Capa Mole Í A Fenda PDF Ê


A Fenda ➹ A Fenda Download ➾ Author Doris Lessing – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Imagine uma comunidade pr hist rica exclusivamente constitu da por mulheres, que n o conhecem homens nem deles t m necessidade, e que funciona de forma quase id lica Imagine agora tudo o que poder imp Imagine uma comunidade pr hist rica exclusivamente constitu da por mulheres, que n o conhecem homens nem deles t m necessidade, e que funciona de forma quase id lica Imagine agora tudo o que poder implicar para esta tribo o nascimento de uma criatura estranha um beb do sexo masculino Esta a premissa de que Doris Lessing parte para reflectir sobre um dos temas que mais a inspiraram ao longo da sua carreira as rela es entre ambos os sexos e como afectam toda a nossa vida Com este livro, por m, Doris Lessing vai ainda mais longe, ao fazer tamb m um retrato de uma beleza desconcertante da natureza simultaneamente transit ria e imut vel dos seres humanos, com os sentimentos de ambi o, vulnerabilidade e incompletude que a caracterizam.

    Capa Mole Í A Fenda PDF Ê dos seres humanos, com os sentimentos de ambi o, vulnerabilidade e incompletude que a caracterizam."/>
  • Capa Mole
  • 207 pages
  • A Fenda
  • Doris Lessing
  • Portuguese
  • 19 January 2019
  • 9722339389

About the Author: Doris Lessing

Both of her parents were British her father, who had been crippled in World War I, was a clerk in the Imperial Bank of Persia her mother had been a nurse In , lured by the promise of getting rich through maize farming, the family moved to the British colony in Southern Rhodesia now Zimbabwe Like other women writers from southern African who did not graduate from high school such as Olive Schreiner and Nadine Gordimer , Lessing made herself into a self educated intellectual In she moved to Salisbury, where she worked as a telephone operator for a year At nineteen, she married Frank Wisdom, and later had two children A few years later, feeling trapped in a persona that she feared would destroy her, she left her family, remaining in Salisbury Soon she was drawn to the like minded members of the Left Book Club, a group of Communists who read everything, and who did not think it remarkable to read Gottfried Lessing was a central member of the group shortly after she joined, they married and had a sonDuring the postwar years, Lessing became increasingly disillusioned with the Communist movement, which she left altogether in By , Lessing had moved to London with her young son That year, she also published her first novel, The Grass Is Singing, and began her career as a professional writerIn June she received an Honorary Degree from Harvard University Also in , she visited South Africa to see her daughter and grandchildren, and to promote her autobiography It was her first visit since being forcibly removed in for her political views Ironically, she is welcomed now as a writer acclaimed for the very topics for which she was banished years agoIn she was awarded the Prince of Asturias Prize in Literature, one of Spain s most important distinctions, for her brilliant literary works in defense of freedom and Third World causes She also received the David Cohen British Literature Prize She was on the shortlist for the first Man Booker International Prize in In she was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature Extracted from the pamphlet A Reader s Guide to The Golden Notebook Under My Skin, HarperPerennial, Full text available on dorislessing.



10 thoughts on “A Fenda

  1. Carolina Carolina says:

    Now What is it about all these terrible ratings Accusations of sexism Of the text lacking quality being boring I can identify so little with previous reviews of this work that I made it a point to write a review for this one I had never read Lessing before and when I read the synopsis for this one I knew that it was just meant to be It is definitely not what I had expected I had hoped it would be a cleverer version of Herland, maybe It does share certain similarities with Gilman s sepa Now What is it about all these terrible ratings Accusations of sexism Of the text lacking quality being boring I can identify so little with previous reviews of this work that I made it a point to write a review for this one I had never read Lessing before and when I read the synopsis for this one I knew that it was just meant to be It is definitely not what I had expected I had hoped it would be a cleverer version of Herland, maybe It does share certain similarities with Gilman s separatist female utopia, such as the usage of type characters instead of actual people, which further identifies both works as fables of humanity However, The Cleft is very little like Herland as in it does not focus on the before men but instead on the after and there is close to none utopic elements in this scenario The premise is simple women came first Then one day, a boy was born They think the child s defective, but then monsters keep being born, until the baby boys start being rescued by eagles and form a community of their own on the other side of the mountain The most interesting moment in the text is precisely the beginning, gruesome and intriguing, indicating both genders as criminals against one another From there, the story assumes the shape of a quasi parody of traits generally attributed to males and females Meanwhile, to further complicate matters, the narrative is put together by a Roman senator wannabe who remarks on the earlier civilization and compares it to his own This book is clearly not preaching anything about human evolution instead, its objective is to give us food for thought in what concerns the often troublesome relations between genders Read it if you do not want to take for granted the patterns of those relations Cleft or squirt the only thing clear is that there can t be one without the other

  2. Seth T. Seth T. says:

    I did not finish this book In fact I could not It was my taste as a consumer of books that prohibited me.Oh sure, I ve set aside books before I ve even set aside books with no intention of continuing them in the future But never with as adamant a certainty that I would never again pick up the book in order to give it a second chance.Some may question my ability to judge a book based only on a partial reading, which is fair, but trust me this book is Bad.Doris Lessing s The Cleft may actuall I did not finish this book In fact I could not It was my taste as a consumer of books that prohibited me.Oh sure, I ve set aside books before I ve even set aside books with no intention of continuing them in the future But never with as adamant a certainty that I would never again pick up the book in order to give it a second chance.Some may question my ability to judge a book based only on a partial reading, which is fair, but trust me this book is Bad.Doris Lessing s The Cleft may actually be the worst book I d ever read It s not so much that the ideas expressed were repugnant or in any way offensive, butthat in the place of what we commonly refer to as writing there was instead a collection of hieroglyphic fecal matter.I had never read any of Lessing s impressive oeuvre and so to encounter this as my first taste of what by at least some accounts is a smorgasbord of delicacies was, in layman s terms, a disappointment Pacing scattered by what looks to be the onset of senility Style fourth grade chic Historical sense senseless and ahistorical Characters there were none and those impressions that threatened to become characters were never better than those cardboard standees you used to find in display windows at Suncoast Video, a Leia or Chewbacca or Boba Fett of course, none of those impressions ever really approached that sense of solidity that those corrugated paper mementos had.This book was chosen for our bookclub on the basis that mere months prior its publication, Lessing won the Nobel for literature and the synopsis made it sound like an adventurous read into gender studies It was not anything of the sort.Here we see the woman who chose the book express her disappointment in Lessing and in the Nobel committee by means of willful conflagration

  3. Cheyenne Blue Cheyenne Blue says:

    To the Nobel Prize for Literature committee of 2007 what were you smoking I read The Cleft on a flight from Sydney to San Francisco One hour into the flight, we encountered turbulence and it didn t abate for the next couple of hours The movie singular, because this was a United breaks guitars flight was crap I was trapped in my seat by the fasten seatbelts sign, and in any case even the flight crew had hit the deck in crouched position I was 70 pages into The Cleft when the turbulence To the Nobel Prize for Literature committee of 2007 what were you smoking I read The Cleft on a flight from Sydney to San Francisco One hour into the flight, we encountered turbulence and it didn t abate for the next couple of hours The movie singular, because this was a United breaks guitars flight was crap I was trapped in my seat by the fasten seatbelts sign, and in any case even the flight crew had hit the deck in crouched position I was 70 pages into The Cleft when the turbulence started, long enough to know I wasn t really enjoying it, but by then I was confined with nothing else to read as my other books were in the overhead locker That is the ONLY reason I finished it The only remotely positive thing was that there had been two drinks services before turbulence grounded the flight crew What did I hate about this It s tempting to say everything and move on to somethinginteresting, but in no particular order, I loathed The repetition Yeah, Doris, we get it If you said once, you said a gazillion times that when the clefts and the squirts started copulating the babies were different How many times do we have to read about the clefts going over the mountain to the squirts It was slow and dull The story or lack thereof Slow It was glacial See point 1 repetition I was very discomforted by the gender stereotyping Clefts are fat and lazy and unadventurous they don t even climb the nearest hill to see what s on the other side and lie around on the rocks sunning themselves Clefts look after babies Clefts instinctively know how to make a broom and clean up after the squirts Clefts have language skills but are useless in other ways Clefts are there to be raped Squirts are brave and daring and utter slobs Lucky the clefts came along and invented the broom, eh, or else they d be buried in the litter of half chewed animal bones Squirts rape clefts Squirts can t control their sexual urges Squirts communicate in grunts Did I mention that squirts rape clefts And then once the clefts are pregnant the squirts kick them out Oh yeah, there s a lot to love about this portrayal of gender Come to that, if we have a society of men and a society of women, where s the gay and lesbian love Huh Huh I hated this book And I hate United breaks guitars and the weather over the Pacific for making me read it

  4. Eileen Eileen says:

    A Review and a Few QuestionsIn June, 1992, Doris Lessing wrote an Op ed for the NY Times entitled, Questions You Should Never Ask a Writer The questions that Lessing especially does not want to hear are, What is the story really about What does it mean In other words, we must take her stories at face value and see them as just that works of her imagination, nothing .After finishing The Cleft, however, it seems impossible not to ask those questions On the surface, Lessing s latest A Review and a Few QuestionsIn June, 1992, Doris Lessing wrote an Op ed for the NY Times entitled, Questions You Should Never Ask a Writer The questions that Lessing especially does not want to hear are, What is the story really about What does it mean In other words, we must take her stories at face value and see them as just that works of her imagination, nothing .After finishing The Cleft, however, it seems impossible not to ask those questions On the surface, Lessing s latest thought provoking novel is a simple tale, told by a Roman historian during the height of the Roman Empire The historian, a male, recounts the origin of the species found in ancient written records These scrolls are based on an oral tradition handed down through the ages.In her brief preface, Lessing says that the whole story began with a question, sparked by a scientific article, stoked by the imagination The question What if the first human were a woman, not a man Suppose our ancestors were females, Clefts, born in the sea, inseminated and nurtured by it The early Clefts resemble seals, lolling around the shore, on rocks, living in peace until one gives birth to a male, or monster The fascinating narrative shifts between the myth, or legend, of the Clefts and the Monsters, and the historian s description of life in ancient Rome He dwells on gender and family issues in both time frames and invokesquestions Are females inherently strong, maternal care givers Are males basically competitive, irresponsible dreamers One of the main themes of The Cleft is that history is by nature subjective It all depends on who is writing the history books On page 136, the historian says A community, a people, must decide what sort of a chronicle must be kept We all know that in the telling and retelling of an event, or series of events, there will be as many accounts as there are tellers Lessing s historian clings to the oral tradition, passed down through memories, as most reliable Yet, he admits p 25 , What I am about to relate may be must be speculative Much of the factual material is kept locked up Our narrator laments, all this locking up and smoothing over and the suppression of the truth Which explains that by the time of ancient Rome, it was already common knowledge that the males came first So, here is my question, not for Lessing, rather for her readers, for myself Why Rome Why is the fable of the Clefts and the Monsters set against the backdrop of the Roman Empire in all its glory Couldn t the scrolls have been discovered by a 21st century historian Why is the story told by a man who despises the coliseum and its gory, violent rites, yet who admits to a voyeuristic, visceral thrill each time he attends What is the significance of the Eagle, present in the ancient myth of the Clefts as protector of the males, as well as a revered species of Rome Perhaps the answer can be found on page 216, in a passage replete with the historian s own questions regarding the empire s expansion and his personal loss of two sons to war I think of how Rome has hurt itself in our need to expand, to have I think of my two poor sons, lying somewhere in those northern forests Rome has to outleap itself, has to grow, has to reach out Why should there ever be an end to us, to Rome, to our boundaries Subject peoples may fight us, but they never can stop us I sometimes imagine how all the known world will be Roman, subject to our beneficent rule, to Roman peace, Roman laws and justice, Roman efficiency Some greater power than human guides us, leads us, points where our legions must go next And if there are those who criticize us, then I have only one reply Why, then, if we lack the qualities needed to make the whole earth flourish, why does everyone want to be a Roman citizen Why Rome, indeed Lessing has said that if she wants to write about a subject or situation, she does just that Still, there s a question I d love to ask her

  5. Betsy Betsy says:

    I expected to whip through this book but found that I needed to read it a little slower to absorb what the author was trying to convey I almost didn t finish it Around page 160, I was completely frustrated on how the book was written and decided to read some reviews to help clarify what the author was trying to do Well, I m glad I did It changed my whole attitude After one review, I realized how brilliant the author was by how realistically portraying how a Roman would have told his story I expected to whip through this book but found that I needed to read it a little slower to absorb what the author was trying to convey I almost didn t finish it Around page 160, I was completely frustrated on how the book was written and decided to read some reviews to help clarify what the author was trying to do Well, I m glad I did It changed my whole attitude After one review, I realized how brilliant the author was by how realistically portraying how a Roman would have told his story Apparently, histories written in Roman times had characteristics of abstractness, representative characters, and large amounts of speculation which were quite typical of the kinds of histories they wrote Roman histories are also known to have abrupt endings according to one review, although I didn t really get that feeling of ending abruptly.The storyline was a unique thought on how humanity began I really enjoyed the author s concept

  6. Kay Kay says:

    i m surprised this book has such a low rating on goodreads maybe i shouldn t be lessing s idea here, that women came first, and men evolved later, might be shocking or disgusting to some people this isn t a normal novel in that there aren t characters, per se, that one follows their development though lessing does give a few names to key players in her narrative the story is told by a roman historian who is sifting through documents, trying to make a cohesive story of the beginning of hu i m surprised this book has such a low rating on goodreads maybe i shouldn t be lessing s idea here, that women came first, and men evolved later, might be shocking or disgusting to some people this isn t a normal novel in that there aren t characters, per se, that one follows their development though lessing does give a few names to key players in her narrative the story is told by a roman historian who is sifting through documents, trying to make a cohesive story of the beginning of humans women are the first sex, that come out of the water, are impregnated there, and only produce women clefts then after time, monster births start appearing with tubes men these monsters are killed until their births are so frequent, and they eventually form their own colony after another time, women lose the ability to self impregnate, and a use is found for their tubes.very interesting ideas explored here i think lessing had fun with this story.my goodreads bob would like this book, i think let me know if you want to borrow it

  7. Leslie Reese Leslie Reese says:

    I think it was the idea of the book that kept me reading it.I was spurred on by my own curiosity about the premisethan the actual story that was told.

  8. Genevieve Genevieve says:

    An interesting alternative view to evolution, but at its heart it was Men are From Mars Women are from Venus meets The Lord of the Flies A quick read that seems to drive home the differences between the sexes, sometimes annoyingly so I enjoyed the narrator s viewpoint as a male in the Roman society illustrating, in a much less hit you upside the head style, that the differences remain And of course as a modern reader it causes one to consider that if not much changed between Paleolithic a An interesting alternative view to evolution, but at its heart it was Men are From Mars Women are from Venus meets The Lord of the Flies A quick read that seems to drive home the differences between the sexes, sometimes annoyingly so I enjoyed the narrator s viewpoint as a male in the Roman society illustrating, in a much less hit you upside the head style, that the differences remain And of course as a modern reader it causes one to consider that if not much changed between Paleolithic and Roman times, has there been much change up to our current state of being Not one to buy into gender stereotypes easily or willingly, I found it a bit grating at times but still thought is brought up points for consideration and discussion

  9. Dave-O Dave-O says:

    Lessing s novel proposes a new creation myth, one of a first race of females, the Clefts , that give birth to males, Monsters later, Squirts That THE CLEFT is both a clever satire of gender roles as well as a thoroughly entertaining book is because of Lessing s talent for humanizing shards of a fictional myth She does this vis a vis an elderly Roman historian who is writing his account of the history of the Clefts This makes for an interesting, if at times fractured, framing device for Lessing s novel proposes a new creation myth, one of a first race of females, the Clefts , that give birth to males, Monsters later, Squirts That THE CLEFT is both a clever satire of gender roles as well as a thoroughly entertaining book is because of Lessing s talent for humanizing shards of a fictional myth She does this vis a vis an elderly Roman historian who is writing his account of the history of the Clefts This makes for an interesting, if at times fractured, framing device for the narrative that makes the social satirelayered.As with any myth, there is violence and magic The sea from which the Clefts emerge, gives them strength as well as fertility Magnificent eagles swoop in to save the baby males from death and later, female deer allow them to suckle them in absence of mothers The discovery of the males by the females and the subsequent mating and fighting is the best part of the story As the story shifts to a second myth, the world becomes less magic and the two tribes are forced together over time.The first part seemsfocused on the females trauma of male discovery while the second,on the males yearning to explore new lands I found them to read exactly as Lessing intends as an ancient historian s interpretation of authentic ancient texts, which washumorous and just as insightful as I anticipated

  10. Ouise Ouise says:

    I liked the unusual, story telling, almost biblical style of this story You have the feeling that you are sitting near the chimney at a time when tv, radio and the internet did not exist and that you are listening to a story told by a wise elder.I also liked Doris Lessing s observation of the human nature, the description of women that are and men that do , of women that give and care about life and men that are restless and seek to discover and conquer The description of this fundamental h I liked the unusual, story telling, almost biblical style of this story You have the feeling that you are sitting near the chimney at a time when tv, radio and the internet did not exist and that you are listening to a story told by a wise elder.I also liked Doris Lessing s observation of the human nature, the description of women that are and men that do , of women that give and care about life and men that are restless and seek to discover and conquer The description of this fundamental human desire to always want to change the status quo yet the desire to come back to what one knows and comfort us.I liked, at the end of the book, the main male character s discovery of human compassion Tenderness is not a quality we associate easily with young men Life has to beat it into us, beat us softer andmalleable than our early pride allows I really liked the beginning of the book but thought that the middle part when men go to explore their island their world was too long All in all, an interesting book to read for the points mentioned above

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