The Winter of Our Discontent MOBI Å The Winter PDF \



10 thoughts on “The Winter of Our Discontent

  1. Meghan Pinson Meghan Pinson says:

    I think I have a crush on John Steinbeck But even if I met him somewhere a cocktail party, a barbeque, even my own bookstore I don t think I d talk to him Maybe make eye contact in a brave and silent way Sometimes I get the feeling that he is friendly and easy going, compassionate and kind, and really interested in people in general and persons in particular but I know that he is deeply brilliant, and I would say something ridiculous that I would turn over and over in my head menta I think I have a crush on John Steinbeck But even if I met him somewhere a cocktail party, a barbeque, even my own bookstore I don t think I d talk to him Maybe make eye contact in a brave and silent way Sometimes I get the feeling that he is friendly and easy going, compassionate and kind, and really interested in people in general and persons in particular but I know that he is deeply brilliant, and I would say something ridiculous that I would turn over and over in my head mentally, to myself for years Like I did with A.M Homes, and she s nowhere near as brilliant, and gives off nary an aroma of friendliness When I finished this book the other day, I went through my favorite ritual of writing my name and the month and year on the first page of the book, and went to shelve it alphabetically among its fictional brothers While I was there, I pulled out the other Steinbeck novels to find out when I first read them most of them are dated 1993 I had forgotten that I owe my discovery of Steinbeck to my friend Erica, who read East of Eden in 8th grade, when I was still churning through Nancy Drew, Mary Higgins Clark and V.C Andrews I was inspired and intimidated by Erica s reading lists she was reading Kerouac and Ginsberg when she was 13 Maybe before, with her parents Who knows I wasn t ready to tackle East of Eden yet, but I picked up a copy of Of Mice Men Cannery Row and then The Wayward Bus, and Burning Bright, and Sweet Thursday and loved them all But it wasn t until this year that I picked up the big ones Grapes of Wrath, good God And The Winter of Our Discontent here s my favorite sentence, from the beginning of Chapter 15 It was a day as different from other days as dogs are from cats and both of them from chrysanthemums or tidal waves or scarlet fever Yay Today, fifteen years after the seed was planted, I begin East of Eden


  2. Lyn Lyn says:

    Steinbeck s The Winter of Our Discontent was first published in 1961 and was his last novel.It was also the latest book published prior to his winning the 1962 Nobel Prize for literature Interestingly, when asked if he felt that he deserved the award, this giant of American letters said Frankly, no Further, recent archives revealed that Steinbeck was a compromise choice for the award amidst a group described as a bad lot Although the committee believed Steinbeck s best work was behin Steinbeck s The Winter of Our Discontent was first published in 1961 and was his last novel.It was also the latest book published prior to his winning the 1962 Nobel Prize for literature Interestingly, when asked if he felt that he deserved the award, this giant of American letters said Frankly, no Further, recent archives revealed that Steinbeck was a compromise choice for the award amidst a group described as a bad lot Although the committee believed Steinbeck s best work was behind him by 1962, committee member Anders sterling believed the release of his novel The Winter of Our Discontent in 1961 showed that after some signs of slowing down in recent years, Steinbeck has regained his position as a social truth teller and is an authentic realist fully equal to his predecessors Sinclair Lewis and Ernest Hemingway Wikipedia.I read several of his works in HS, many moons ago, and last year returned to his canon with his short, brilliant work The Moon Is Down Steinbeck is to me, the quintessential twentieth century American writer Hemingway and Faulkner were bridges to an older time, almost lost in mythic dreams of the past Steinbeck is forward looking, one who chronicles our struggles, reveals our sins and comments upon the path we are on now.It is in this last endeavor where The Winter of Our Discontent fits Steinbeck tells the tale of Ethan Allen Hawley, a tragic and lost son of old New England wealth, his connections to the Pilgrim Pirate heroes of his old family all but lost after the money is gone, but the old house and the family name remain The reader finds Ethan working as a grocery clerk, in a town his family once all but owned, and working for an Italian immigrant.In this setting, Steinbeck goes on to describe a modern American morality play From the town manager, to the judges, to the banker, and all the way to the fortune telling divorcee the town is corrupt and self serving, but retaining the outward mask and appearance of civility and propriety Ethan s dilemma, in the post World War II era, is one that still resonates today, but in amplified and exponential terms.Now, I ll go out on a limb and compare Steinbeck s New Baytown to two unlikely later artists I have noticed, especially in Philip K Dick s Confessions of a Crap Artist that his descriptions of later 50s northern California was Steinbeckesque I m not sure that Steinbeck ever heard of Philip K Dick, much less ever read his work, but a fan of Steinbeck s writing may be pleasantly surprised to visit PKD s short list of non science fiction works.Also, and this likeness isobscure Peter Benchley s Jaws is the literary descendant of Steinbeck s east coast morality play True, Steinbeck does not illustrate the killing rampage of a prehistoric predator on a summer hamlet or does he Steinbeck s monster is, like Benchley s andobscurely Melville s really the elitist fa ade of correctness amidst a society being consumed from within


  3. Richard Derus Richard Derus says:

    Rating 6 of fiveThe Publisher Says Ethan Allen Hawley, the protagonist of Steinbeck s last novel, works as a clerk in a grocery store that his family once owned With Ethan no longer a member of Long Island s aristocratic class, his wife is restless, and his teenage children are hungry for the tantalizing material comforts he cannot provide Then one day, in a moment of moral crisis, Ethan decides to take a holiday from his own scrupulous standards.Set in Steinbeck s contemporary 1960 America Rating 6 of fiveThe Publisher Says Ethan Allen Hawley, the protagonist of Steinbeck s last novel, works as a clerk in a grocery store that his family once owned With Ethan no longer a member of Long Island s aristocratic class, his wife is restless, and his teenage children are hungry for the tantalizing material comforts he cannot provide Then one day, in a moment of moral crisis, Ethan decides to take a holiday from his own scrupulous standards.Set in Steinbeck s contemporary 1960 America, the novel explores the tenuous line between private and public honesty that today ranks it alongside his most acclaimed works of penetrating insight into the American condition This edition features an introduction and notes by Steinbeck scholar Susan Shillinglaw.My Review This is a wonderful short novel by a master of his craft at the peak of his form It is also his last novel.Some people at the time it was published felt it was a wrong turning for Steinbeck The Grapes of Wrath, Tortilla Flat to abandon both the west coast that had made him famous and brought his considerable social conscience to the world s attention for an east coast grifter s POV The Winter of Our Discontent is a story that has nothing but shades of gray Everyone in it is shady somehow That is, I think, what verschmeckled the reviewers and made the public angry Up until then, there were clear cut Good Guys and Bad Guys in every Steinbeck tale Hereno, no one qualifies as all good or all bad.The POV is of Ethan, a man who is the degenerate scion of a venerable family He is married with teenaged kids, and he will do anything to support his family Including, to their horror, work for an Italian grocer as his clerk The nerve of the man, a son of the founder of his town, working for someone who should be his gardener, according to his friends and his kids.Well, he thinks, how can I help it, we all gotta eat So he hatches a plot that will restore the family honor by swindling a friend He goes through with it He gets what he wants And, frankly, so does the swindled friend, an alcoholic prowling for his next few thousand drinks.This isn t really Steinbecky stuff, it s too hard to pin down from a moral standpoint On the other hand, it s superbly told, and it s amazingly well crafted, and it s undoubtedly the best thing Steinbeck wrote after 1950 Reviews were harsh, sales were poor, and Steinbeck lost heart for fiction after that He published two travel books before his death in 1968, a mere 30 years after The Grapes of Wrath burst on the scene Imagine the wonders he could have produced had he lived to an Updikey 80 plus.What a wonderful read, and so overlookedplease don t overlook it any longer


  4. Henry Avila Henry Avila says:

    John Steinbeck s last novel and it shows when an author pontificates his views to the readers he becomes not a writer any but a preacher Disappointed in life Steinbeck tries to convey his dark feelings to the rest of the world even if they aren t too interestedthere s many others, nevertheless a great novel which few scibblers could match Ethan Allen Hawley named after famous Revolutionary War hero has a confortable but ordinary existance a loving , loyal , pretty wife Mary, two troub John Steinbeck s last novel and it shows when an author pontificates his views to the readers he becomes not a writer any but a preacher Disappointed in life Steinbeck tries to convey his dark feelings to the rest of the world even if they aren t too interestedthere s many others, nevertheless a great novel which few scibblers could match Ethan Allen Hawley named after famous Revolutionary War hero has a confortable but ordinary existance a loving , loyal , pretty wife Mary, two troublesome teenagers, Allen and Ellen yet quite normal His problem the family background, coming from an old aristocratic clan and Ethan just a grocery clerk, the store owned by an Italian immigrant, the strict, secretive Marullo All the Long Island town of New Baytown reiterates his background and he should take a prominent position in the city, worst his wife is tired of being poor and puts substanial pressure on Ethan Only by devious means can the honest man achieve this success, he has too often seen it happen in the corrupt settlement Danny Taylor his boyhood best friend, now the town drunk , has valuable land where an airport would fit there very nicely Can he trick the poor pathetic man by stealing it He is deeply wounded by the decline of Danny, so much promise ending up in misery and despair, unable to help the troubled inebriate His boss maybe isn t legally in Americaeasily rectified by a phone call Nothing really bad everyone else does these trivial thingsright The sticky problen is Ethan has a conscious, he knows good from evil, the World War 2 veteran doesn t lack courage in combat however civilians must behave differently no license to kill here Margie Young Hunt is very feching, his wife Mary s , best friend, a woman searching for a mate , had already two before, a tasty morsel if he can cross the forbidden line, she seems willing Mr Baker the unethical, greedy president of the bank and only one in town wants Danny Taylor s land an airport would be good business, everyone could benefit handsomely, especially Mr Baker Ethan needs to make choicesstill how will the man live with himself if wrong, all people are in the same boat floating or sinking, those who are good navigators and manage well will reach the magical shore the others descend to the murky bottom


  5. Vit Babenco Vit Babenco says:

    And when they had platted a crown of thorns, they put it upon his head, and a reed in his right hand and they bowed the knee before him, and mocked him, saying, Hail, King of the Jews Matthew 27 29A man will rise A man will fall The Winter of Our Discontent is about guilty conscience The Winter of Our Discontent is about the nature of fortune and misfortune.Now I was on the edge of the minefield My heart hardened against my selfless benefactor I felt it harden and grow wary and dangerous And when they had platted a crown of thorns, they put it upon his head, and a reed in his right hand and they bowed the knee before him, and mocked him, saying, Hail, King of the Jews Matthew 27 29A man will rise A man will fall The Winter of Our Discontent is about guilty conscience The Winter of Our Discontent is about the nature of fortune and misfortune.Now I was on the edge of the minefield My heart hardened against my selfless benefactor I felt it harden and grow wary and dangerous And with its direction came the feeling of combat, and the laws of controlled savagery, and the first law is Let even your defense have the appearance of attack.Dishonesty is a foundation of prosperity And honesty leads to discontent


  6. Sara Sara says:

    The brilliance of John Steinbeck intimidates me I spend a great deal of my time while reading his books nodding my head in agreement and gasping in awe at how he tackles the profound and the everyday with the same amount of elan.First off, I enjoyed this story I cared about Ethan Allen Hawley, and not just his person but his soul I wanted him to emerge unscathed even though I knew he could not, because no one can compromise his own morality and remain unsoiled I cried for what I knew was his The brilliance of John Steinbeck intimidates me I spend a great deal of my time while reading his books nodding my head in agreement and gasping in awe at how he tackles the profound and the everyday with the same amount of elan.First off, I enjoyed this story I cared about Ethan Allen Hawley, and not just his person but his soul I wanted him to emerge unscathed even though I knew he could not, because no one can compromise his own morality and remain unsoiled I cried for what I knew was his major loss and yet I ended still hoping he could find some way to live with what he had done without resorting to lying to himself, which would only deepen the corruption.This is the world he lives in, and I dare say it is the world we live in as well The Town Manager sold equipment to the township, and the judges fixed traffic tickets as they had for so long that they did not remember it as illegal practice at least the books said it was Being normal men, they surely did not consider it immoral All men are moral Only their neighbors are not.How much immorality is too much Do the ends justify the means Is your sin less egregious if you are sinning against a sinner And, to quote Mark 8 36, For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul There is a reason John Steinbeck is considered one of the great American authors It has something to do with his ability to tell a fascinating tale and still pack so many unobtrusive, salient issues into its telling.Just onequote, because who wouldn t appreciate this kind of imageryThe young boys, bleeding with sap, sit on the stools of Tanger s Drugstore ingesting future pimples through straws They watch the girls with level goat eyes and make disparaging remarks to one another while their insides whimper with longingDigest that


  7. Joe Valdez Joe Valdez says:

    I was forwarded a blog post recently written by someone much sharper than me that asked where our contemporary John Steinbecks have gone The masterful fiction dedicated to the minimum wage worker, the family displaced by the Great Recession living out of a motel room, or anyone living from paycheck to paycheck seems largely extinct from the bestseller lists Hard luck stories about average American families fill newspapers, while in fiction, it seems like world building, not world reporting, I was forwarded a blog post recently written by someone much sharper than me that asked where our contemporary John Steinbecks have gone The masterful fiction dedicated to the minimum wage worker, the family displaced by the Great Recession living out of a motel room, or anyone living from paycheck to paycheck seems largely extinct from the bestseller lists Hard luck stories about average American families fill newspapers, while in fiction, it seems like world building, not world reporting, are what get traffic Steinbeck didn t have to worry about launching his author platform or getting retweeted in 1961 when his nineteenth novel was published His storytelling, his vibrant and passionate depictions of the American worker, and his wisdom, are needed nowthan ever The Winter of Our Discontent takes place between Good Friday and the Fourth of July, 1960 Steinbeck apparently wrote the first draft during that same stretch of time Rather than the Salinas Valley, the story takes place in the fictional hamlet of New Baytown, in northern Maine The novel is narrated by Ethan Allen Hawley, a grocery clerk whose ancestors made their fortune as privateers a discreet way of saying pirates on the seas The empire built by the Hawleys was squandered by Ethan s father through bad investments, while Ethan returned from war to briefly own and operate a grocery store that couldn t stay open Now a mere employee in a store run by a Sicilian immigrant named Marullo Ethan s boss regards him with equal parts pride and pity, grateful at the straight line that Ethan walks never cheating or stealing while also trying to advise the kid on how to make a dollar and a cent in this country The key to the latter seems to come back to cheating or stealing.Well liked in spite of the acidic wit he dispenses around his wife Mary and adolescent children Ellen and Allen, Ethan s fortunes begin to change when his wife s friend, a gold digging floozy with a flair for fortune telling named Margie Young Hunt, forecasts that Ethan is destined to become one of the most important men in town The news is met with elation by Ethan s family, tired of being poor Ethan opts to play the game for a while, to prove how easy it is to become a financial success and how little it changes things once you become one.Ethan ends up being right on one count, wrong on the other.A series of seemingly unrelated events fall into place around Ethan, each expertly crafted by Steinbeck There s Ethan s childhood friend Danny Taylor, a Naval Academy washout whose disappointment to his family transformed him into the town drunk, albeit, a drunk who owns the most valuable real estate around There s bank teller Joey Brophy, a cad who explains to Ethan how he d rob a bank if he wanted to get away with it There s Mr Baker, a banker dogging Ethan to invest money left to Mary by her brother Ethan learns of big changes coming to New Baytown and by virtue of his family name, seems poised to benefit Ethan doesn t feel sorry for himself or blame anyone for his mistakes as much as he s resigned to watch life from the sidelines now, sick of the hypocrisy his wife and his quiz show obsessed son seem eager to engage in Ethan isn t the most likable narrator, but I could identify with him I liked the way that Steinbeck balanced the Way It Used To Be Ethan holds conversations with both his late grandfather Cap n, the last mariner in the Hawley line, and his late Aunt Deborah, who taught her nephew how to use his mind and his conscience with the way things seem to be headed In addition to the central character, I had some misgivings about the ending, but I take this as a virtue of the author for investing me in characters I care about Margie Young Hunt is a terrific character, a sexually liberated sorceress of a sort who doesn t feel sorry for herself either, and like Ethan, can t seem to resist making waves in the pond Steinbeck s dialogue is so good and in this novel, we again glimpse what seem like real adults working over what seem like insurmountable economic or social problems at the kitchen table Steinbeck s gift is making something so mundane so riveting on the page


  8. William S. William S. says:

    There is a certain emotion in Steinbeck I have not found in other authors Faulkner comes close, Hemingway a bit further off, perhaps Woolf is on a parallel path Steinbeck shows us something into ourselves, he states in the book that we all have our own light, we are not a bonfire We only understand others to the point that we assume they are akin to ourselves Steinbeck, like Woolf in the Waves, shows us that we are all connected, and that we can find a path in this world through this novel There is a certain emotion in Steinbeck I have not found in other authors Faulkner comes close, Hemingway a bit further off, perhaps Woolf is on a parallel path Steinbeck shows us something into ourselves, he states in the book that we all have our own light, we are not a bonfire We only understand others to the point that we assume they are akin to ourselves Steinbeck, like Woolf in the Waves, shows us that we are all connected, and that we can find a path in this world through this novel This novel has been criticized by others for being lacking in the character development and depth of his other novels like East of Eden and Grapes of Wrath I agree It s not a long novel It only develops one character narrator to the full extent and shows us the world around him But that s the point He states that we can only know ourselves, and we might not even know that People look to this book to find a copy of what he has already done, but he changes in this book He puts us finally inside the head of one of the characters instead of Steinbeck telling us the story He is giving us, in a sense, a parting gift The reason people do not like this book is because they want another East of Eden, but this is just as good, if not better I do not often read novels that allow me to think about my own self this much I don t think this would be my first recommendation for a Steinbeck novel, I think one needs to understand his changes from Grapes, Eden, etc to appreciate this , but even still, this is my new favorite of his


  9. Kim Kim says:

    When I started reading this, the last novel written by John Steinbeck, I initially thought that I wasn t going to like it The prose was as fine as I expected it to be, but it seemed such a small story, compared to powerful epics like The Grapes of Wrath and East of Eden However, the story grew on me as I read and the ending packed a punch Mostly in the form of a first person narrative, the novel is about Ethan Hawley, a likeable man in his late thirties, married to a woman he loves and the fa When I started reading this, the last novel written by John Steinbeck, I initially thought that I wasn t going to like it The prose was as fine as I expected it to be, but it seemed such a small story, compared to powerful epics like The Grapes of Wrath and East of Eden However, the story grew on me as I read and the ending packed a punch Mostly in the form of a first person narrative, the novel is about Ethan Hawley, a likeable man in his late thirties, married to a woman he loves and the father of two teenagers Ethan comes from an old and formerly wealthy family in the fictional seaside town in which he lives However, his father lost the family fortune and Ethan now works as clerk in a grocery store a grocery store his family used to own As well educated and intelligent as he is, Ethan has done nothing to reverse the family s precarious financial position Until now, that is, when a number of circumstances conspire to make Ethan re think his scrupulous honesty and integrity At its heart, the novel is a critique of what Steinbeck considered to be the decline in morality in American society in the 1950s and 1960s, something he also addressed in Travels with Charley In Search of America Steinbeck wasn t concerned with sexual morality, but with hypocrisy and corruption in government and in society generally While the message is clear and it s a message just as relevant today as it was in the early 1960s the novel isn t a simple morality play Ethan is portrayed as a good man As he acts against his innate sense of honour and integrity, he remains likeable In going to the dark side, even temporarily, he acts against his instincts and in many ways the novel posesquestions than it gives answers about greed, dishonesty, corruption and betrayal Anyone reading this novel who expects another Grapes of Wrath or East of Eden is bound to be disappointed This is a small, intimate novel and it has its flaws But it s a powerful work in its own quiet way


  10. Ryan Ryan says:

    Don t pass this one up in your choosing which Steinbeck book to consume my hungry rabble I had no expectations of this wonderful little story and now it is one of my favorites Give yourself for a few hours for there is much to take from Ethan and all Steinbeck s creation Crestfallen to come to it s end, as it is with most of his work Now is the winter of our discontent Made glorious summer by this son of York


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The Winter of Our Discontent ✽ [EPUB] ✵ The Winter of Our Discontent By John Steinbeck ❧ – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Ethan Allen Hawley, the protagonist of Steinbeck s last novel, works as a clerk in a grocery store that his family once owned With Ethan no longer a member of Long Island s aristocratic class, his wif Ethan Allen Hawley, the protagonist of Our PDF/EPUB ç of Steinbeck s last novel, works as a clerk in a grocery store that his family once owned With Ethan no longer a member of Long Island s aristocratic class, his wife is restless, and his teenage children are hungry for the tantalizing material comforts he cannot provide Then one day, in a moment of moral crisis, Ethan decides to take a holiday from his own scrupulous standardsSet in The Winter PDF \ Steinbeck s contemporaryAmerica, the novel explores the tenuous line between private and public honesty that today ranks it alongside his most acclaimed works of penetrating insight into the American condition This edition features an introduction and notes by Steinbeck scholar Susan Shillinglaw.