Good Book: The Bizarre, Hilarious, Disturbing, Marvelous,

Good Book: The Bizarre, Hilarious, Disturbing, Marvelous, and Inspiring Things I Learned When I Read Every Single Word of the Bible [Reading] ➸ Good Book: The Bizarre, Hilarious, Disturbing, Marvelous, and Inspiring Things I Learned When I Read Every Single Word of the Bible ➮ David Plotz – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Hilarious It s Cliff Notes for Scripture screenplay by Plotz, story by God In the end, though, the book is made by the spirit of the writer The New York Times Book Review Like the Bible itself, Good B Hilarious It The Bizarre, Epub Ü s Cliff Notes for Scripture screenplay by Plotz, story by God In the end, though, the book is made by the spirit of the writer The New York Times Book Review Like the Bible itself, Good Book contains multitudes it is by turns thought provoking, funny, enlightening and moving A J Jacobs, author of The Year of Living Biblically Plotz is a genius writer Franklin Foer, author of Good Book: PDF/EPUB or How Soccer Explains the WorldA whip smart, laugh out loud tour through the most important book in the world, a book most people have never read the Bible.


About the Author: David Plotz

Plotz, an The Bizarre, Epub Ü American journalist, has been a writer with Slate since its inception and was designated as the online magazine s editor in June He is the author of The Genius Factory The Curious History of the Nobel Prize Sperm Bank and Good Book The Bizarre, Hilarious, Disturbing, Marvelous, and Inspiring Things I Learned when I Read Every Single Word of the Bible .



10 thoughts on “Good Book: The Bizarre, Hilarious, Disturbing, Marvelous, and Inspiring Things I Learned When I Read Every Single Word of the Bible

  1. David David says:

    This is a fascinating, irreverent book that that summarizes the Bible, chapter by chapter Oh, some chapters are bypassed, because in the words of David Plotz, it is boring The last chapter stands out as the most interesting, as the author asks the question, Should you read the Bible The first reason is that so much of Western culture comes from the Bible Plotz writes that it is difficult to get through a chapter even a chapter in some obscure book without encountering a phrase, a name This is a fascinating, irreverent book that that summarizes the Bible, chapter by chapter Oh, some chapters are bypassed, because in the words of David Plotz, it is boring The last chapter stands out as the most interesting, as the author asks the question, Should you read the Bible The first reason is that so much of Western culture comes from the Bible Plotz writes that it is difficult to get through a chapter even a chapter in some obscure book without encountering a phrase, a name, a character, or an idea that has come down to us from 3,000 years ago So many plot twists and fundamental ideas come to us from the Bible And, throughout the book, Plotz reminds readers when a particular chapter contains these fundamental ideas, names, or phrases The second reason for reading the Bible is to understand religious traditions even traditions with which one does not agree.After reading the Bible, it is difficult to answer the question, Why believe in a God that is unjust, merciless, unforgiving, and unloving That question comes up because the God described in the Bible is all those things And besides, God is fickle and inconsistent So much of the Bible is filled with barbaric concepts and commandments at least by today s standards These barbaric acts were probably commonplace in their own time But then, how can we possibly say that the concept of a God makes moral laws absolute I have never read the Bible in full I guess I only have read the Sunday School portions For example, in the Book of Esther, I thought that the book ended when the evil Haman was killed But I do not recall that later, Esther persuaded the king to allow an extra day for a killing spree against the Jews enemies I never realized that Lot s daughters got their father drunk in order to commit incest In Leviticus, God killed Aaron s sons because they used the wrong type of incense And, if you have a disobedient son, you can take him to the elders of the town and have him stoned to death.This book, by recounting some of the inconsistencies in the Bible s precepts, is quite hilarious David Plotz tries to get to the bottom of some of the motivations of the characters For example, when God causes the ten plagues on the Pharoah, when you get down to it, the reason for the plagues is that God wanted us to tell stories about them Plotz wonders why, when the Israelites were wandering through the desert for forty years, they were in constant rebellion After all, didn t they recall all the amazing miracles that were happening all that time In many of the chapters, Plotz shows how God hates brothers, detests women, but loves bald people God likes carnivores, but not vegetarians To get a flavor for the book, I offer this quote from the section on Chapter 16 of Ezekiel, This chapter is like the bad parts of Portrait of a Lady, Madame Bovary, and Married with Children all rolled up into a ball of rage It s the first story to correctly understand that the psychological relationship between God and His people is not parent and child, but spousesReturning to the question of why God would act like this, Plotz mentions the usual answer that God acts in mysterious ways But, he points out that we were born as rational beings If God made us, giving us the tools to think, then we must examine God with rational and moral inquiry And He fails that examination


  2. Eris Eris says:

    David Plotz, a secular Jew, discovers a horrifying story while browsing the Old Testament in a fit of boredom during an infrequent visit to a Temple service So horrifying that he is compelled to pick up the Book and read the whole thing to see what other horrors he has missed This book is a chapter by chapter mostly synopsis of the Old Testament, with commentary and some biting observations I found his play by play color commentary to be insightful at times, and did very much enjoy this wor David Plotz, a secular Jew, discovers a horrifying story while browsing the Old Testament in a fit of boredom during an infrequent visit to a Temple service So horrifying that he is compelled to pick up the Book and read the whole thing to see what other horrors he has missed This book is a chapter by chapter mostly synopsis of the Old Testament, with commentary and some biting observations I found his play by play color commentary to be insightful at times, and did very much enjoy this work I DON T recommend this for the savagely pious in any faith, it WILL piss them off Fence sitters beware, this one might knock you off the fence, and not in the direction you think


  3. Daniel Daniel says:

    An ignorant Jewish writer decided to read the Tanakh Jewish Bible for the first time and write about the experience book by book Billed as hilarious and inspiring it isn t much of either in large part because of the lack of any real Jewish knowledge by the author He reads Psalm 118 and says, I don t think this psalm has much sway over Jews unaware that it is part of the Hallel service that is part of every holiday service and then skips over Psalm 145 Ashrei which is read three ti An ignorant Jewish writer decided to read the Tanakh Jewish Bible for the first time and write about the experience book by book Billed as hilarious and inspiring it isn t much of either in large part because of the lack of any real Jewish knowledge by the author He reads Psalm 118 and says, I don t think this psalm has much sway over Jews unaware that it is part of the Hallel service that is part of every holiday service and then skips over Psalm 145 Ashrei which is read three times a day, every day, in Jewish prayer services It is that complete lack of knowledge that makes his discussion hilarious but only in the sense of being laughable, as when he introduces the Book of Deuteronomy by calling it obscure adding, that he has never heard anyone recite Deuteronomy in the synagogue By chapter 6 he s admitting he was wrong when he discovers the Shema there.Perhaps as a sequel he could read other texts he knows nothing about and share his ignorance on those I ve never heard anyone mention the Sixth Amendment


  4. Lee Harmon Lee Harmon says:

    100% recommended This romp through the Hebrew Bible is muchthan just fascinating and funny It s also engrossing, mildly irreverent, thought provoking, disturbing you ll love the Good Book whether you re a believer or not This is the Bible unveiled in all its grime and greatness The characters in Genesis are especially unforgettable, from the story of Abimalech lusting after a 90 year old woman Sarah, Abraham s wife to a diabolical mother and son plot to rob the simple minded Esau of 100% recommended This romp through the Hebrew Bible is muchthan just fascinating and funny It s also engrossing, mildly irreverent, thought provoking, disturbing you ll love the Good Book whether you re a believer or not This is the Bible unveiled in all its grime and greatness The characters in Genesis are especially unforgettable, from the story of Abimalech lusting after a 90 year old woman Sarah, Abraham s wife to a diabolical mother and son plot to rob the simple minded Esau of his blessing from an over trusting father.Book by book, Plotz takes us through the scripture If Genesis is the best part, then the appendix runs a close second There you ll learn the Bible s twelve best pick up lines, the thirteen most spectacular murders, the nine best parties, the best prostitutes, the most hellacious divine punishment, the trippiest dreams, and .This is for all you skeptics who think reading the Bible is a waste of time Plotz apparently thought the same thing before taking on this project After thirty nine books, 929 chapters,than 600,000 words, and just over a year, Plotz admits he s become a full on Bible thumper Everyone should read it all of it In fact, the less you believe, theyou should read Start with this book as an introduction to get the juices flowing Plotz isthan a good researcher, he s a great writer I m in awe I could enthusiastically read anything he writes, I m sure of it So, when he tackles a topic already fascinating to me the Bible it s pure delight He s also unfortunately a Jew, which means we only get the Old Testament in his Good Book Please, David, can t you give Billy Graham a listen


  5. Corey Edwards Corey Edwards says:

    Not quite the book I was hoping for but an interesting read none the less Further, the book illustrates a contradiction that has perplexed me for years faith despite wisdom.The author is a self described faithful Jew whose rather shaky faith was greatly strengthened by reading every word of the bible This despite the fact that doing so caused him to write a book that very gently but also thoroughly pokes holes both great and small in the fabric of the text throughout, leaving a tattered m Not quite the book I was hoping for but an interesting read none the less Further, the book illustrates a contradiction that has perplexed me for years faith despite wisdom.The author is a self described faithful Jew whose rather shaky faith was greatly strengthened by reading every word of the bible This despite the fact that doing so caused him to write a book that very gently but also thoroughly pokes holes both great and small in the fabric of the text throughout, leaving a tattered mess in his wake How capricious and vicious is the god described, how sexually obsessed, violent, and ridiculous are the characters, how contradictory, disturbing, derivative, and utterly unbelievable the stories are.How anyone with the ability to see through this mess of poorly concocted fables could come away from the book with their faith strengthened is beyond me Fascinating are the illusions of man s need


  6. Joseph Rizzo Joseph Rizzo says:

    What I enjoyed about this book Seeing this through the eyes of a non christian He actually takes the time to read the OT The things that caught his attention were interesting.What I didn t enjoy Taking some of the OT narrative wildly out of context and reducing the actions of Almighty God to a petty, vindictive, and unjustly punitive God It is unfortunate, but I know he is not the only one who sees it this way It is his misunderstanding of human nature and the requisite judicial actions of G What I enjoyed about this book Seeing this through the eyes of a non christian He actually takes the time to read the OT The things that caught his attention were interesting.What I didn t enjoy Taking some of the OT narrative wildly out of context and reducing the actions of Almighty God to a petty, vindictive, and unjustly punitive God It is unfortunate, but I know he is not the only one who sees it this way It is his misunderstanding of human nature and the requisite judicial actions of God


  7. Jay Glickman Jay Glickman says:

    Have I mentioned my profound contempt and loathing of religious fundamentalists Probably I was reminded today of the staggering loopiness of these right wingnuts when Bobo Smyth Bullard sent me a clipping concerning a fundamentalist s response to the late unpleasantness at Sea World, in which Shamu the Killer Whale lived up to his description and iced one of his trainers Said response was swift and merciless according to scripture, Shamu must be killed forthwith via stoning How do you Have I mentioned my profound contempt and loathing of religious fundamentalists Probably I was reminded today of the staggering loopiness of these right wingnuts when Bobo Smyth Bullard sent me a clipping concerning a fundamentalist s response to the late unpleasantness at Sea World, in which Shamu the Killer Whale lived up to his description and iced one of his trainers Said response was swift and merciless according to scripture, Shamu must be killed forthwith via stoning How do you stone to death something that lives underwater Also, his surviving trainers must likewise be stoned to death for good measure, says the Bible As often claimed, the Good Book has a solution for every problem, even if most of them involving throwing rocks at people or aquatic mammals.I mention this as an introduction to a delightful book by David Plotz, the editor of Slate, in which he describes, chapter by chapter, his experience reading the whole of the Old Testament Like myself, Plotz is a mostly non observant Jew neither of us has much interest in the events that follow The result is an informative, thoughtful, and very, very funny look at the Good Book s many contradictions, acts of violence, pornographic interludes, and refreshing bits of fine poetry.Seriously, though the Old Testament which includes the five books of the Torah, plus a bunch of books about Prophets, Judges, Psalms, and a poor bastard named Job , is completely whacked Some of theoutlandish incidents involve golden hemorrhoids, a mountain of foreskins, killing a thousand people with a donkey s jawbone, the genocide of a dozen orsocieties, and an almost endless number of hookers Any fundie who claims to literally believe everything in here is unquestionably certifiable.Its not all hookers and hemorrhoids, though Plotz s evaluation of the Bible, while frequently snarky, is also frequently thoughtful and respectful His chief problem seems to lie in reconciling the notion of a loving and merciful God with the psychotically jealous and angry deity that informs most of the Bible s events And it is a tough problem frankly God s actions throughout tend to make lowly humans seem like paragons of virtue and sanity Much of the wackiness of fundamentalism must come from trying to integrate the bitchy, vengeful God of the Old Testament with the cuddly, loving God of the Jesus era In my opinion, fundies would save themselves a lot of needless anxiety by simply stipulating that God had a stroke sometime around 50 BC, and afterward had a whole different personality Anyway, Plotz is at his best when he tries to resolve the violence, misogyny, and chaos of the Bible by applying his own personal interpretations of the text simultaneously perplexed, humorous and humane, he demonstrates that taking anything in the book literally is the worst possible move Ultimately, he advises his readers to do the work themselves read the book, and work through the many contradictions on their own, and, as he did, find themselves deriving new inspiration from the process I plan to start soon, and will post a review of the Good Book in due course


  8. Chris Chris says:

    Because I grew up in a religious environment, I find secular views on the bible interesting David Plotz made the choice to read his Jewish Bible for the first time This was a new experience for him as he had forgotten most of the things he learned in Hebrew School David writes this book in a chapter by chapter approach the reader can see his understanding grow and his reactions change throughout the book Many of his musings are notable, but two stand out his acceptable name list and his re Because I grew up in a religious environment, I find secular views on the bible interesting David Plotz made the choice to read his Jewish Bible for the first time This was a new experience for him as he had forgotten most of the things he learned in Hebrew School David writes this book in a chapter by chapter approach the reader can see his understanding grow and his reactions change throughout the book Many of his musings are notable, but two stand out his acceptable name list and his realization that God loves those who think rather than follow blindly.Mr Plotz discovers that the favorite people of God from the Bible, Abraham, Moses, David, Jacob, Elijah, etc., all argue, negotiate, make demands of God, and remind Him of His covenants The God of the Bible does not like the automatrons, that blindly follow like sheep I can see Yahweh saying, I created you with free will, Me Dammit, so you better use it


  9. Grumpus Grumpus says:

    I enjoyed the slightly irreverent look at his chapter by chapter reading of the Old Testament Each Biblical chapter of significance his opinion is addressed through a brief summary of what is happening in everyday language and his humorous lens It will shed new light on all those biblical stories you ve heard about since you were a child The appendix was especially interesting as it was a synopsis of useful and not so useful Bible lists You never really knew what was in the Bible until I enjoyed the slightly irreverent look at his chapter by chapter reading of the Old Testament Each Biblical chapter of significance his opinion is addressed through a brief summary of what is happening in everyday language and his humorous lens It will shed new light on all those biblical stories you ve heard about since you were a child The appendix was especially interesting as it was a synopsis of useful and not so useful Bible lists You never really knew what was in the Bible until you read listen to this take on it Finally, kudos to the author on doing a great job of narrating the book himself


  10. Natali Natali says:

    One of the funniest books I ve ever read I loved it Good Book is a summary of the Old Testament, told by David Plotz, an editor for Slate Magazine It is his sincere effort to better understand the bible but his compendium is sarcastic, sardonic, and hilarious I enjoyed the first half a lotthan I enjoyed the second half but that is not really Plotz s fault The first half of the Old Testament has a lotaction than the last half Still, the writing is fun enough to keep you engaged One of the funniest books I ve ever read I loved it Good Book is a summary of the Old Testament, told by David Plotz, an editor for Slate Magazine It is his sincere effort to better understand the bible but his compendium is sarcastic, sardonic, and hilarious I enjoyed the first half a lotthan I enjoyed the second half but that is not really Plotz s fault The first half of the Old Testament has a lotaction than the last half Still, the writing is fun enough to keep you engaged Ii is interesting that researching the bible left Plotzcommitted to Judaism, yet less committed to God He concludes that there must not be a God, at least not the one that is described in the bible I really can t do Plotz s humor justice so here are a few of my favorite snippets In other words, God is causing the plagues so that we can tell stories about the plagues He s torturing the Egyptians so that we will worship Him What kind of insecure and cruel God murders children so that His followers will obey Him, and will tell stories about him This is the behavior of a serial killer Once we finish with slavery, it becomes clear that God is a hanging judge His punishment for intentional killing is death Punishment for kidnapping death Punishment for idolatry death Punishment for striking a parent death Punishment for insulting a parent death Punishment for bestiality death On the other hand, if you seduce a virgin, you only have to pay off her family I don t understand how modern liberal Catholics, Jews, and Protestants can use the bible to justify their opposition to capital punishment If there is one thing God truly believes in, it s a good old firing squad It turns out Deuteronomy consists of several rambling, Fidel Castro length speeches by the dying Moses to his people Think of it as the Moses farewell tour And there, my friends, you have practically the entire history of Israel, of the Middle East, and of planet Earth, in two short sentences Your God says it s yours Our god says it s ours Meet you at nine AM on the battlefield


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