Kindle Edition Í The Playground PDF Ê


The Playground ❰BOOKS❯ ✭ The Playground Author Ray Bradbury – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk The Playground was part of the first hardcover edition of Ray Bradbury s legendary work Fahrenheit , published in In the story, Charles Underhill is a widower who will do anything to protect his young The Playground was part of the first hardcover edition of Ray Bradbury s legendary work Fahrenheit , published in In the story, Charles Underhill is a widower who will do anything to protect his young son Jim from the horrors of The Playground a playground which he and the boy pass by daily and the tumult of which, the activity, brings back to Charles the anguish of his own childhood The Playground, like childhood itself, is a nightmare of torment and vulnerability Charles fears his sensitive son will be destroyed there just as he almost was so many years agoUnderhill s sister Carol, who has moved in to help raise the young boy after his mother passed away, feels differently The Playground, she believes, is preparation for life, Jim will survive the experience, she feels, and he will be the better for it and equipped to deal with the rigor and obligation of adult existenceUnderhill is caught between his own fear and his sister s invocation of reason and feels paralyzed A mysterious boy calls out to him from The Playground, and seems to know all too well why Underhill is there and what the source of his agony really is A mysterious Manager also lurks to whom the strange boy directs Underhill An agreement can be made perhaps this is what the boy tells Underhill Perhaps Jim can be spared The Playground, but of course, a substitute must be found.

    Download Book Best Sellers in PDF format Jim can be spared The Playground, but of course, a substitute must be found."/>
  • Kindle Edition
  • 23 pages
  • The Playground
  • Ray Bradbury
  • English
  • 14 May 2018

About the Author: Ray Bradbury

Ray Douglas Bradbury, American novelist, short story writer, essayist, playwright, screenwriter and poet, was born August , in Waukegan, Illinois He graduated from a Los Angeles high school in Although his formal education ended there, he became a student of life, selling newspapers on LA street corners from to , spending his nights in the public library and his days at the typewriter He became a full time writer in , and contributed numerous short stories to periodicals before publishing a collection of them, Dark Carnival, in His reputation as a writer of courage and vision was established with the publication of The Martian Chronicles in , which describes the first attempts of Earth people to conquer and colonize Mars, and the unintended consequences Next came The Illustrated Man and then, in , Fahrenheit , which many consider to be Bradbury s masterpiece, a scathing indictment of censorship set in a future world where the written word is forbidden In an attempt to salvage their history and culture, a group of rebels memorize entire works of literature and philosophy as their books are burned by the totalitarian state Other works include The October Country, Dandelion Wine, A Medicine for Melancholy, Something Wicked This Way Comes, I Sing the Body Electric , Quicker Than the Eye, and Driving Blind In all, Bradbury has publishedthan thirty books, close to short stories, and numerous poems, essays, and plays His short stories have appeared inthan , school curriculum recommended reading anthologies Ray Bradbury s work has been included in four Best American Short Story collections He has been awarded the O Henry Memorial Award, the Benjamin Franklin Award, the World Fantasy Award for Lifetime Achievement, the Grand Master Award from the Science Fiction Writers of America, the PEN Center USA West Lifetime Achievement Award, among others In November , the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters was conferred upon Mr Bradbury at the National Book Awards Ceremony in New York City Ray Bradbury has never confined his vision to the purely literary He has been nominated for an Academy Award for his animated film Icarus Montgolfier Wright , and has won an Emmy Award for his teleplay of The Halloween Tree He adapted sixty five of his stories for television s Ray Bradbury Theater He was the creative consultant on the United States Pavilion at the New York World s Fair In he created the interior metaphors for the Spaceship Earth display at Epcot Center, Disney World, and later contributed to the conception of the Orbitron space ride at Euro Disney, France Married since , Mr Bradbury and his wife Maggie lived in Los Angeles with their numerous cats Together, they raised four daughters and had eight grandchildren Sadly, Maggie passed away in November of On the occasion of his th birthday in August , Bradbury said, The great fun in my life has been getting up every morning and rushing to the typewriter because some new idea has hit me The feeling I have every day is very much the same as it was when I was twelve In any event, here I am, eighty years old, feeling no different, full of a great sense of joy, and glad for the long life that has been allowed me I have good plans for the next ten or twenty years, and I hope you ll come along.



10 thoughts on “The Playground

  1. Lyn Lyn says:

    Ray Bradbury has a mystic connection to childhood.Not to say that he is a writer of children s stories, a conveyer of fun in the sun and a chronicler of innocence Bradbury documents the autumnal child, that channel towards adulthood that remains long after the ascent to older age has been accomplished He can go backwards, traveling back along that ancient and lost tunnel to the fears, apprehensions, and collective horrors of growing up and see again from a child s perspective the high mountain Ray Bradbury has a mystic connection to childhood.Not to say that he is a writer of children s stories, a conveyer of fun in the sun and a chronicler of innocence Bradbury documents the autumnal child, that channel towards adulthood that remains long after the ascent to older age has been accomplished He can go backwards, traveling back along that ancient and lost tunnel to the fears, apprehensions, and collective horrors of growing up and see again from a child s perspective the high mountain yet to be climbed.In The Playground, first published in 1953, Ray has used this unique gift to illustrate both ends of the path the adult looking back to how scary being a child can be, and wanting to protect that younger self, and also the fright of the child himself Bradbury describes a scene where a father, a recent widower, looks on with fear and trepidation as his young son is first confronted with the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, but on a playground where these fears are manifested in scraped knees, bloody noses and chased tears.Bradbury then goes one step further and creates a situation where the father has a choice, a real and then a paranormal decision to guard his boy against the dread of a violent and uncaring childhood

  2. Nataliya Nataliya says:

    If you re a parent or an older sibling, you probably know this feeling very well the intense protectiveness and the fear of letting the child step out alone into the big and cruel world After all, in the words of Stephen King,The world had teeth and it could bite you with them anytime it wantedReally Who said childhood was the best time of life When in reality it was the most terrible, the most merciless era, the barbaric time when there were no police to protect you, only parents If you re a parent or an older sibling, you probably know this feeling very well the intense protectiveness and the fear of letting the child step out alone into the big and cruel world After all, in the words of Stephen King,The world had teeth and it could bite you with them anytime it wantedReally Who said childhood was the best time of life When in reality it was the most terrible, the most merciless era, the barbaric time when there were no police to protect you, only parents preoccupied with themselves and their taller world. Ray Bradbury may be the master of nostalgia especially for the coexisting magic and sadness of childhood which he so well shows through the prism of enchantment and loneliness and longing Yeah, not in this story The Playground is the dreaded Chuckie to your childhood s Kens and Barbies and cute Monster Trucks It is the embodiment of the parents fear for their children s happiness and security Mr Underhill really loves his three year old son Jim Jim is the only thing left for him to care about after the death of his wife And Jim is about old enough to start playing at the Playground, the place that fills Mr Underhill with maybe unreasonablesinking and hollow fear Because his own memories of childhood are not of the idyllic happy time, no Sir Because he d rather sacrifice himself than watch his son go through the meatgrinder that obviously scarred him in the past To be beaten from playground to kindergarten, to grammar school, to junior high, to high school If he was lucky, in high school, the beatings and sadisms would refine themselves, the sea of blood and spittle would drain back down the shore of years and Jim would be left upon the edge of maturity, with God knows what outlook to the future, with a desire, perhaps, to be a wolf among wolves, a dog among dogs, a fiend among fiends But there was enough of that in the world, already. I found this short story to resonate with me to a point I don t have kids, but I have a brother younger than me by close to a decade I remember how scary it was to drop him off at school for his first day away from homeunlike me, he has not been through the meatgrinder of post Soviet kindergarten yearsand watch the desperate scared look in his eyes I remember how scary it was then years later, he found the unexpected steel in his spine to stand up for what he thinks is right regardless of whether his views were shared by his classmates, and treating the schoolyard bullied with strength and dignity that suddenly showed all of my family what an amazing young man he s growing up to be I remember how I always wanted to shield him from the world that has teeth and how beautifully he has done without our protection, how he did not need a well intentioned guiding hand, how he used the meanness of the world to grow up to be a very decent man.And remembering all of that, painful as it was to let go and watch the child learn to navigate the big scary world, I feel all the sympathy for Bradbury s Mr Underhilland wishing that I could tell him that it would all be okay, that we all need to eventually face the world and, painful as it may be, let the ones we love face it, tooThat ultimately it will all be okay But Mr Underhill may not heed my advice Because sometimes self sacrifice is the only way you can cope, the only way you can show love And I will watch him from the distance, from outside the Playground, with sadness and sympathy Thank God, childhood was over and done for him Nopinchings, bruisings, senseless passions and shattered dreams.

  3. Mara Mara says:

    This just in it turns out that kids can be monstrously terrible to each other Feel free to take a moment to integrate this revelation into your heretofore innocent worldview How did I come to know this terrifying secret From Ray Bradbury of course Although I do have this weird blank spot in my memory for the duration of what should have been my middle school years, but let s ignore that for now The Playground available for FREE on audible manages to pack a walloping cr This just in it turns out that kids can be monstrously terrible to each other Feel free to take a moment to integrate this revelation into your heretofore innocent worldview How did I come to know this terrifying secret From Ray Bradbury of course Although I do have this weird blank spot in my memory for the duration of what should have been my middle school years, but let s ignore that for now The Playground available for FREE on audible manages to pack a walloping creepiness punch into a short story of a father troubled by his memories of his time at the playground, and what such an environment an immense iron industry whose sole product was pain, sadism and sorrow might entail for his young son

  4. Bark Bark says:

    This is a super short FREE audio Audible that manages to create a familiar scenario with a dastardly twist It reminded me of the best sort of Twilight Zone episode This is a creeptastic, atmospheric tale about a neurotic man doing his best to save his young son from the trauma that surely awaits him at the playground.Though I could feel his pain, the father was a bit of a mess and I felt sorry for him and the kid Let the kid be a kid, I wanted to scream, but damn if that man listened to me This is a super short FREE audio Audible that manages to create a familiar scenario with a dastardly twist It reminded me of the best sort of Twilight Zone episode This is a creeptastic, atmospheric tale about a neurotic man doing his best to save his young son from the trauma that surely awaits him at the playground.Though I could feel his pain, the father was a bit of a mess and I felt sorry for him and the kid Let the kid be a kid, I wanted to scream, but damn if that man listened to me I mean, it s not like the playground had one of these

  5. Char Char says:

    This was a nice creepy short story and it s available for free on Audible Bradbury s wonderful prose comes right on through, even though the story isn t long In about 45 minutes, I was suitably creeped out and it didn t cost me a dime.

  6. Andrew Obrigewitsch Andrew Obrigewitsch says:

    I have to admit I am not a fan of Bradbury at all I thought Fahrenheit 451 was a weak watered down version of 1984 with cardboard cutout characters And I felt the Martian story collection was just boring But this story is haunting and evocative I guess will have to give Bradbury another chance.

  7. Raeden Zen Raeden Zen says:

    You ll Never View Childhood or Parenthood the Same After This When you have two precious bits of porcelain and one is broken and the other, the last one, remains, where can you find the time to be objective, to be immensely calm, to be anything else but concerned No, he thought, walking slowly, in the hall, there seems to be nothing I can do except go on being afraid and being afraid of being afraid Charles UnderhillDo you remember what it was like to be a kid The fears of children are vari You ll Never View Childhood or Parenthood the Same After This When you have two precious bits of porcelain and one is broken and the other, the last one, remains, where can you find the time to be objective, to be immensely calm, to be anything else but concerned No, he thought, walking slowly, in the hall, there seems to be nothing I can do except go on being afraid and being afraid of being afraid Charles UnderhillDo you remember what it was like to be a kid The fears of children are varied and this novelette by Ray Bradbury crystallizes a child and a parent s fears in a tight, disturbing, trippy story that will send a shiver up your spine Are all playgrounds like this Underhill said Some, replied the boy on the playground Maybe this is the only one like this Maybe it s just how you look at it, Charlie Things are what you want them to be And in this story, the Playground is hell, the place where children go to be bullied and beaten, and it is this fate, that of living a childhood of torment, that Charlie wants to save his son from experiencing The bottom line Mr Bradbury takes the traditional viewpoint that childhood is the best time of our lives and flips this notion on its head, holding a mirror to the reader that says, No, it isn t Here s why This was my first Ray Bradbury story and it won t be the last

  8. Stoney Setzer Stoney Setzer says:

    Ray Bradbury is one of my all time favorite authors, and this is the first of his works to be made available as an e book Some people have noted that The Playground is dark and disturbing I can t deny that However, it is very well written, to the point that the dark and disturbing is made palatable This story will grab your attention and never let go until the final word I wouldn t necessarily recommend it for someone who has never read Bradbury before, but if you re already familiar with Ray Bradbury is one of my all time favorite authors, and this is the first of his works to be made available as an e book Some people have noted that The Playground is dark and disturbing I can t deny that However, it is very well written, to the point that the dark and disturbing is made palatable This story will grab your attention and never let go until the final word I wouldn t necessarily recommend it for someone who has never read Bradbury before, but if you re already familiar with his work, you will enjoy this

  9. Mohammed Algarawi Mohammed Algarawi says:

    If you know me personally, then you know that I love me some depressing dark dystopian literature.I love how Ray Bradbury can make something as cheery and happy as a children playground the most depressing darkest pit in the world.Absolutely an amazing book If you read Fahrenheit 451 and liked it, then you ll love this one

  10. Christopher Christopher says:

    Not as creepy as some other Bradbury, though I was reminded of the merry go round and carnival in Something Wicked This Way Comes when thinking about the Playground and the person who runs it.

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