Curious Myths of the Middle Ages: The Sangreal, Pope Joan,

Curious Myths of the Middle Ages: The Sangreal, Pope Joan, The Wandering Jew, and Others ❰Reading❯ ➸ Curious Myths of the Middle Ages: The Sangreal, Pope Joan, The Wandering Jew, and Others Author Sabine Baring-Gould – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk One of the most brilliant, eclectic thinkers in Victorian England, the Reverend Sabine Baring Gould was intrigued by the grotesque and often savage history of the Middle Ages The noted author and fo One of the most brilliant, eclectic thinkers in of the eBook ✓ Victorian England, the Reverend Sabine Baring Gould Curious Myths PDF/EPUB ² was intrigued by the grotesque and often savage history of the Middle Ages The noted author Myths of the PDF ✓ and folklorist s fascination with the period resulted in this absorbing compilation of vintage tales surrounding such figures as William Tell and the Man in the Moon Twenty four legendary figures among others, Saint Patrick, the Pied Piper, knights of the Holy Grail, and St George are rejuvenated in this collection for a new audience In addition to outlines of the myths, the author provides an objective analysis of their origins, relevance, and the extent of their basis in fact Fascinating sources include Christian adaptations of prehistoric legends, misinterpretations of actual events, and outright fabrications Accompanying illustrations provide a visual appreciation for these timeless classics A marvelous introduction to age old stories, this oft cited work will be of value and interest to students, scholars, and other readers.


About the Author: Sabine Baring-Gould

Sabine Baring Gould was born in the parish of the eBook ✓ of St Sidwell, Exeter The eldest son Curious Myths PDF/EPUB ² of Edward Baring Gould and his first wife, Sophia Charlotte n e Bond , he was Myths of the PDF ✓ named after a great uncle, the Arctic explorer Sir Edward Sabine Because the family spent much of his childhood travelling round Europe, most of his education was by private tutors He only spent about two years in formal schooling, first at King s College School in London then located in Somerset House and then, for a few months, at Warwick Grammar School now Warwick School Here his time was ended by a bronchial disease of the kind that was to plague him throughout his long life His father considered his ill health as a good reason for another European tourIn he was admitted to Cambridge University, earning the degrees of Bachelor of Arts in , then Master of Arts in from Clare College, Cambridge During , he became the curate at Horbury Bridge, West Riding of Yorkshire It was while acting as a curate that he met Grace Taylor, the daughter of a mill hand, then aged fourteen In the next few years they fell in love His vicar, John Sharp, arranged for Grace to live for two years with relatives in York to learn middle class manners Baring Gould, meanwhile, relocated to become perpetual curate at Dalton, near Thirsk He and Grace were married in at Wakefield Their marriage lasted until her death years later, and the couple had children, all but one of whom lived to adulthood When he buried his wife in he had carved on her tombstone the Latin motto Dimidium Animae Meae Half my SoulBaring Gould became the rector of East Mersea in Essex in and spent ten years there In his father died and he inherited the , acre km family estates of Lew Trenchard in Devon, which included the gift of the living of Lew Trenchard parish When the living became vacant in , he was able to appoint himself to it, becoming parson as well as squire He did a great deal of work restoring St Peter s Church, Lew Trenchard, and from thoroughly remodelled his home, Lew Trenchard Manor.



10 thoughts on “Curious Myths of the Middle Ages: The Sangreal, Pope Joan, The Wandering Jew, and Others

  1. Hat of Nikitich Hat of Nikitich says:

    This work does its best to discredit original folklore and mythologies by claiming they were naught but a bad influence on the later purified, Christianized versions so heavily employed by the Church to lure apagan following into the pews In fact, the author asserts their influence should have been purged from the Church, that it would have been better they be forgotten than their heathen origins taint an innocent flock Barf.I know it s from the 1890s, I get that But everything about This work does its best to discredit original folklore and mythologies by claiming they were naught but a bad influence on the later purified, Christianized versions so heavily employed by the Church to lure apagan following into the pews In fact, the author asserts their influence should have been purged from the Church, that it would have been better they be forgotten than their heathen origins taint an innocent flock Barf.I know it s from the 1890s, I get that But everything about the authorship, from the lazy scholarship to the rabid Antisemitism, is terrible, and I felt dirty mining the few gems I did from it I can t damn it as much as I d like, because it did at least preserve those few things, and when it wasn t proselytizing for the Catholic Church it was even interesting, no matter how reluctant it would seem be.Stupidest Part wherein the author randomly determines Protestantism is keeping alive various heathen practices and goes on to plainly announce Methodism as a sham cover for druidism I can t make this shit up


  2. Theresa Theresa says:

    It s my fault for not paying attention my dumb ass thought these were literally a selection of Medieval myths But no This is a religious Christian analysis of said myths I tried to read it anyway but no dice for me.


  3. Sarah Sarah says:

    2.5 starsThis was not what I had expected I had wanted to read a book of myths but this waslike an explanation of the myths It was an interesting albeit biased bit of information on a few of thepopular folktales.


  4. Scott Harris Scott Harris says:

    Baring Gould collects in one place many of the myths of Medieval England, which are likely uncommon to many contemporary readers, although some remain familiar i.e William Tell Baring Gould does an excellent job of relating these stories to the extant mythology from many ancient cultures and as such draws into question the historical veracity I found however that his eagerness to dispel the legitimacy of the myths was high strung and almost fervent He is so convinced himself that he leaves Baring Gould collects in one place many of the myths of Medieval England, which are likely uncommon to many contemporary readers, although some remain familiar i.e William Tell Baring Gould does an excellent job of relating these stories to the extant mythology from many ancient cultures and as such draws into question the historical veracity I found however that his eagerness to dispel the legitimacy of the myths was high strung and almost fervent He is so convinced himself that he leaves the reader without a sense of fairness or justice in his treatment of the material even when we are inclined to agree with him He also presumes that historical precedence precludes re occurence which can be a dangerous assumption in matters of human experience


  5. Kathryn (Nine Pages) Kathryn (Nine Pages) says:

    Review originally published on my blog,Nine Pages .In his introduction to this edition, Hardy writes that he ruthlessly abandoned the farther shores of Baring Gould s research, and I am inclined to believe that he was utterly ruthless 14 15 I have sought out copies of Baring Gould s unedited text and have found 600 page volumes where this one is 159 I found Hardy s edit of Baring Gould s original to be wonderfully readable and accessible, mostly because in this edit each story and it Review originally published on my blog,Nine Pages .In his introduction to this edition, Hardy writes that he ruthlessly abandoned the farther shores of Baring Gould s research, and I am inclined to believe that he was utterly ruthless 14 15 I have sought out copies of Baring Gould s unedited text and have found 600 page volumes where this one is 159 I found Hardy s edit of Baring Gould s original to be wonderfully readable and accessible, mostly because in this edit each story and its dissection is only a few pages long, most entries less than 10 pages, making it an easy book to read in pieces I found most of what I would want from this book the myths themselves and some information about their possible antecedents to be present in the abridged edition I have not yet and probably won t read the ponderous 600 page volume there is too muchmodern scholarship to read, and this was a library book acquisition literally picked up when the book that I came for could not be found.Please note that from now on whenever I cite Baring Gould I really mean Baring Gould filtered by Hardy because I suspect that Hardy s edit has greatly influenced my impression of this book.This is both a collection of myths and a study of myths.Although Baring Gould often points out similarities between the myth that he is telling and myths of other continents, this book is whoppingly Eurocentric, focusing most of its time on myths of Germany, France, and Great Britain somewhat understandable as Baring Gould seems to have spent most of his time in these countries but his evaluation of and the language that he uses to speak about peoples outside of Europe is often uncomfortable to a modern reader.Most of the myths that Baring Gould, an Anglican priest and hymnist, explores here elevate and presuppose a Christian worldview again, understandable given the focus on European myths of the medieval period when and where the Church hadpower andgreatly effected everyday life and given Baring Gould s own religious occupation, though again the disregard for other religions and even other branches of Protestantism than Anglican is again uncomfortable Baring Gould s view of Christianity seemsmilitant than some too his perhaps best known hymn is Onward, Christian Soldier, so his militancy doesn t surprise me either, though even that hymn has always made me uncomfortable.Some myths discussed here are stories of holy objects or people who interacted with Jesus on earth Some are about devils or portals to Hell or Purgatory Some are stories of saints or fallen Church officials A few aresecular, like the tale of Gellert or of Melusina Many are myths that have made their way if not in their entirety then in pieces or into the framework of the imagination of modern, Western consciousness The story of Gellert, for example, I knew almost exactly as Baring Gould reports it The story of the Man in the Moon I had never heard, but of course I know the phrase The barest bones of the story of Pope Joan I knew but not the particulars.Baring Gould at times comes off as stunningly condescending towards any who disagree with his assessments of the origins and meanings of these myths It need hardly be stated that the whole story of Pope Joan is fictitious and fabulous, and has not the slightest historical foundation 72.Though often he traces his assumptions through a list of sources and presuppositions, at times in this edition too often there is little to no explanation of particular statements, making me wonder if such statements were considered fact by the everyday nineteenth century literate who might have found this volume in its original printing or perhaps were facts to Hardy s readers in the 1970s For example, Baring Gould connects the English Jack and Jill to the Scandinavian Hjuki and Bil largely based on a supposed similarity between the names which seems like it could to me be coincidental and not an etymologically sound conclusion then decides that the trek of Jack and Jill up the hill and tumbling back down represents the waxing and waning of the moon because of his connection to the two Scandinavian children who are kept on the moon Past his word, there s little evidence presented here Again, Ursula is in fact none other than the Swabian goddess Ursel or H rsel H rsel to whom human sacrifices were occasionally made and who became the Venus of Venusberg, or H rselberg, who entranced and debauched Tannh user 105 I have learned being even a casual reader of Tumblr posts about etymology to be skeptical of such seemingly direct lines of etymological connection I might believe a shared etymological source for the name of the saint and the name of the goddess before I would believe a direct descent from stories of the goddess to stories of the saint especially without any proof of such, which I do not get from Baring Gould.I enjoyed the introduction to a few new European myths and further explanations of ones with which I was already passingly familiar, but much of what Baring Gould states seems like it ought to be taken with a healthy dose of salt as his biases are very much on parade here and his evidence is at times thin and his observations sometimes not backed up at all.I m waffling on a 2 or 3 on this one because his biases get in the way of what should be an enjoyable and easy review of European, largely Christian myths


  6. Kristin Kristin says:

    Really very interesting There are parts that are very obviously written from the Victorian point of view, which made me wonder how much of that interpretation was still worthwhile However, I did get to read about a bunch of myths I d never heard of before, and the parallels drawn between Jack and Jill went up the hill and Nordic myths about children in the moon and the phases of the moon were fascinating.


  7. Hayden Hayden says:

    Seemed to be have a lot of research behind it However, it wasa history of the myths than simply their telling Interesting how the medieval myths were such a strange conglomeration of Christian beliefs and pagan superstition.


  8. Fachrina Fachrina says:

    No, I didn t actually finish this It s an interesting book, nonetheless It s basically an examination of the various myths and legends found in Europe during the Middle Ages Baring Gould traces the origin of a myth and compares the various versions of the same basic myth I enjoyed the ones that I did read Unfortunately I had to return it to the library and did not feel compelled to borrow it again in order to finish.


  9. Stephen Stephen says:

    Fantastic read by a pioneering British folklorist who was also an incredibly interesting guy look him up The book came out in 1866, so its interpretation of medieval folklore isn t the final word, but nobody beats this guy for style Reads like a velvet fist to the face Charming stuff from a born storyteller.


  10. Bram van der Meij Bram van der Meij says:

    A bit simple.Probably just right for those who like it short and simple but I like things a little meatier.Maps and illustrations would have made a big difference.


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