[[ PDF / Epub ]] ☄ Whistleblower: My Journey to Silicon Valley and Fight for Justice at Uber Author Susan Fowler – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk



10 thoughts on “Whistleblower: My Journey to Silicon Valley and Fight for Justice at Uber

  1. says:

    Later in the memoir, Fowler relates a seemingly minor anecdote, one that might seem insignificant given the level of mistreatment she s experienced during her time in Silicon Valley Basically, Uber ordered all the engineers on her team leather jackets Just like the other employees, Folwer provided her sizing information and promptly forgot about it Shortly afterwards, she receives an email explaining that because there were so few female engineers, the company wasn t able to get the bulk disc Later in the memoir, Fowler relates a seemingly minor anecdote, one that might seem insignificant given the level of mistreatment she s experienced during her time in Silicon Valley Basically, Uber ordered all the engineers on her team leather jackets Just like the other employees, Folwer provided her sizing information and promptly forgot about it Shortly afterwards, she receives an email explaining that because there were so few female engineers, the company wasn t able to get the bulk discount, so they were only ordering male jackets Furious, Fowler protested the decision, pointing out that the company could surely afford the few hundred dollars to show respect to the female employees Naturally, management put up resistance, which was so ridiculous that she couldn t help but laugh about it with her female colleagues As she puts it, It was an absurd situation, filled with such ridiculously blatant, banal sexism, that neither of us could believe it was really happening While Folwer s book is fascinating in several respects it is, among other things, a story about how a working class women learns to survive in a world of privilege it is most powerfully a chronicle of blatant, banal sexism, the endless daily humiliations that grind people down and lead them to accept the system Because of our nature as people, we tend to focus on the monsters, the exceptionally horrible people that are so bankrupt it is hard to muster anything kind to say about them And, of course, Whistleblower has plenty of monstrous figures In her time in the physics department at the University of Pennsylvania, a female graduate adviser deceives her into thinking she wants to help her navigate a sexual harassment claim, only to use it as an excuse to deny her a Philosophy MA that she had earned through her coursework At a small tech firm, a manager goes on a diatribe about how you can t trust female employees because all they want is to have babies Her boss at Uber propositions on the first day, which he apparently did to almost his female colleagues But the monsters are not what I found most overwhelming Rather, it was the mundane, everyday sexism that seemed to be endlessly excused by other people Just to give you a few examples and this list could probably stretch across several pages here are some things just briefly mentioned, almost as an aside to the main narrative The physics lab where she worked as an undergraduate didn t have a female restroom Her undergraduate adviser tried to kick her out of the physics program, simply because she hadn t passed her introductory courses A doctor from student health services propositioned her over social media She discovers, at one point, that she s being paid considerably less than her male colleagues at her first job She is continually told that white men stick around in technology companies because they are better engineers She is given a patronizingly simple programming problem during her Uber job interview, which she assumes is because her interviewers didn t trust her expertise The book is an inspiring portrait of a woman who decided to take on the system despite considerable risk to both herself and her family However, it s also a portrait of systematic discrimination and how it operates through continually emphasizing a person s outsider status until they reach the point of exhaustion The smaller humiliations are what create a space for the larger monstrosities For those of us who want to be allies, it means we must dothan just call out the Harvey Weinsteins We also need to focus on the little microaggressions in our daily lives, such as the snide remarks and harmless jokes that often are let slide Especially for those of us who work with young people, it means modeling how a different world might look and perhaps evenimportantly, being honest about the world that exists, so they can work toward making a change Bottom line great, inspiring book Highly recommended for anyone interested in the technology industry


  2. says:

    The Uber blog post from several years ago left a big impression on me, as I was just emerging from my own experience with a toxic work atmosphere, harassment and issues with the Title IX office in a physics department It was at a time when such things were not often discussed publicly, so that one learned by stumbling through the mess oneself I barely knew what harassment was until it happened to me, and I was also naive to believe that I should trust people who told me they would help me inc The Uber blog post from several years ago left a big impression on me, as I was just emerging from my own experience with a toxic work atmosphere, harassment and issues with the Title IX office in a physics department It was at a time when such things were not often discussed publicly, so that one learned by stumbling through the mess oneself I barely knew what harassment was until it happened to me, and I was also naive to believe that I should trust people who told me they would help me including a lawyer working for the university, not for me Much of what Fowler writes here about harassment in physics and tech really resonates with me There are details that go well beyond the blog post, from her childhood background growing up in poverty in Arizona to additional information about her time at Uber for instance the atmosphere was so toxic there that another employee committed suicide Fowler additionally recounts some harassment that was handled terribly by the Title IX office at UPenn while she was studying physics there, which ultimately led her to leave physics The gaslighting from both the Title IX office at UPenn and HR at Uber almost seems unreal until you experience such a thing yourself the fact that she was additionally stalked by private investigators after writing the blog post is completely terrifying and goes beyond anything I have experienced.I found this to be a well written, important recounting of issues that push women out of STEM and tech Thanks to brave women like Fowler, the next generation will at least know about and be better prepared for these issues when they enter the field, and with any luck be able to avoid them altogether


  3. says:

    She presents herself as the only one in the world who has ever struggled to reach success Too much ego in this prose Even as a memior, it s too self important It s great to hear the female experience in tech, however, and I m glad I read it It s just not my prefered tone.


  4. says:

    I devoured this book in 48 hours, and, TLDR you should too.Susan s blog post blowing the whistle on Uber s horrific workplace culture in 2017 set in motion changes and tough conversations not just at the ride sharing startup, but across Silicon Valley and beyond.Her memoir tells the full story of what happened at Uber in much greater detail, but it would be diminishing to say that this is what this book is about.It s so much .This is an account of someone not taking no for an answer of som I devoured this book in 48 hours, and, TLDR you should too.Susan s blog post blowing the whistle on Uber s horrific workplace culture in 2017 set in motion changes and tough conversations not just at the ride sharing startup, but across Silicon Valley and beyond.Her memoir tells the full story of what happened at Uber in much greater detail, but it would be diminishing to say that this is what this book is about.It s so much .This is an account of someone not taking no for an answer of someone unrelentingly driven in the pursuit of knowledge, education and self actualisation of someone taking and reclaiming power in so many different ways Susan s life story is story enough.I reckon I ve become a bit numb to horrific stories of startup and academic culture, and so I wasn t all that shocked by Susan s experience, but the matter of fact account, displayed with such clarity, was a joy if you can say that about problematic stories to read.This book was so inspiring, so quick to fly through, and left me pondering many questions about speaking up, power and lifelong learning.Brilliant


  5. says:

    I almost read it in one gulp but I had to take a break in between because what happened to Susan totally incensed me I loved every chapter of it, her upbringing, the dreams, the hunger for knowledge, awful stories of what to her happened sexual harassment on her first day, Jesus Christ.And Susan, you are very very brave You had to revisit and open the wounds again to write this book You totally deserve to be commended.


  6. says:

    Hell hath no fury.and, from what I read, Uber had no conscience, no compassion, and no humility either This book is worth reading, if for no other reason than to make you think twice about standing up for your right to be treated fairly, equally, and with respect That might sound odd, but if you are going to take on the giant you better have a really thick skin, a strong constitution, and a solid base of supporters because the retaliation can be swift, cruel, and relentless Hell hath no fury.and, from what I read, Uber had no conscience, no compassion, and no humility either This book is worth reading, if for no other reason than to make you think twice about standing up for your right to be treated fairly, equally, and with respect That might sound odd, but if you are going to take on the giant you better have a really thick skin, a strong constitution, and a solid base of supporters because the retaliation can be swift, cruel, and relentless


  7. says:

    Rating 3 5It s hard to rate this book because I truly believe that what was achieved was very important for society and for the world That said, rating this purely as a book, it falls a little short For one, the ending feels quite sudden this still feels like the middle of Susan Fowler s story and not the end While the anecdotes about Penn were interesting, they seemed as though they would best align with the Uber story as a series of blogposts, rather than a book.The audiobook felt a bit Rating 3 5It s hard to rate this book because I truly believe that what was achieved was very important for society and for the world That said, rating this purely as a book, it falls a little short For one, the ending feels quite sudden this still feels like the middle of Susan Fowler s story and not the end While the anecdotes about Penn were interesting, they seemed as though they would best align with the Uber story as a series of blogposts, rather than a book.The audiobook felt a bit impersonal at times, which contrasts with some of the better audiobooks I ve read like those by Anna Kendrick and Tiffany Haddish There were parts where this was not the case particularly emotional parts like the death of her father meeting her husband Chad , but for the most part it felt like someone else reading the autobiography.I did enjoy the start of the book, describing her struggles with poverty and how stoicism enabled her to single handedly climb out of it a to be recurring theme The book also details the methodical way Ms Fowler went about the repeated instances of sexual harrassment, learning from past experiences each time One anecdote that stuck was about Cmd Shift 4 ing a chat out of habit.Overall, a book I was really looking forward to, but on the whole did not deliver muchthan the Uber blog post That said, its brevity is good you can always read it and judge for yourself without feeling like days were consumed and I would still look forward to the next book by the author if autobiographical, then hopefully after a few years


  8. says:

    No need to read the book can look up her original blog post The only difference is the book has muchof her large ego tone Proud of her for standing up but just wish she did it in arelatable tone to the readers


  9. says:

    What an incredibly difficult read Fowler is honest and clear eyed about her life before Uber and provides all the details behind the infamous blog post that opened up the floodgates for stories about sexual harassment in Silicon Valley and led to the ouster of Uber s CEO It s difficult because the gaslighting that Fowler faced every step of the way was so pervasive that it made me want to scream Hats off to Susan and all those like her who have fought for the right simply to do their jobs wit What an incredibly difficult read Fowler is honest and clear eyed about her life before Uber and provides all the details behind the infamous blog post that opened up the floodgates for stories about sexual harassment in Silicon Valley and led to the ouster of Uber s CEO It s difficult because the gaslighting that Fowler faced every step of the way was so pervasive that it made me want to scream Hats off to Susan and all those like her who have fought for the right simply to do their jobs without being harassed


  10. says:

    It got to the point where I wasn t able to hold back my tears until after meetings any I found myself wiping tears from my face right there in the meetings, hoping that nobody would notice then I d go home after work and cry myself to sleep On days like that, I thought seriously about leaving Uber I even applied for several other jobs But, ultimately, I decided to stay I was twenty five years old Uber was the third company I d worked at since I graduated from Penn only a year and a ha It got to the point where I wasn t able to hold back my tears until after meetings any I found myself wiping tears from my face right there in the meetings, hoping that nobody would notice then I d go home after work and cry myself to sleep On days like that, I thought seriously about leaving Uber I even applied for several other jobs But, ultimately, I decided to stay I was twenty five years old Uber was the third company I d worked at since I graduated from Penn only a year and a half earlier How could I convince the companies I applied to that the problem was with Uber, and not with me Even worse, what if Kevin and Duncan were right, I d wonder, and I was really an awful engineer What if I was so awful that I would never get another job in engineering This book is the result of Susan Fowler s efforts after she posted a famous blog post about working at Uber for a year She was the victim of structural sexual discrimination that flourished in the company, where a culture of sweeping all problems i.e sexual abuse complaints to HR and management under the rug was the norm.Fowler is a deft writer who takes the reader on a journey through her younger years, finding her way into both logics and philosophy and later into programming She was hit with discrimination during her education at the University of Pennsylvania in the end of that bout, she let it be I took the lawyers advice and decided to move on with my life But before I did, I carefully documented everything, saving every email, every call log, every text message There was part of me that wondered if perhaps I d change my mind about suing them in the future And there was another part of me that thought I d want to write about it someday My heart broke when I realized that moving on meant giving up on my dream The professors I d been counting on for letters of recommendation now refused to talk to me because of the situation with Tim, and without the recommendation letters I needed, I knew I would never be accepted into a physics PhD program So I trashed my graduate school applications and, with them, my hopes of becoming a physicist.She made her way to Silicon Valley and spread her wings, first, at a company named Plaid Everyone went out for drinks that night to celebrate the two new employees me and the new office manager, Heidi We were the only women in the office as I later learned, they had us start on the same day so that we wouldn t feel alone Ooh, the misogyny doesn t seep through it pours.Fowler writes well about sexism and other types of work related abuse becoming normalised She writes about leaving Plaid for another company, PubNub Within a few days, I found out that my boss who managed me and one other employee was openly, unabashedly sexist He commented on my clothing, making fun of me if I ever dressed nicely and telling me I was dumpy if I wore jeans and a T shirt He told me that he bet any man I was dating was off secretly having sex with prostitutes He was also anti Semitic, frequently commenting about how stingy and Jewish he thought the founders were I didn t dare tell him that I was Jewish, too The only way I could deal with it was to keep my head down, do my work, and try not to pay attention to anything he said To keep myself sane, I read the philosophers Epictetus, Seneca, and Marcus Aurelius every morning on my way to work and during my lunch breaks.Fowler loves or, at least, loved stoic philosophers This paragraph jumped out at me as seeming very strange The words of the Stoics reinforced what I already knew I couldn t control what others did to me, but I could control how I reacted.I disagree with not being able to control what others do this book is proof that one s actions lead to how others treat you Also, it s not always possible to control one s own reactions, e.g if raped These are important distinctions.Before signing on with Uber, Fowler searched the web to see whether she could find any wrongdoings at the company she found nothing What I didn t know at the time was that the mere fact that there was no public record of wrongdoing wasn t because Uber had a spotless record, but because all Uber employees were bound by forced arbitration Forced arbitration clauses are often included in employment agreements that workers must sign as a condition of employment, usually on their very first day of work not only at tech companies like Uber, but at many companies in the United States.Nefarious, to say the least.One early warning sign at Uber was this Uber encouraged employees to spend time working with their coworkers over the holidays rather than with their families and offered employees free all inclusive trips almost anywhere in the world if they chose work over family.Her manager swiftly started writing about his open relationship with his girlfriend and went into sex immediately and often When Fowler turned to HR to rectify the situation, they reacted Then she gave me a choice I could stay on the cloud team, with Jake as my manager though I would likely receive a bad performance review from him because I had turned down his advances and reported him to HR or I could transfer to a different SRE team.This book should be read by men, especially men in manager or executive roles, to not only make them understand how non men are being treated by men, but also make them aware of their fallacies if something is brought to HR, it must be treated with the urgency it deserves Everybody deserves to be treated equally and nicely at work.Fowler bravely fought Uber, their HR people, went to executives, spoke with friends and family, and went further than a lot of people would dare or have the strength to do, while battling an earthquake of issues that were designed to make her quit working at Uber.Still, she persisted, and the rest is history one person can make a difference even thoughpersons than herself were involved in toppling Uber s sexist structure, which may still be in place for all I know.There are lovely segues throughout the book that point to a promising future for non male tech workers including men Rigetti Quantum Computing and Uber Technologies were at opposite ends of the spectrum Chad wanted Rigetti Quantum Computing to be a company filled with joy, where people came into work excited and passionate about the technical challenges of building quantum computers and working as a team to solve hard problems Uber, on the other hand, was a company driven by aggression, hell bent on destroying the competition no matter the cost, where it felt like people came into work to tear down, not to build up.To quote Beastie Boys be true to yourself and you will never fall.Susan Fowler was brave enough to stand up against a tech giant and they fell.This book is both a lovely example of how critique and whistleblowing must be included in a worker s guide and how great workplaces can be built


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Whistleblower: My Journey to Silicon Valley and Fight for Justice at Uber The Unbelievable True Story Of The Young Woman Who Faced Down One Of The Most Valuable Startups In Silicon Valley History And What Came AfterIn , Twenty Six Year Old Susan Fowler Published A Blog Post Detailing The Sexual Harassment And Retaliation She D Experienced As An Entry Level Engineer At Uber The Post Went Viral, Leading Not Only To The Ouster Of Uber S CEO And Twenty Other Employees, But Starting A Bonfire On Creepy Sexual Behavior In Silicon Valley That Spread To Hollywood And Engulfed Harvey Weinstein Maureen Dowd, The New York TimesWhen Susan Decided To Share Her Story, She Was Fully Aware Of The Consequences Most Women Faced For Speaking Out About Harassment Prior To The MeToo Era But, As Her Inspiring Memoir, Whistleblower, Reveals, This Courageous Act Was Entirely Consistent With Susan S Young Life So Far A Life Characterized By Extraordinary Determination, A Refusal To Accept Things As They Are, And The Desire To Do What Is Good And Right Growing Up In Poverty In Rural Arizona, She Was Denied A Formal Education Yet Went On To Obtain An Ivy League Degree When She Was Told, After Discovering The Pervasive Culture Of Sexism, Harassment, Racism, And Abuse At Uber, That She Was The Problem, She Banded Together With Other Women To Try To Make Change When That Didn T Work, She Went Public She Could Never Have Anticipated The Lengths To Which Uber Would Go In Its Efforts To Intimidate And Discredit Her, The Impact Her Words Would Have On Silicon Valley And The World Or How They Would Set Her On A Course Toward Finally Achieving Her DreamsThe Moving Story Of A Woman S Lifelong Fight To Do What She Loves Despite Repeatedly Being Told No Or Treated As Less Than Whistleblower Is Both A Riveting Read And A Source Of Inspiration For Anyone Seeking To Stand Up Against Inequality In Their Own Workplace