirty ho who punched his v card Complications ensue If you think my synopsis sounds crude, all I can say is, don t read Troilus and Cressida, because it gets a whole lot cruder than that For sheer nastiness, it s right up there with that other Shakespearean shocker, Titus Andronicus though without the multiple amputations and cannibalism Taking over the creaking narrative machinery of the Trojan epic, Shakespeare reengineers it for a cynical contemporary audience scholars think the play was first performed at the Inns of Court, and there s no reason to believe that the legal profession back then was anydistinguished for its warm and fuzzy idealism than it is now As part of his programmatic revisionism, he gives us, in place of Chaucer s flower of chivalry , an ugly collection of losers, liars and mad dogs Thus, in Shakespeare s hands, Troilus becomes a romantic idiot, Cressida a whore, Achilles a mincing prima donna, Ajax a dumb jock eaten up with vanity, and on and on The only character not affected by the deflationary pressure of Shakespeare s irony is poor, doomed Hector, who fights bravely and honourably in a lost cause, and ends up getting his carcass dragged around the walls of Troy by a gloating Achilles who, in the play s most flagrant departure from the original, had sicked his Myrmidons on the unarmed Trojan.You could argue that this sceptical reading of the case is already implicit in Homer, but it s astonishing how far Shakespeare takes it, how complete the satirical inversion is It s as if he chose his source material only for the pleasure of hurling excrement at it, which he does with all the unseemly gusto of a troubled child flinging poo poo around the sandbox And it s not only the characters who get taken down a peg or two Shakespeare s satire goes much deeper than a mere lampooning of types In Troilus and Cressida, perennial human values like love, justice and honour are shown to be grotesque shams the smiling PR flunkies of the superego, employed to cover up appalling violence and sexual misconduct Lechery, lechery says Thersites, the licensed cynic of the play Still wars and lechery Nothing else holds fashion When I first read Troilus and Cressida years ago, this vein of exuberant nihilism appealed to my teenage misanthropy Na ve and inexperienced though I was, I nevertheless cherished a second hand and thoroughly ridiculous self image as a disillusioned man of the world, and I suspect that works like Troilus and Cressida helped me maintain this pose well beyond the stage of late adolescence to which it properly belonged But it s weird now that I m a little older, and have actually been deprived of a few illusions, the bitter, ranting tone of Troilus and Cressida while still amusing in its way makes me slightly uneasy Maybe it s a defensive reaction on my part, but I feel that such pessimism offers only a partial, occluded view of things The whole the world is shit so please excuse me while I drink myself to death philosophy of life is so seductive because it s obviously justified by the evidence But just because it s true doesn t mean it s correct, if you get the distinction Returning to the play, though, I d suggest that the failure of Troilus and Cressida both as drama and as philosophy is inscribed within the tragicomic mode itself By rights, tragicomedy of which Waiting for Godot would be a modern example ought to be the most complete, the most realistic form of drama, because it s able to accommodate things that pure tragedy and comedy have to keep out In practice, however, it tends to be curiously sterile and negative, incapable of affirming anything beyond its own grandiloquent world weariness Tragedy says The good man is destroyed by an indifferent universe true Comedy says The good man gets married also true Tragicomedy just says, with cheerful bad faith Let s hang ourselves immediately and goes on telling jokes

  3. Carol She& Carol She& says:

    I was so glad to select I m Finished I m no scholar, but I go to a Pop Up Shakespeare production every year in Auckland.If they offer this one, I won t be attending.Much declaiming Troilus Cressida aren t the main focus.Just shows that even the greatest writer in the English language can have an off day.Moving on I was so glad to select I m Finished I m no scholar, but I go to a Pop Up Shakespeare production every year in Auckland.If they offer this one, I won t be attending.Much declaiming Troilus Cressida aren t the main focus.Just shows that even the greatest writer in the English language can have an off day.Moving on

  4. Darwin8u Darwin8u says:

    Those wounds heal ill that men do give themselvesWilliam Shakespeare, Troilus and Cressida Troilus and Cressida is one of those Shakespeare plays that seems to have slipped through the cracks for me during my first 40 years It was a distant, dark planet I knew it existed, but couldn t give you a useful quote or discuss the plot or structure A minor Shakespeare play, perhaps Now that I ve read it, I m still a bit in the dark I ve got the basics I ve read The Iliad several times and amThose wounds heal ill that men do give themselvesWilliam Shakespeare, Troilus and Cressida Troilus and Cressida is one of those Shakespeare plays that seems to have slipped through the cracks for me during my first 40 years It was a distant, dark planet I knew it existed, but couldn t give you a useful quote or discuss the plot or structure A minor Shakespeare play, perhaps Now that I ve read it, I m still a bit in the dark I ve got the basics I ve read The Iliad several times and am familiar with most of the characters , but still need sometime banging around the text My eyes have adjusted, but I probably need to read it again or see it on stage a couple times before I could feel super comfortable with it It is messier and less lyrical than his most famous tragic love story Romeo and Juliet , but still has much to commend it It is a very modern play Its characters are challenging many of the big ideas and virtues love, rank, bravery, nobility, etc It is also a tad moralizing and homophobic and yes, I NEVER try to judge a 400 year old play by modern standards, but like The Merchant of Venice those attitudes and bigotries are still important to discuss I had never even heard of the terms brach and varlet before But like in many of Shakespeare s plays, the ugliest character is often the best I absolutely adored Thersites He outshines Cassandra His rants, rages, and insults are some of Shakespeare s sharpest His venom is epic His tongue is a hot razor One additional note of affection for this play The warriors, gathered at Troy, are an interesting group In Act 4, Scene 5, there is a fantastic dialogue between Hector and Achilles that could easily and if I was to set up this scene, this is how I d do it have been written and promoted by Don King I imagine Hector and Achilles at a table, cameras and press facing them as they peacock and throw verbal jabs and insults to the other Those lines are better trash talk than I ve seen in boxing Floyd Mayweather, Conor McGregor, and the lot needed to take a lesson from Shakespeare s trash talk factory.Favorite linesUpon my back to defend my belly upon my wit, to defend my wiles upon my secrecy, to defend mine honesty my mask, to defend my beauty and you to defend all these and at all these wards I lie, at a thousand watchesAct 1, Scene 2Men price the thing ungainedthan it isAct 1, Scene 2The raven chides blacknessAct 2, Scene 3For to be wise and love exceeds man s mightAct 3, Scene 2Both merits poised, each weighs not less norBut he as he, the heavier for a whoreAct 4, Scene 2What s past and what s to come is strewed with husksAnd formless ruin of oblivionAct 4, Scene 5But still sweet love is food for fortune s toothAct 5, Scene 1Why are thou then exasperate, thou idleimmaterial skein of sleave silk, thou green sarcent flapfor a sore eye, though tassel of a prodigal s purse, thou Ah, how the poor world is pestered with such waterflies, diminutives of natureAct 5 Scene 1Lechery, lechery, stillwars and lechery nothing else holds fashionAct 5, Scene 2I think they have swallowedone another I would laugh at that miracle yet, Iin a sort, lechery eats itselfAct 5, Scene 4I am a bastard, too I love bastards I am bastard begot, bastard instructed, bastard in mind, bastard in valor, in everything illegitimateAct 5, Scene 7Farewell, bastardAct 5, Scene 7 varlet as a homosexual insult also appears in Measure for Measure King Lear Both plays were written around the time of TC

  5. Daniel Chaikin Daniel Chaikin says:

    One of Shakespeare s problem plays because, well, for one, it s really difficult, but mainly because it s comedy but not really Actually it s a very cynical comedy Troilus and Cressida is long, generates a lot of confusion and frustration and has a limited stage history, but it s complicated in interesting ways, and, in the right mindset, very rewarding I read this over five weekends with a group on Litsy, our 5th Shakespeare of 2019, not bad I had force through it a little, but ultimate One of Shakespeare s problem plays because, well, for one, it s really difficult, but mainly because it s comedy but not really Actually it s a very cynical comedy Troilus and Cressida is long, generates a lot of confusion and frustration and has a limited stage history, but it s complicated in interesting ways, and, in the right mindset, very rewarding I read this over five weekends with a group on Litsy, our 5th Shakespeare of 2019, not bad I had force through it a little, but ultimately I enjoyed it quite a bit.Shakespeare pulls from the Chaucer s Troilus and Criseyde, which pulled off the medieval tradition when Homer s texts were lost, and other literary traditions evolved from it The Iliad s Briseis, the captive Achilles had to give up to Agamemnon, setting up the Iliad s main story, has been transformed into a Trojan princess, Cressida, who is traded to the Greeks for a warriorbut only after falling in love with one of sons of Trojan king Priam, Troilus Shakespeare also would have pulled off of George Chapman s translation of the Iliad in 1598 Familiarity with the The Iliad helped me pick up a lot of the humor.This is a comedy with a hard cynical perspective on Homer, and also on power, war and romance Every famous Homeric character from the Iliad is here dressed down and often exposed as fraud Achilles, for example, doesn t leave off in isolation, but hides in his tent, on stage, leaving Patroclus at the entrance to say he isn t there when the embassy Iliad Chapter 9 shows up He also has others take down Hector while he watches and then takes credit There are many things that make this play work The most brilliant, by the bard, was maybe the conversion of Thersites Homer s version of Thersites is only in one brief scene where he complains to his fellow Greeks about the ridiculous war, then nine years old, and is put in his place by Odysseus He became the standard of the bad soldier throughout the classical tradition Here Thersites is converted into a Shakespearean fool, mocking every other character in clever and often hilarious ways, and providing a signpost to the audience or reader of the cynical perspective intended Lechery, lechery, still wars and lechery, nothing else holds fashion, he sums for us Then there s Troilus, with a youthful romantic idealism and a devout love of Cressida, and many beautiful lines, and Panderus, the uncle of Cressida, who views himself as a woe begotten pimp, and provides the origin of our word pander But the best character, for me, is Cressida, who plays a different role in every scene Here mocking Troilus s romantic notions while giving advice for women to hold out on the sex, because for men Achievement is command, ungained, beseech Then, next she is wooing Troilus, then, once in the Greek camp, she quickly adjusts, smartly handling all the main Greeks in one scene, and working over the Greek she s been given to, Troilus s opposite, the crude, unromantic and sexually explicit Diomedes A lot of the readers in our group all women, I am the only male found the treatment of Cressida and other women horrendous They re treated as property, and suffer with no control or value as human But, it s the setting that allows Cressida to evolve into a character worth some reflection and admiration Pitiful me, I dwelt on the latter.This was supposed to be a brief review, but got a little out of hand Apologies for the length I gave this five stars, recommended for the brave 33 The History of Troilus and Cressida by William Shakespeareeditor Jonathan V Crewepublished Dated 1601 2, registered 1603, this edition from 2000format 156 page Pelican Shakespeare paperback.acquired Libraryread Jun 22 Jul 20mtime reading 8 hr 36 min, 3.3 min pagerating 5

  6. Constantina Maud Constantina Maud says:

    Being a devoted fan of the Bard, it really pains me to rate this play so low Yet let me elaborate a bit.This play was never really on my to be read list However, I stumbled across a reference to it while reading Woolf s A Room of One s Own you know, in the serendipitous kind of way in which you go to your favourite Korean restaurant and for a serving of bibimbap you get a delicious bowl of miso soup for free as well.Well, after reading Troilus and Cressida, let s just say it is indeed a probl Being a devoted fan of the Bard, it really pains me to rate this play so low Yet let me elaborate a bit.This play was never really on my to be read list However, I stumbled across a reference to it while reading Woolf s A Room of One s Own you know, in the serendipitous kind of way in which you go to your favourite Korean restaurant and for a serving of bibimbap you get a delicious bowl of miso soup for free as well.Well, after reading Troilus and Cressida, let s just say it is indeed a problem play link There can never be a work of the Bard though without a memorable aphorism And credits to Patroclus for this oneThese wounds heal ill that men do give themselves

  7. Roy Lotz Roy Lotz says:

    This is a rather difficult Shakespeare play to evaluate Its genre is a problem neither a comedy, nor a tragedy, nor even a tragicomedy it leaves an ambiguous emotional aftertaste on the palate Shakespeare himself seems to have felt ambivalent about the work, since he never staged it Harold Bloom speculates that this was because the play is simply too openly nihilistic.Shakespeare makes sport of all of the illusions of his day and ours Achilles, the glorious soldier, is a coward Hector, t This is a rather difficult Shakespeare play to evaluate Its genre is a problem neither a comedy, nor a tragedy, nor even a tragicomedy it leaves an ambiguous emotional aftertaste on the palate Shakespeare himself seems to have felt ambivalent about the work, since he never staged it Harold Bloom speculates that this was because the play is simply too openly nihilistic.Shakespeare makes sport of all of the illusions of his day and ours Achilles, the glorious soldier, is a coward Hector, the honorable leader, is a vain fool Troilus, the ardent lover, is merely lustful Cressida, the lovesick heroine, is inconstant Ulysses, the quintessential politician, is completely without scruple The only sane person in the play is the fool Thersites, who is full of intense bitterness towards everyone around him Shakespeare, perhaps in an attempt to emulate the mood of antique literature, is very sparring of his immense talent for creating deep characters None of the characters in the play is particularly interesting or memorable they wear their personalities on the surface, like their armor The dialogue, too, is not scrupulously in character, but rather a kind of elevated poetry that everybody speaks Consequently, as Bloom points out, there are many excellent lines scattered about, but it is difficult to see any of them as the emanation of a fictional personality.The fifth act strikes me as having been written in a kind of deflated haste, perhaps after Shakespeare realized that the play would not work on the stage It is rushed off in a flash of combat, none of which has much emotional import As it stands, then, this play is primarily interesting for being evidence of Shakespeare s own nihilism regarding love, glory, and power

  8. Amber Amber says:

    beware Those wounds heal ill that men do give themselves.Minds sway d by eyes are full of turpitude.Why should a man be proud How doth pride grow I know not what it is.He that is proud eats up himself pride is his own glass, his own trumpet, his own chronicle, and whatever praises itself but in the deed, devours the deed in the praisenought that knows not this Men prize the thing ungainedthan it is That she was never yet that ever knew Love got so sweet as w beware Those wounds heal ill that men do give themselves.Minds sway d by eyes are full of turpitude.Why should a man be proud How doth pride grow I know not what it is.He that is proud eats up himself pride is his own glass, his own trumpet, his own chronicle, and whatever praises itself but in the deed, devours the deed in the praisenought that knows not this Men prize the thing ungainedthan it is That she was never yet that ever knew Love got so sweet as when desire did sue Therefore this maxim out of love I teach Achievement is command ungained, beseech That though my heart s contents firm love doth bear, Nothing of that shall from mine eyes appear

  9. Nick Smith Nick Smith says:

    So a lot of people seem to think this is really boring and difficult I ll give them the second one, but boring This tale of a tangential romance if you can call it that to the Trojan War is rife with all kinds of awesome feats du language oh yeah, I wrote that and lots of tiny but cool moments, as various celebrated heroes find themselves unable to escape the narratives we know them for, despite their and Shakespeare s best efforts From the rather peaceful, almost wistful beginning to So a lot of people seem to think this is really boring and difficult I ll give them the second one, but boring This tale of a tangential romance if you can call it that to the Trojan War is rife with all kinds of awesome feats du language oh yeah, I wrote that and lots of tiny but cool moments, as various celebrated heroes find themselves unable to escape the narratives we know them for, despite their and Shakespeare s best efforts From the rather peaceful, almost wistful beginning to the end, which is basically a huge fuck you to the audience, this is a master study of how things love, war, society fall apart Maddening and incredible

  10. Meredith Holley Meredith Holley says:

    My roommate in college was film noir s 1 fan, and we went through a long period of time trying to get caught up on every noir ever made It was in that mood that said roommate and I took one of my favorite college classes, which we affectionately called Shakespeare Boot Camp The two week long class consisted of a week of studying plays and a week of living in Ashland, Oregon while going to see those plays on stage at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival Brilliant I was really psyched up to see th My roommate in college was film noir s 1 fan, and we went through a long period of time trying to get caught up on every noir ever made It was in that mood that said roommate and I took one of my favorite college classes, which we affectionately called Shakespeare Boot Camp The two week long class consisted of a week of studying plays and a week of living in Ashland, Oregon while going to see those plays on stage at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival Brilliant I was really psyched up to see the stage performance of Troilus and Cressida, because I had decided that it was film noir from start to finish.Unfortunately, the director of the production we saw decided that Cressida was pretty much the Greek equivalent of a misunderstood vapid cheerleader Sucks how Shakespeare is so open to interpretation like that In my mind she was the ultimate femme fatale the mastermind behind the betrayals that are the essence of this story To the director of that production, she was the pawn of the big, strong gay men In all fairness, that production focused on the relationship between Patroclus and Achilles, and the actual story of Troilus and Cressida was almost incidental When Cressida was on stage, however, she pranced around in her golden locks until blood was practically pouring out of my ears I took it personally If we re going to write a female stereotype, I prefer the villain to the idiot At least the villain has some power.When we returned from Shakespeare Camp I decided to adopt a black cat and name her Cressida as Ava Gardner s Character Kitty Collins in The Killers , so that when people met her they would know that Cressida is e vil That s exactly what I did Ironically, Cat Cressida is kind of cuddly and sweet it turns out, and she makes friends with all the neighbors But I think deep down she has betrayal in her heart She s just waiting for the right moment to spring it on us Anyway, spread the word people Cressida may be a bitch, but she ain t nobody else s bitch, ya know

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