!!> PDF / Epub ☆ Advice Not Given: A Guide to Getting Over Yourself ✪ Author Mark Epstein – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk



10 thoughts on “Advice Not Given: A Guide to Getting Over Yourself

  1. says:

    The title immediately intrigued me Instead of a perhapsgentle of diplomatic way of phrasing it, it s a get over yourself message which is sometimes necessary So it seemed like this could be an intriguing read.The author uses a mix of Buddhist teachings combined with Western therapy to aid his patients and to provide guidance but no quick solutions to the reader It s also speckled with stories of his patients and their interactions Honestly, the book was incredibly boring Another r The title immediately intrigued me Instead of a perhapsgentle of diplomatic way of phrasing it, it s a get over yourself message which is sometimes necessary So it seemed like this could be an intriguing read.The author uses a mix of Buddhist teachings combined with Western therapy to aid his patients and to provide guidance but no quick solutions to the reader It s also speckled with stories of his patients and their interactions Honestly, the book was incredibly boring Another reviewer notes that havingthan basic knowledge of Buddhism would help and I agree Another review also talks about how Wilhelm Reich had a patient lie naked and said he d teach her how to flirt Not an expert on therapy or Reich but after looking him up I found that he had been suspected of being sexually abused as a child and seemed to have an unusual interest in sex and childhood sexuality Children were made to stand naked in front of him as part of therapy and they had described as being sexually abused by Reich s colleagues, although not Reich himself I understand that none of this is part of Epstein s goal in writing the book but I found it bizarre that he d talk about Reich and teaching a patient how to flirt without discussing the allegations and or that learning how to flirt seems like an unusual part of therapy and what does it have to do with Buddhism.As you can see, this book just gets a side eye from me I guess that s what I get for picking up a book based on the title alone Skip it


  2. says:

    This is a wonderful book that gave me a lot to ponder If you are interested at all in Buddhism and how to apply the practices of meditation and mindfulness to the challenges of everyday life, this is one not to miss.


  3. says:

    The book is a mixture of freudian psychotherapy and buddhism I love the concept and I learned a lot It s a short book and it s not as scientific as Robert Wright s Why Buddhism is True or as practical as some of the other guides like Zinn s or Radical Acceptance But it s good.


  4. says:

    Beautiful book The view of the ego and mindfulness presented here is extremely practical and easy to follow and understand According to Mark Epstein, the ego is not something that we need to eradicate rather, it s something that we need to mold and learn to harness The book offers a mix of psychotherapy and Buddhist practices that can help us lead better lives The book is divided into sections that cover the 8 fold path to enlightenment 1 Right view a balanced complete view of everythin Beautiful book The view of the ego and mindfulness presented here is extremely practical and easy to follow and understand According to Mark Epstein, the ego is not something that we need to eradicate rather, it s something that we need to mold and learn to harness The book offers a mix of psychotherapy and Buddhist practices that can help us lead better lives The book is divided into sections that cover the 8 fold path to enlightenment 1 Right view a balanced complete view of everything 2 Right motivation apply your intellect to life, not impulse3 Right speech intervene between thought and action4 Right action mobilise your power of restraint 5 Right livelihood avoid the worst qualities of humanity 6 Right effort find balance 7 Right mindfulness keep an eye on yourself 8 Right concentration focus on the ocean not the wavesI added a little note to highlight an idea explored in each path The book goes way deeper on the points with support from Freudian psychology, stories drawn from the author s personal experiences, clients and from Buddhist teaching etc I love how short the book is with such a refreshing and relaxed approach to mindfulness


  5. says:

    This one was a little hard for me to get into since it wasn tbroadly applicable, although it was a quick read with some insights food for thought.Takeaways Meditation is a temporary alleviation of anxiety pain that doesn t dictate how at peace one will be in their moment of death a truthful response may not be a zen one Learn the backward step that turns your light inward to illuminate yourself Japanese Buddhist phrase 8 worldly concerns according to the Buddha 1 gain 2 loss 3 This one was a little hard for me to get into since it wasn tbroadly applicable, although it was a quick read with some insights food for thought.Takeaways Meditation is a temporary alleviation of anxiety pain that doesn t dictate how at peace one will be in their moment of death a truthful response may not be a zen one Learn the backward step that turns your light inward to illuminate yourself Japanese Buddhist phrase 8 worldly concerns according to the Buddha 1 gain 2 loss 3 pleasure 4 pain 5.praise 6 blame 7 fame 8 disgrace We take what is good from our parents and leave the rest That s how we honor them Bruce Springsteen Mindfulness isn t a way of life, but an introductory technique meant to be expanded upon and not used as a crutch to avoid conflict or connection


  6. says:

    The author provides his take on the Buddhist eight fold path to enlightenment, informed by his traditional psychological training I found his friendly discussion an interesting way to learn about the path to enlightenment, with stories that soundlike they are out of the pop psychology books I am familiar with I will look foron this topic, and would positively consider books by Epstein.


  7. says:

    I received Advice Not Given by Mark Epstein for free through Goodreads Giveaways program.Epstein, a psychiatrist and a Buddhist, explains Buddhism s Eightfold Path within the context of psychotherapy It s an interesting idea Buddhism does say that life is suffering, and when do people usually go to see a psychiatrist When they are suffering.I have almost no knowledge of Buddhism, and I think some knowledge would have been helpful My guess is that this book is for those who have a greater un I received Advice Not Given by Mark Epstein for free through Goodreads Giveaways program.Epstein, a psychiatrist and a Buddhist, explains Buddhism s Eightfold Path within the context of psychotherapy It s an interesting idea Buddhism does say that life is suffering, and when do people usually go to see a psychiatrist When they are suffering.I have almost no knowledge of Buddhism, and I think some knowledge would have been helpful My guess is that this book is for those who have a greater understanding of the religion That being said, I did learn a bit about the thought process in Buddhism and how that could be applied to psychotherapy.I thought the book was strongest when Epstein discussed specific patients and how their problems, questions, etc mixed both Buddhism and psychotherapy All in all, this was an interesting read I think knowledge about Buddhism would be helpful going in


  8. says:

    Understanding the eight fold path is not easy endeavor, especially when considering enlightenment from a western s perspective Mark Epstein uses his past experiences, his practice, and intimate stories to well illustrates full round learning which includes moments of growth and moments of tripping along the way He also reflects on how his career psychiatry parallels with Buddhism our live may feel like many individual paths but after years they can been seen as all flowing together.Epstein Understanding the eight fold path is not easy endeavor, especially when considering enlightenment from a western s perspective Mark Epstein uses his past experiences, his practice, and intimate stories to well illustrates full round learning which includes moments of growth and moments of tripping along the way He also reflects on how his career psychiatry parallels with Buddhism our live may feel like many individual paths but after years they can been seen as all flowing together.Epstein is able to share eastern wisdom to a western world I enjoyed it as a fluid narrative, but one could easily go back and re read individual chapters to gain momentary insight too


  9. says:

    I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway I really enjoyed it I have read two of Mark Epstein s other books and have listened to him on podcasts etc so I was familiar with his background coming into it I liked how the books focus on the ego was centered around the eightfold path I always appreciate plenty of examples and interpretations of ancient Buddhist texts especially from someone I respect I like hearing about DW Winnicot and his theories but don t necessarily want to read him dire I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway I really enjoyed it I have read two of Mark Epstein s other books and have listened to him on podcasts etc so I was familiar with his background coming into it I liked how the books focus on the ego was centered around the eightfold path I always appreciate plenty of examples and interpretations of ancient Buddhist texts especially from someone I respect I like hearing about DW Winnicot and his theories but don t necessarily want to read him directly I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys Buddhist psychology and follows the dharma.Highlights for me were the chapters on Right Mindfulness and Right Concentration


  10. says:

    A nice book, but I found the title a bit misleading.


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Advice Not Given: A Guide to Getting Over Yourself Most People Will Never Find A Great Psychiatrist Or A Great Buddhist Teacher, But Mark Epstein Is Both, And The Wisdom He Imparts In Advice Not Given Is An Act Of Generosity And Compassion The Book Is A Tonic For The Ailments Of Our Time Ann Patchett, New York Times Bestselling Author Of Commonwealth Our Ego, And Its Accompanying Sense Of Nagging Self Doubt As We Work To Be Bigger, Better, Smarter, And In Control, Is One Affliction We All Share And While Our Ego Claims To Have Our Best Interests At Heart, In Its Never Ending Pursuit Of Attention And Power, It Sabotages The Very Goals It Sets To Achieve In Advice Not Given, Renowned Psychiatrist And Author Dr Mark Epstein Reveals How Buddhism And Western Psychotherapy, Two Traditions That Developed In Entirely Different Times And Places And, Until Recently, Had Nothing To Do With Each Other, Both Identify The Ego As The Limiting Factor In Our Well Being, And Both Come To The Same Conclusion When We Give The Ego Free Rein, We Suffer But When It Learns To Let Go, We Are FreeWith Great Insight, And In A Deeply Personal Style, Epstein Offers Readers A How To Guide That Refuses A Quick Fix, Grounded In Two Traditions Devoted To Maximizing The Human Potential For Living A Better Life Using The Eightfold Path, Eight Areas Of Self Reflection That Buddhists Believe Necessary For Enlightenment, As His Scaffolding, Epstein Looks Back Productively On His Own Experience And That Of His Patients While The Ideas Of The Eightfold Path Are As Old As Buddhism Itself, When Informed By The Sensibility Of Western Psychotherapy, They Become Something A Road Map For Spiritual And Psychological Growth, A Way Of Dealing With The Intractable Problem Of The Ego Breaking Down The Wall Between East And West, Epstein Brings A Buddhist Sensibility To Therapy And A Therapist S Practicality To Buddhism Speaking Clearly And Directly, He Offers A Rethinking Of Mindfulness That Encourages People To Be Watchful Of Their Ego, An Idea With A Strong Foothold In Buddhism But Now For The First Time Applied In The Context Of PsychotherapyOur Ego Is At Once Our Biggest Obstacle And Our Greatest Hope We Can Be At Its Mercy Or We Can Learn To Mold It Completely Unique And Practical, Epstein S Advice Can Be Used By All Each In His Or Her Own Way And Will Provide Wise Counsel In A Confusing World After All, As He Says, Our Egos Can Use All The Help They Can Get