Novas Cosmicómicas PDF/EPUB Ê Paperback


    Novas Cosmicómicas PDF/EPUB Ê Paperback They disport themselves among galaxies, experience the solidification of planets, move from aquatic to terrestrial existence, play games with hydrogen atoms, and have a love lifeDuring the course of these stories Calvino toys with continuous creation, the transformation of matter, and the expanding and contracting reaches of space and time He succeeds in relating complex scientific concepts to the ordinary reactions of common humanityWilliam Weaver s excellent translation won a National Book AwardNaturally, we were all there, old Qfwfq said, where else could we have been Nobody knew then that there could be space Or time either what use did we have for time, packed in there like sardines."/>
  • Paperback
  • 232 pages
  • Novas Cosmicómicas
  • Italo Calvino
  • Portuguese
  • 11 February 2018
  • 9726952247 Edition Language Portuguese Characters

10 thoughts on “Novas Cosmicómicas

  1. Ahmad Sharabiani Ahmad Sharabiani says:

    Le Cosmicomiche Cosmicomics, Italo CalvinoCosmicomics is a collection of twelve short stories by Italo Calvino first published in Italian in 1965 and in English in 1968 Each story takes a scientific fact though sometimes a falsehood by today s understanding , and builds an imaginative story around it The Distance of the Moon, the first and probably the best known story Calvino takes the fact that the Moon used to be much closer to the Earth, and builds a story about a love triangle among Le Cosmicomiche Cosmicomics, Italo CalvinoCosmicomics is a collection of twelve short stories by Italo Calvino first published in Italian in 1965 and in English in 1968 Each story takes a scientific fact though sometimes a falsehood by today s understanding , and builds an imaginative story around it The Distance of the Moon, the first and probably the best known story Calvino takes the fact that the Moon used to be much closer to the Earth, and builds a story about a love triangle among people who used to jump between the Earth and the Moon, in which lovers drift apart as the Moon recedes.At Daybreak Life before matter condenses.A Sign in Space The idea that the galaxy slowly revolves becomes a story about a being who is desperate to leave behind some unique sign of his existence This story also is a direct illustration of one of the tenets of postmodern theory that the sign is not the thing it signifies, nor can one claim to fully or properly describe a thing or an idea with a word or other symbol.All at One Point The fact that all matter and creation used to exist in a single point Naturally, we were all there old Qfwfq said where else could we have been Nobody knew then that there could be space Or time either what use did we have for time, packed in there like sardines Without Colors Before there was an atmosphere, everything was the same shade of gray As the atmosphere appears, so do colors The novelty scares off Ayl, Qfwfq s love interest.Games Without End A galactic game of marbles back before the universe had formed muchthan particles.The Aquatic Uncle A tale on the fact that at one stage in evolution animals left the sea and came to live on land The story is about a family living on land that is a bit ashamed of their old uncle who still lives in the sea, refusing to come ashore like civilized people.How Much Shall We Bet A story about betting on the long term evolution of mankind.The Dinosaurs How some dinosaurs lived after most of them had become extinct, and how it felt to be that last existing dinosaur in an age where all the current mammals feared his kind as demons.The Form of Space As the unnamed narrator falls through space, he cannot help but notice that his trajectory is parallel to that of a beautiful woman, Ursula H x, and that of lieutenant Feni, who is also in love with Ursula The narrator dreams of the shape of space changing, so that he may touch Ursula or fight with Feni.The Light Years The unnamed narrator looking at other galaxies, and spotting one with a sign pointed right at him saying I saw you Given that there s a gulf of 100,000,000 light years, he checks his diary to find out what he had been doing that day, and finds out that it was something he wished to hide Then he starts to worry.The Spiral A story about life as a mollusc, and the nature of love and writing 2003 1380 198 1382 1387 9647359152 20 1383 155 19651380 1383


  2. Nilesh Kashyap Nilesh Kashyap says:

    FUCKING MINDFUCK I became aware of two facts after reading this book Sometime people can be way over creative And sometime this over creativity can be real pain in the umm let s go with rear.So, what is cosmicomics I may say it is comics of the universe it is book of twelve short stories, with setting in all across the universe and from time even before big bang to present day, and telling us the story of evolution of the universe.But that is about something written on the pages of th FUCKING MINDFUCK I became aware of two facts after reading this book Sometime people can be way over creative And sometime this over creativity can be real pain in the umm let s go with rear.So, what is cosmicomics I may say it is comics of the universe it is book of twelve short stories, with setting in all across the universe and from time even before big bang to present day, and telling us the story of evolution of the universe.But that is about something written on the pages of this book, but not what the book itself is This book is stupendous blast of creativity Well, creative is a word short of describing this book.Where shall I begin Maybe with the fact that, this book cannot be tied down to a particular genre Nope I don t think such trivial things such as, genre existed for Calvino This book is everything ranging from magical realism, science fiction, and philosophy Or maybe with the fact that, there are no humans in this book Yes, you got it right no humans and please, no aliens either.Well, we have old Qfwfq as our narrator of the stories And what is Qfwfq I don t know and looks like Calvino also never decided what is Qfwfq But collecting from the stories, he is some kind of anthropomorphized shape shifter He is dinosaur in one story and mollusc in another And he has been there even before universe came into existence Qfwfq What kind of name is that Let me tell you that Qfwfq is the least strange name How about Captain Vhd Vhd, Granny Bb b, Mr Hnw, Uncle N ba N ga, little Xlthlx, Dean k yK And there are manynames, that look like mathematical formula and I don t even know how to type them.Have you started realising the strangeness of this book But the real deal of being strange begins with the stories.Each stories begins with a scientific fact followed by a story developed around that fact, narrated by our very own old Qfwfq.First story, The Distance of the Moon starts like this At one time, according to Sir George H Darwin, the Moon was very close to the Earth Then the tides gradually pushed her far away the tides that the Moon herself causes in the Earth s waters, where the Earth slowly loses energy. How well I know old Qfwfq cried, the rest of you can t remember, but I can We had her on top of us all the time, that enormous Moon when she was full nights as bright as day, but with a butter colored light it looked as if she were going to crush us And in the next page There were nights when the Moon was full and very, very low, and the tide was so high that the Moon missed a ducking in the sea by a hair s breadth well, let s say a few yards anyway Climb up on the Moon Of course we did All you had to do was row out to it in a boat and, when you were underneath, prop a ladder against her and scramble up.Climbed up on the moon like this Easy peasy, eh Not so easy What, you got a question Let Qfwfq complete that for you. Now, you will ask me what in the world we went up on the Moon for I ll explain it to you We went to collect theIn simple words, Calvino leaves no stone unturned.But, a big but, these are the things that surround the story, at the center of this is a love triangle Yes a love triangle and this story has very sad and heart breaking end Powerful ending, that will not make you cry but make you think, what loving and being loved is about Calvino packs a good amount of humour in each story, and many underlying themes, one story is about a person who is too self conscious and many stories have characters who are laggards, who refuse to accept the change that occurs in the universe Now tell me, how much creativity, strangeness, humour, drama, philosophy can be packed in a 15 page story You will be surprised, that is all I can say.Now with so much ofeverythingin every story starts the problem of being pain in the umm rear.With so much richness in the stories and every story being completely different, it becomes hard to absorb the stories I read four stories on first day, and by the time I finished fourth, I did not have stamina to read a single wordI was drained, I was puzzled I sat wondering, what was that I just read What the fuck was that different situation but the same question Second day, I thought I m ready to read any amount of story Well, thinking and reality are two different things, so it happened I was again wrong I somehow finished the book that day, but ended up missing all the fun Yeah, that is something like my reading experience of this book, that punch definitely signifies Calvino s over creativity What I m trying to say is that these stories took a little time to sink in, and can be enjoyed most if read slowly with wide gap between reading of two stories It will make a lotsense when I tell you that I rated this book with 3 stars on the day I finished it, 4 stars a week later and 5 stars after penning down this review.Pheww That s it Now that I m done, I guess that the first two words of my review will make a lotsense to you


  3. Steven Godin Steven Godin says:

    Twelve dazzling stories from Calvino, where his ambition here was to create a ludic fiction that could reflect complex advances in science without losing his playful nature and sense of magic and lightness The stories he wrote were direct attempts to assimilate new thinking in cosmology in recognisably human and comic dimensions.Calvino prefaces his stories with a fact or hypothesis about the universe, then he moves on to get inside these vast abstractions, with his trademark qualities that Twelve dazzling stories from Calvino, where his ambition here was to create a ludic fiction that could reflect complex advances in science without losing his playful nature and sense of magic and lightness The stories he wrote were direct attempts to assimilate new thinking in cosmology in recognisably human and comic dimensions.Calvino prefaces his stories with a fact or hypothesis about the universe, then he moves on to get inside these vast abstractions, with his trademark qualities that give them a recognisable voice, which twists around the reader with a nimble and often humorous plot Through his frequent fumbling narrator the unpronounceable Qfwfq, Calvino makes the argument that there is no corner of the cosmos that cannot be enlightened by human imagination And as imaginative writers go, Calvino was up there with the bestof them Trying to describe such a diverse and entertaining mix, in which he wrestles with chaos and order, the profound and the absurd, is enough to send ones head spinning full of stars Who else could have come up with idea of scooping milk from the moon, and grumbling even before theBig Bang Calvino simply had no boundaries, he could go off in all directions, crossing the literary frontier into uncharted places to show anything is possible, if one simply opens the flood gates of the mind How does one simply lump Calvino into a single category it s almost impossible.Although this wasn t the Complete Cosmicomics which featuresstories plucked from other Calvino books , these original 12 tales werethan enough to enter Calvino s Universe and come out the other side with sheer delight Even though this was my 8th Calvino, he s like a jack in the box that never gets boring, no matter how many times you open the lid Faves A Sign in SpaceWithout ColorsThe Aquatic UncleThe Light Years


  4. Bradley Bradley says:

    This one pretty much floored me The scope and the way this was written kinda blew my mind.What do I mean Well, it s one hell of an accomplished SF encompassing all time and space from a single viewpoint in what may as well be god but isn t It s a love story with a very complicated relationship of an alien with another alien, it s a love story with time, physics, genetics, and all sorts of real math I will admit that a very great deal of my enjoyment of this novel stems from the fact th This one pretty much floored me The scope and the way this was written kinda blew my mind.What do I mean Well, it s one hell of an accomplished SF encompassing all time and space from a single viewpoint in what may as well be god but isn t It s a love story with a very complicated relationship of an alien with another alien, it s a love story with time, physics, genetics, and all sorts of real math I will admit that a very great deal of my enjoyment of this novel stems from the fact that I m conversant with real science in a big way and this book incorporates it all very heavily in the narrative.The book is kinda like this think of five or six hella great popular science writers, turn them into short story writers, let it have the feel of Marvel or DC cosmic stage stories, and then have it feel right at home with Neil Gaiman s Sandman.I m not joking It s really that good and that odd And while the science bits and how it s written is very heavy in a way, I don t think it overwhelms the actual stories at all It s unusual and it s very smart, but I wouldn t let that deter you from reading it Indeed, I think everyone should read this and have it be a solid staple of the mind.My only complaint might be a bit idiotic I really think these stories would translate perfectly into a real comic I know it s kinda implied in the title, but still I think it would be improved, making it evenreadable and brilliant that is, assuming that the artist is up to snuff


  5. Garima Garima says:

    Qfwfq Been there, Seen that, done that.Been where Where the distance of the moon from the ocean was just a ladder away Seen what The formation of galaxies, A colorless world, A time when there was no concept of time.Done what Lived on the nebulae, Lived as a dinosaur, fallen in love with a tadpole.A literary cosmos made up of staggering imagination, Calvino s Cosmicomics exceeded the expectations I always have before reading any of his books and it makes me evenproud of declaring him Qfwfq Been there, Seen that, done that.Been where Where the distance of the moon from the ocean was just a ladder away Seen what The formation of galaxies, A colorless world, A time when there was no concept of time.Done what Lived on the nebulae, Lived as a dinosaur, fallen in love with a tadpole.A literary cosmos made up of staggering imagination, Calvino s Cosmicomics exceeded the expectations I always have before reading any of his books and it makes me evenproud of declaring him as my favorite writer A collection of 12 short stories, written by taking cue from random scientific facts theories and re telling of the fragmented tales about evolution of universe through the eyes of our narrator, Qfwfq, who had been a ubiquitous witness as well as part of everything since the universe was created Sounds quite ambitious, especially taking the short story format, but that s where Calvino s talent shines the brightest The relationship established between various scientific concepts, bizarre living beings and their lives thereof, presents a witty commentary on understanding of the environment and coming to terms with innumerable and inevitable changes that takes place in our lives in natural as well as unnatural or uncalled waysCompared to the uncertainties of earth and air, lagoons and seas and oceans represented a future with security.Also there is a subtle social commentary about the nature of human beings who acknowledge world not as one but as a society governed by numerous borders and boundaries and a fine distinction is sited as to who is who according to the place they belongs toBut the others also had wronged the Z zus, to begin with, by calling them immigrants, on the pretext that, since the others had been there first, the Z zus had come later This was mere unfounded prejudice that seems obvious to me because neither before nor after existed, nor any place to immigrate from, but there were those who insisted that the concept of immigrant could be understood in the abstract, outside of space and time. But most importantly, Calvino has presented a poignant and humorous take on humanly nature, feelings and emotions without employing any humans in his narrative yet there are titles and conceptions which constitute a human worldThere were three of them an aunt and two uncles, all three very tall and practically identical we never really understood which uncle was the husband and which the brother, or exactly how they were related to us in those days there were many things that were left vague. All the stories accentuates a particular feature of this cosmos in a highly skillful way wherein Calvino has dilated a single idea into astounding proportions of ace story telling and that s why I can t really pick a favorite story of mine The names of the characters, especially Qfwfq are particularly interesting According to wikiThe name Qfwfq is a palindrome The name may be an allusion to the second law of thermodynamics substituting for f gives Q W Q, which describes a heat engine.Coming from a non science background I can t really grasp all these scientific concepts in their entirety but still marvel at the extent to which Calvino experimented and came up with such brilliant feat of literature This review or rather my gushy ramblings might convey a little about this book andabout my love for Calvino, so I highly recommend adefinite and fantastic review by Stephen M along with reading this book I must add that past and future were vague terms for me, and I couldn t make much distinction between them my memory didn t extend beyond the interminable present of our parallel fall.


  6. Stephen M Stephen M says:

    This is a wonderful set of short stories which comes as no surprise from the Cuban born, Italian Italo Calvino I had previously read If on a Winter s Night A Traveler and Invisible Cities, both I highly recommend, and enjoyed both of them immensely I once heard about the vast differences between all of Calvino s novels that certainly seems true, each one of those books bare vague resemblances to one another the similarities residing in minor things like, short story format, magical realist e This is a wonderful set of short stories which comes as no surprise from the Cuban born, Italian Italo Calvino I had previously read If on a Winter s Night A Traveler and Invisible Cities, both I highly recommend, and enjoyed both of them immensely I once heard about the vast differences between all of Calvino s novels that certainly seems true, each one of those books bare vague resemblances to one another the similarities residing in minor things like, short story format, magical realist elements and gorgeous prose Ultimately, Calvino is one of my favorite authors because he can take nearly any premise and breath wonderful imaginative life into them If nothing else, I come away with such vivid and delightful images that I can t help but think he was something of a genius at least with that aspect of writing which I find to be the hardest Any one and their mom can write some poetically tinged block of prose and send it on its way, but it takes a little something extra to create a literary world, living and breathing with the perfect amount of detail it needs, complete unto itself, full of imaginative wonder Calvino, most especially has a knack for these set pieces The best example of that comes in the first story of this collection.Is it a spoiler to describe the first story Can you spoil a short story collection Well, if so, you ve been warned The entire book follows poor Qwfwq, if read literally, he is some sort of shape shifter across species as well as subatomic particles as he experiences the universe at varying times from the moment of its creation, to the development of matter, to the formation of the earth Each story is prefaced with an italicized section detailing a certain scientific theory or maxim The first, called The Distance from the Moon, has a theory formulated by George H Darwin, the famed Charles Darwin s son The prediction is in regards to the origin and formation of the moon At the time of the writing of Cosmicomics, it was believed that the moon was once very close to the earth and that it slowly drifted away from the earth in its orbit Calvino imagines a strange tribe of some sort of half human, half fish type creatures that harvest the moon for the milk that it has They ride on a boat across the ocean, where the moon gets closest to the earth They have to climb a ladder and jump, lingering for a moment between the gravitational pulls of both surfaces until the point where the gravity of the moon overtakes the gravity of the earth and the person is pulled towards the moon Calvino s description of the ocean from that point of view is stunning Imagine the sea above you, glistening, with the boat and the others upside down, hanging like a bunch of grapes from the vine The rest of the story plays with this conceit This story may be the longest, and it is his most effective It even follows a strict three act structure with inciting incident, dark night of the soul and denouement I was impressed that this section, which is packed full of mother Lacanian ideas could also be formally compact More than just that, however, is what permeates through all of these stories In all of them, Calvino s imagination shines If you let it, it will take you up in its wonderful world The entire collection is a conjunction of fantasy, science, magical realism and realist emotions One story talks of a left over dinosaur after the others went extinct Calvino tells a story about social ostracism and conflicted identity There is a story about the steady state theory of the universe, the theory all but rejected now In which the character Qwfwq chases another character, Pwfwp throughout the universe He finally notices that he can see the back of his own head in front of Pwfwp, Pwfwp is actually chasing Qwfwq Until he notices that there is an infinite number of Q s chasing P s and vice versa From Q s perspective, he is chasing P, but from P s perspective, P is chasing Q.This is a prime example of Calvino s overall intention with the work He wants to impress upon the reader the arbitrary nature of privileging perspective In an interview within a book called The Uses of Literature Essays, Calvino says thatRobbe Grillet came out with a bitter attack on anthropomorphism, against the writer who still humanized the landscape It is not that Robbe Grillet s argument didn t convince me It is just that in the course of writing I have come to take the oppostire route in stories that are a positive delirium of anthropomorphism, of the impossibility of thinking about the world except in terms of human figures I multiplied his eyes and his nose in every direction until he no longer knows who he isThe point of each story is to simultaneously laugh at how ridiculous it is to compare evolution to human social interaction, yet at the same time indulge, because how else do we know about the world around us In Cosmicomics there is a particular sadness in each story, a loss and tragedy of understanding Even the signs which we take to be words begins to break down, as the meanings of words proliferate and destabilizeI realized that with what seemed a casual jumple of words I had hit on an infinite reserve of new combinations among the signs which compact, opaque, uniform reality would use to disguise its monotony, and I realized that perhaps the race toward the future, the race I had been the first to foresee and desire, tended only through time and space toward a crumbling into alternatives like this, until it would dissolve in a geometry of invisible triangles and ricochets like the course of a football among the white lines of a field as I tried to imagine them, drawn at the bottom of the luminous vortex of the planetary systems, deciphering the numbers marked on the chests and backs of the players at night, unrecognizable in the distanceHe takes anthropocentrism to its logical extreme By applying human characteristic to even the most absurd of things subatomic particles and the original point of matter from which the big bang sprung he exposes it this humanizing for the absurdity it is While reading all these stories, I couldn t stop thinking about the sheer incomprehensibility of the universe From its most minute particles to its cosmic grandiosity, we are stuck amid an ocean of unknowability the basis for our existence only to be reified in arbitrary metaphors even string theorists will tell you that strings are just the best metaphor they came conjure and we are stuck in this self privileged perspective by which we interact with the universe I think about the incredibly miniature, the infinite regress of sub atomic matter and the indomitable vastness of a star, not even ours, ours isn t even that large and my head begins to spin In every story, Calvino harps on this inability for any of us to really understand the incredible nature of the universe I have no way of even picturing how vast the universe is the speed of light 186,000 miles per second still takes some 100 million years to travel between stars If an atom were extrapolated to the size of a solar system, a string would be the size of a tree on earth I struggle to even conceive of this and all the while I envy the certainty of preachers, religious fundamentalists or any person with a disposition for staunch certainty They have, within their understanding, this entire universe, which we lack the vocabulary and imagination to even properly represent, subsumed under a single, perfect explanation It causes them not a single shred of doubt or uncertainty it is completely beyond me My only solace is indulging in what I love reading, writing, learning, and most especially literature, like this beautiful book I am overcome with gratitude and astonishment for having a brain and consciousness capable of appreciating this ever confounding reality we call home and Calvino, for making it so damn wonderful and fun


  7. K.D. Absolutely K.D. Absolutely says:

    Twelve totally enchanting tales about the evolution of the universe This book is a good set of fanciful stories that a father can use to answer his son s never ending questions about the moon, the sun and everything up in the sky This is my third book by Italo Calvino and he still to disappoint me Like Milan Kundera, he also does not re write himself He was a league of his own writing about a unfinished manuscript being read by you, the reader in If on a winter s night a traveler. He loo Twelve totally enchanting tales about the evolution of the universe This book is a good set of fanciful stories that a father can use to answer his son s never ending questions about the moon, the sun and everything up in the sky This is my third book by Italo Calvino and he still to disappoint me Like Milan Kundera, he also does not re write himself He was a league of his own writing about a unfinished manuscript being read by you, the reader in If on a winter s night a traveler. He looked back and went medieval and talked about tarot cards in A Castle of Crossed Destinies. Now, he looked up in the sky, brought out his astronomy book and wrote a book belonging to a sci fi sub genre called intellectual fantasyhis 1965 collection of short stories, Cosmicomics.In the beginning, before the Big Bang, all the matter in the universe was concentrated in a single point As his narrator Qfwfq saysWhere else could we have been Nobody knew then that there could be space Or time either what use did we have for time, packed in there like sardinesThen Calvino tells his story about the creation of the universe just like the story in Genesis not in the way Moses Genesis being the first book of Moses but in a playful manner with his non human characters whose names are mathematical symbols or algorithms doing out of this world activities like putting ladder to climb up to the moon or throwing atoms just like how we threw balls up in the sky when we were kids Calvino s style here reminds me a lot of Salman Rushdie s brand of magical realism not using real people like G G Marquez butof make believe characters that adds to the magic and uniqueness of the story In fact, this is what Salman says about the bookI first read Cosmicomics in my early 20s, and it s a book I ve gone back to again and again It is possibly the most enjoyable story collection ever written, a book that will frequently make you laugh out loud at its mischievous mastery, capricious ingenuity and nerveMy favorite among the 12 stories is the first one The Distance of the Moon where the moon and earth are still closed to each other and men can put up a ladder to climb to the moon The close proximity of the moon and earth reminded me of the local legend told to us by our teachers here in the Philippines that there was a man who had to use a wooden mortar and pestle to remove husk from the palay and produce rice That every time he did that the sky became high and high until it became as far and high as it appears now.The books reminds me that there is no boring topic only boring novelists Who would have thought that there could still be interesting stories that can be told about the sky Especially at night, when you look up and all you can see are darkness and some small blinking tired stars There is nothing dated about the stories and because he based each story on actual astronomical facts, everything makes sense Just use your imagination and ride with Calvino in his make believe flight Probably humming a bit of Sinatra s Fly Me to the Moon might also add some spice while reading some of the stories


  8. Paul Bryant Paul Bryant says:

    I guess if there was nothing on tv and you were bored your mind might start wandering and you might possibly conceive that a civilisation of very tiny unicorns called Gzz and Tjsdfh might live up my arse but you wouldn t want to write a damn book about it, would you However thin the book might be.


  9. Madeleine Madeleine says:

    Calvino opened this beautiful little collection with The Distance of the Moon, a tale from the days when the lunar landscape could be reached with nothingthan a ladder and some well timed gymnastics, so it struck me as appropriate that I began reading Cosmicomics on the night of a full moon I had its richly resonant first two stories running through my head while driving home from work that evening The first half of my commute is a journey illuminated by the artificial lights of both Calvino opened this beautiful little collection with The Distance of the Moon, a tale from the days when the lunar landscape could be reached with nothingthan a ladder and some well timed gymnastics, so it struck me as appropriate that I began reading Cosmicomics on the night of a full moon I had its richly resonant first two stories running through my head while driving home from work that evening The first half of my commute is a journey illuminated by the artificial lights of both commerce and my fellow impatient motorists before giving way to a monotonous stretch of interstate road, offering precious few spots of gap toothed skyline that allow the evening sky to break through one of these infrequent openings offered a glimpse of the looming, swollen moon The distortion of a full lunar sphere just beginning its ascent, an engorged orb hanging so low and heavy that she could pass for the grandest part of the man made horizon, is one of my favorite displays offered by my favorite celestial phenomenon I ve had a particular affinity for the full moon ever since I discovered that unusually well lit nighttime walks were the most reliable antidote for my teenage moodiness The optical illusion that makes a low moon loom gigantically renders a familiar sight unusual, and stealing a few glances of it during my daily trek lent a tangibility to Calvino s story I wasn t expecting but didn t really surprise me This would not be the first and I sincerely doubt the last time I couldn t help but apply Calvino s vision to a real world occurrence These stories make the kind of sense that dreams do, in a way While clearly mismatched words don t rhyme upon waking as they do in nocturnal narratives and the person who represents a singular entity in sleep becomes an obviously symbolic amalgamation of strangers and forgotten friends once the dreamer is jarred into consciousness, the creation myths Calvino weaves into dazzling truths actually do hold up upon further examination, even if they do require the occasional suspension of disbelief still, who s to say the cosmos and the population that arose with it adhere to the same stringent reality we ve come to accept While the formative years of the cosmic terrain the Earth and its lunar satellite included are decidedly alien in their lack of familiar concepts just as our commonalities were novel thenYou understand It was the first time There had never been things to play with before And how could we have played With that pap of gaseous matter, the inhabitants stumbling confusion about what s going on but solid certainty that whatever s happening is important didn t require a leap of imagination to understand Calvino imbued his cast of nonhuman characters with decidedly human curiosity and incredibly human failings, which helps to ground an otherwise ethereal collection of interweaving tales in achingly relatable terms.What struck me most about this book is how actively shameful impulses have shaped and driven self aware creatures since, quite literally, there have been self aware beings in a position to affect their environment Those jealousies, those prejudices, and most of all those proud insecurities were allowed to reach a boiling point and bubbled into the external world The effects weren t always catastrophic but they did leave lasting marks on the nascent universe To consider that the universe as we know it what we know of it, anyway was crafted neither by a happy, scientifically explained accident nor the whim of just but avuncular deities, but rather some ordinary guy s selfish motives and a need to leave a cosmic I wuz here smear of existential proof is a perspective shift worth mulling over.I still maintain that this is perfection in 153 pages My second encounter with Calvino was just as fortuitous and spilled off the page into real life just as much as my first so much, in fact, that I bought another one of this books almost immediately upon finishing this one because I just want to glut myself on Calvino s unequaled prose Simply, the man reminds me of what a magical experience a good book is and why reading has been one of my favorite pastimes for as long as it has This is a quick read that demands the reader to pace him herself to properly dwell on the densely packed splendor within


  10. Andrea Andrea says:

    I read this on route to Vietnam, sad to leave my half read but weighty G del, Escher, Bach An Eternal Golden Braid at home It was strangely a related interlude, a different look at the laws underpinning our universe and our reality However the motivation of both authors was very similar how do we as humans try to understand the complexity and wonder of the constraints and possibilities inherent in the structure of our reality How does physics translate to our human experience, and how does I read this on route to Vietnam, sad to leave my half read but weighty G del, Escher, Bach An Eternal Golden Braid at home It was strangely a related interlude, a different look at the laws underpinning our universe and our reality However the motivation of both authors was very similar how do we as humans try to understand the complexity and wonder of the constraints and possibilities inherent in the structure of our reality How does physics translate to our human experience, and how does our human experience affect our translation of physics I was reminded of GEB s recursion our experience affecting our reality which ths affects our experience in this lies all possibilities within the boundaries of our physics And Calvino sees the limitless lyrical and beautiful possibilities of the human condition hope, joy, sadness, loss, yearning, lust, anger, confusion, jealousy, arrogance, love, desire all contained within our universe, which of course containes the observer.Here he presents with deft touch whimsical, delightful observations in a style where A Brief History of Time meets Alice in Wonderland This is not fantasy, this is not magical realism, it is sui generis the best term I can think of is magical science It is totally believable and so natural it seems real, not allegory.This little book is a precious gem, each facet sparkling with suprise and wonder


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Novas Cosmicómicas[Download] ✤ Novas Cosmicómicas Author Italo Calvino – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Italo Calvino s extraordinary imagination and intelligence combine here in an enchanting series of stories about the evolution of the universe He makes characters out of mathematical formulae and simp Italo Calvino s extraordinary imagination and intelligence combine here in an enchanting series of stories about the evolution of the universe He makes characters out of mathematical formulae and simple cellular structures They disport themselves among galaxies, experience the solidification of planets, move from aquatic to terrestrial existence, play games with hydrogen atoms, and have a love lifeDuring the course of these stories Calvino toys with continuous creation, the transformation of matter, and the expanding and contracting reaches of space and time He succeeds in relating complex scientific concepts to the ordinary reactions of common humanityWilliam Weaver s excellent translation won a National Book AwardNaturally, we were all there, old Qfwfq said, where else could we have been Nobody knew then that there could be space Or time either what use did we have for time, packed in there like sardines.


About the Author: Italo Calvino

Italo Calvino was born in Cuba and grew up in Italy He was a journalist and writer of short stories and novels His best known works include the Our Ancestors trilogy , the Cosmicomics collection of short stories , and the novels Invisible Cities and If On a Winter s Night a Traveler His style is not easy to classify much of his writing has an air reminiscent to that of fantastical fairy tales Our Ancestors, Cosmicomics , although sometimes his writing isrealistic and in the scenic mode of observation Difficult Loves, for example Some of his writing has been called postmodern, reflecting on literature and the act of reading, while some has been labeled magical realist, others fables, others simply modern He wrote My working method hasoften than not involved the subtraction of weight I have tried to remove weight, sometimes from people, sometimes from heavenly bodies, sometimes from cities above all I have tried to remove weight from the structure of stories and from language.