Espejos: Una historia casi universal ePUB ½ Una


Espejos: Una historia casi universal [Epub] ➝ Espejos: Una historia casi universal Author Eduardo Galeano – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Eduardo Galeano is one of our greatest storytellers Throughout his career he has transcended genre and turned our understanding of history and reality on its head Mirrors is his latest book of wonders Eduardo Galeano is one historia casi Kindle Ó of our greatest storytellers Throughout his career he has transcended genre and turned our understanding of history and reality on its head Mirrors Espejos: Una PDF/EPUB or is his latest book of wonders, his most ambitious project since Memory of Fire that landmark recreation ofyears in the Americas Mirrors is a sometimes bawdy, sometimes irreverent, Una historia casi ePUB ↠ sometimes heart breaking unofficial history of the world seen and mirrored to us through the eyes and voices of history s unseen, unheard, and forgotten As Galeano asks, Official history has it that Vasco N ez de Balboa was the first man to see, from a summit in Panama, the two oceans at once Were the people who lived there blindTaking in , years of history, recalling the lives of artists and writers, gods and visionaries from the Garden of Eden to twenty first century New York and Mumbai, and told in hundreds of kaleidoscopic vignettes that resurrect the lives of the thinkers and the feelers, the curious, condemned for asking, rebels and losers and lovely lunatics who were and are the salt of the earth, Mirrors is a magic mosaic of our humanity.

    Espejos: Una historia casi universal ePUB ½ Una Official history has it that Vasco N ez de Balboa was the first man to see, from a summit in Panama, the two oceans at once Were the people who lived there blindTaking in , years of history, recalling the lives of artists and writers, gods and visionaries from the Garden of Eden to twenty first century New York and Mumbai, and told in hundreds of kaleidoscopic vignettes that resurrect the lives of the thinkers and the feelers, the curious, condemned for asking, rebels and losers and lovely lunatics who were and are the salt of the earth, Mirrors is a magic mosaic of our humanity."/>
  • Paperback
  • 372 pages
  • Espejos: Una historia casi universal
  • Eduardo Galeano
  • Spanish
  • 15 January 2019
  • 8432313149

About the Author: Eduardo Galeano

Eduardo Galeano was a historia casi Kindle Ó Uruguayan journalist, writer and novelist His best known works are Memoria del fuego Memory of Fire Trilogy, and Las venas abiertas de Espejos: Una PDF/EPUB or Am rica Latina Open Veins of Latin America, which have been translated into twenty languages and transcend orthodox genres combining fiction, journalism, political analysis, and history The Una historia casi ePUB ↠ author himself has proclaimed his obsession as a writer saying,I m a writer obsessed with remembering, with remembering the past of America above all and above all that of Latin America, intimate land condemned to amnesia He has received the International Human Rights Award by Global Exchange and the Stig Dagerman Prize .



10 thoughts on “Espejos: Una historia casi universal

  1. Glenn Russell Glenn Russell says:

    MIRRORS Stories of Almost Everyone contemporary Uruguayan author Eduardo Galeano s collection of hundreds and hundreds of finely constructed mini tales, two or three on every page, with such titles as Origin of Fire, Origin of Beauty, Origin of Sea Breezes, Resurrection of Vermeer, Resurrection of Arcimboldo, Mozart, Goya, Venus, Hokusai, Kipling, Nijinsky, Beethoven, Lenin, Invisible Men, Invisible Women, Palace Art in France, Origin of the Croissant, Darwin s Questions, The Gold Rush and T MIRRORS Stories of Almost Everyone contemporary Uruguayan author Eduardo Galeano s collection of hundreds and hundreds of finely constructed mini tales, two or three on every page, with such titles as Origin of Fire, Origin of Beauty, Origin of Sea Breezes, Resurrection of Vermeer, Resurrection of Arcimboldo, Mozart, Goya, Venus, Hokusai, Kipling, Nijinsky, Beethoven, Lenin, Invisible Men, Invisible Women, Palace Art in France, Origin of the Croissant, Darwin s Questions, The Gold Rush and The Insanity of Freedom Reading this book is like eating peanuts once you start, it s hard to stop not to mention, once you ve opened your heart and mind, you will want to open even wider.By way of a sampling, here are several of my favorites, featuring Eduardo s signature caustic wit and nods to the power of human magical imagination ORIGIN OF WRITINGWhen Iraq was not yet Iraq, it was the birthplace of the first written word.The words look like bird tracks Masterful hands drew them in clay with sharpened canes.Fire annihilates and rescues, kills and gives life, as do the gods, as do we Fire hardened the clay and preserved the words Thanks to fire, the clay tablets still tell what they told thousands of years ago in that land of two rivers.In our days, George W Bush, perhaps believing that writing was invented in Texas, launched with joyful impunity a war to exterminate Iraq There were thousands upon thousands of victims, and not all of them were flesh and blood A great deal of memory was murdered too Living history in the form of numerous clay tablets were stolen or destroyed by bombs.One of the tablets said We are dust and nothingAll that we do is nothan wind.PELETwo British teams were battling out the championship match The final whistle was not far off and they were still tied, when one player collided with another and fell, out cold.A stretcher carried him off and the entire medical team went to work, but the man did not come to.Minutes passed, centuries passed, and the coach was swallowing the clock, hands and all He had already used up his substitutions His boys, ten against eleven, were defending as best they could, which was not much.The coach could see defeat coming, when suddenly the team doctor ran up and cried ecstatically We did it He s coming around And in a low voice, added But he doesn t know who he is The coach went over to the player, who was babbling incoherently as he tried to get to his feet, and in his ear informed him You are Pel They won five nil Years ago in London, I heard this lie that told the truth.VAN GOGHFour uncles and a brother were art dealers, yet he managed to see but one painting in his enire life Out of admiration or pity, the sister of a friend paid four hundred francs for a work in oils, The Red Vinyard, painted in Aries.More than a century later, his works are on the financial pages of nevewspapers he never read.The priciest paintings in galleries he never set foot in,The most viewed in museums that ignored his existence,And the most admired in academies that advised him to take up another trade.Today Van Gogh decorates restaurants where no one would have served him.The clinics of doctors who would have had him committedAnd the offices of lawyers who would have locked him away KAFKAAs the drums of the first world butchery drew near, Franz Kafka wrote Metamorphosis And not long after, the war under way he wrote The Trial.They are two collective nightmares.A man awakens as an enormous cockroach and cannot fathom why, and in the end he is sweept away by a broom.Another man is arrested, charged, judged, and found guilty, and cannot fathom why, and in the end he is knifed by the executioner.In a certain way those stories, those books, continued in the pages of the newspapers, which day after day told of the progress of the war machine.The author, ghost with feverish eyes, shadow without a body wrote from the ultimate depths of anguish.He published little, practically no one read him.He departed in silence, as he had lived On his deathbed, bed of pain, he only spoke to ask the doctor Kill me, or else you are a murderer FATHER OF THE BOMBThe first bomb was tried out in the desert of New Mexico The sky caught fire and Robert Oppenheimer, who led the tests, felt proud of a job well done.But three months after the explosions at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Oppenheimer said to President Harry Truman I feel I have blood on my hands And President Truman told Secretary of State Dean Acheson I don t want to see that son of a bitch in this office ever again And please don t simply put Eduardo s magic mirror down add a mirror of your own Here is mine, a response touching on the above themes HOW GROUNDHOGS PLAY CROQUETA psychologist by the name of Brentworth proves the high level of intelligence in animals by teaching a quartet of groundhogs how to play croquet When the four groundhogs are proficient enough to have a game on their own, Brentworth invites his colleagues to join him on his screened in back porch to watch as the groundhogs play on the lawn in his backyard Brentworth chose groundhogs because of the way they can hold their mallets when they sit up on their haunches.Anyway, the groundhogs are having a good go at croquet, taking their proper turns, hitting their balls through the wickets in the proper sequence The psychologists sit in a row and watch silently except for one man at the far end, who starts sobbing uncontrollably.After a groundhogs hits his yellow ball through a wicket from a decided angle and a good twenty feed away, Brentworth shouts, What a magnificent shot The groundhogs play on The sobs from the man at the end grow louder and his body heaves You all don t know what this means, he says between heaves.After completing their game, as a sort of grand finale, the groundhogs hit all the croquet balls one by one so the balls knock against one another and form a neat row.Until now, nobody has noticed that a different white letter is painted on each of the seven brightly colored wooden ball The lineup of balls now spells a word for all to read CROQUET How clever, how very, very clever, one psychologist says.The man on the end, who is still sobbing, says, This is terrible No one understands what this means Everyone turns to look at him and he buries his face in his hands as his sobs grow even louder

  2. Mohammed Mohammed says:

    Only if you are ready to read something that may contradict your fixed historical beliefs, will you appreciate this book Figures that you thought to be infallible, victories you deemed flawless and concepts you held so dear shall all be hammered You have to forget all the so called official history you ve accumulated from formal education and state TVs.Narrated from the point view of its author, this book wasn t compiled to pay homage to warriors or to glorify kings Rather, it came into being Only if you are ready to read something that may contradict your fixed historical beliefs, will you appreciate this book Figures that you thought to be infallible, victories you deemed flawless and concepts you held so dear shall all be hammered You have to forget all the so called official history you ve accumulated from formal education and state TVs.Narrated from the point view of its author, this book wasn t compiled to pay homage to warriors or to glorify kings Rather, it came into being to do justice to slaves, women, unknown thinkers and oppressed nations On the other hand, Galeano unleashes relentless attack on imperialism, colonialism, racism, sexism , extermism and historical forgeries.What is so good about this book is that it keeps you interested through a variety of topics It talks about gods and prophets and also about atheltes and artists It mentions wars but doesn t ignore merry festivlas What s , this book is not divided into chapters but into short segements ranging from few lines to a maximum of two pages The length of the segment doesn t depend on how significant the topic is It is just how the author looks at it Believe it or not, the segment on Jesus is about half a page long while the one on Marco Polo occupiesthan one page Another thing, those sections don t give a brief account on the topics they are on Instead they are there to discuss a relevant specific aspect s whatever Galeano chose to bring up This made the book rather unfair at times, yet it made it unique in a way.You are going to find this book illuminating, this I can guarantee But be warned that it provokes digust of that wild beast called Man The one that destroys other creatures, his own kind and the planet he is living on

  3. Paris (spiritedaway) Paris (spiritedaway) says:

    Origin of the EmbraceThousands of years before its devastation, Iraq gave birth to the first love poem in world literature What I tell youLet the weaver weave into song The song, in Sumerian, told of the encounter of a goddess and a shepherd.That night, the goddess Ianna loved as if she were mortal.Dumuzi the shepherd was immortal as long as the night lasted KafkaAs the drums of the war butchery drew near, Franz Kafka wrote Metamorphosis And not long after, the war under way, he wrote The Origin of the EmbraceThousands of years before its devastation, Iraq gave birth to the first love poem in world literature What I tell youLet the weaver weave into song The song, in Sumerian, told of the encounter of a goddess and a shepherd.That night, the goddess Ianna loved as if she were mortal.Dumuzi the shepherd was immortal as long as the night lasted KafkaAs the drums of the war butchery drew near, Franz Kafka wrote Metamorphosis And not long after, the war under way, he wrote The Trial.They are two collective nightmares a man awakens as an enormous cockroach and cannot fathom why, and in the end he is swept away by a broom another man is arrested, charged, judged, and found guilty, and cannot fathom why, and in the end he is knifed by the executioner.In a certain way those stories, those books, continued in the pages of the newspapers, which day after day told of the progress of the war machine.The author, ghost with feverish eyes, shadow without a body, wrote from the ultimate depths of anguish.He published little, practically no one read him.He departed in silence, as he had lived On his deathbed, bed of pain, he only spoke to ask the doctor Kill me, or else you are a murderer

  4. Abdelmoneim Abdelmoneim says:

    The world is not respectable it is mortal, tormented, confused, deluded forever but it is shot through with beauty, with love, with glints of courage and laughter and in these, the spirit blooms timidly, and struggles to the light amid the thorns George Santayana

  5. Kirti Upreti Kirti Upreti says:

    Tormenting Agonizing Reading this book was a once in a blue moon experience Twitching brows, shortness of breath and increased pulse rate were all a part of it This book made me insomniac and if sleep blessed me at all, it was followed by anxiety attacks at odd hours in the morning that only led me to pick up the book once again So, in short, it s brilliant.Some thoughts that kept crossing my mind while reading Human civilization can be divided into two categories Stupid and Despicably Stu Tormenting Agonizing Reading this book was a once in a blue moon experience Twitching brows, shortness of breath and increased pulse rate were all a part of it This book made me insomniac and if sleep blessed me at all, it was followed by anxiety attacks at odd hours in the morning that only led me to pick up the book once again So, in short, it s brilliant.Some thoughts that kept crossing my mind while reading Human civilization can be divided into two categories Stupid and Despicably Stupid Humans are indeed the most detestable of all species The despot vanquishes the weak The tolerance of the weak breaks down at a point They rebel and the weak now becomes a despot for the weaker It just reminds me of something I read in the book Sex at Dawn The Prehistoric Origins of Modern SexualityWe are, at base, a jealous, possessive, murderous and deceitful species just barely saved by our precarious capacity to rise above our dark essence and and submit to civilized proprietySo when AI rises to power, we shouldn t be shocked if it decimates us to extinction We deserve it If the AI is intelligent enough, it should have figured that out by now.Now, about women We blame patriarchy for the second citizenship the society assigns to women But patriarchy is a social construct which has stemmed from the deep seated misogyny that pervades all cultures and societies irrespective Women are hated for being women, by men and women alike, no matter what they do to change their hearts The fables, the religious scriptures, the divine voices, that we have grown up imbibing, have done nothing but inseminate and fortify this hatred towards women and convinced us that they have no rights because they are up to no good and are merely lab rats for our moral experiments and punitive decrees Unfortunately, nothing is going to change that So thank your stars if you re not born a woman and wait for the AI to rise.The greatest invention of humankind isn t the wheel or the smartphone The distinction shall be shared by God and Money Religion is the thread that joins the two and thus wield all the power that is needed to control the world Everything else kingdom, slavery, human rights, wars, morals, punishments finds its origin from the Holy Trinity The most advanced economies of the world today are also its pallbearers During those memorable vacations across Europe where we can t help but marvel over the rich cultural heritage, we fail to see the blood and hear the screeches of those unknown people whose lives meant nothingthan a bionic tool These great cultures owe the world for all their glory and all the pain inflicted by them.The book talks about French Revolution, too It struck me that for all the renowned perfumes that France makes, its history reeks of hypocrisy The Spanish and the British well they re also a monumental story.Now, our school education I remember those History lessons I had during school What are we taught Whose point of view is it I feel bad for Queen Mary Antoinette and feel bad for myself for not looking beyond my textbooks and not having anyone to ask other than my school teachers.Target readers Neither everyone can nor everyone should read this book It is a book that requires responsible reading It has the power to offend many people and honestly, we already have enough of those kind sauntering around spewing venom See for yourself If you have even a slightly misplaced sense of pride in your nation, race, religion, caste, beliefs, culture, education or inheritance, you either prepare yourself to bear the jolt or choose the normal path and stay away from it If you happen to read it and love it like I did, recommend it to someone willing to traverse uncharted territories.Update The Guru s words on the book All happy families are alike Each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way Throughout our lives we have read about the happy histories of Victors in wars and great rulers and the progress of civilization and the advancement of learning And they all sound similar Galeano s history is of the oppressed, of the dispossessed and the vanquished, and brings out, in sublime prose bristling with outrage and yet restrained, the singular tragedies and indignities experienced by individuals and people through the ages.Mirrors is history in prose poems Mirrors is not history, it is restoration of the truth It is release of memory imprisoned in the museums Mirrors is electric literature at its finest, and with finesse A companion to Neruda s I m explaining a few things come and see the blood in the streets

  6. Tony Tony says:

    History, as stories History, from the beginning, sort of, with a poetic re working of Genesis and ending as the new century enters at stage right, despairing from what s come before History, as examined by a cynic, skeptic, artist, lover, collector, judge History, without all the commercials and talking and stuff History, that is simplistic, selective, apocryphal and occasionally wrong, and necessary for all of that History, that grabs you by the lapels or the scruff of the neck and yells, History, as stories History, from the beginning, sort of, with a poetic re working of Genesis and ending as the new century enters at stage right, despairing from what s come before History, as examined by a cynic, skeptic, artist, lover, collector, judge History, without all the commercials and talking and stuff History, that is simplistic, selective, apocryphal and occasionally wrong, and necessary for all of that History, that grabs you by the lapels or the scruff of the neck and yells, Look at this and Look at this History, that explains Why They Hate Us History, as feminist history as you will ever read History, as a history of racism History, that will hopefully make you as uncomfortable as it made me, which is what it was meant to do History, the kind that is handed to presidents and then never read History, that reads like this La Coruna, summer of 1936 Bebel Garcia is shot by a firing squad.Bebel plays lefty, thinks lefty.In the soccer stadium he wears the jersey of Depor Outside the stadium he wears the jersey of the Young Socialists.Eleven days after Franco s coup, having just turned twenty one, Bebel stands before the firing squad Just a minute, he commands.And the soldiers, Galacians like him, crazy about soccer like him, obey.Bebel slowly opens his fly, button by button, and facing the firing squad he takes a long piss.Then he buttons up Go Ahead

  7. jeremy jeremy says:

    Mirrors are filled with people.The invisible see us.The forgotten recall us.When we see ourselves, we see them.When we turn away, do they Eduardo Galeano, famed Uruguayan journalist and author, has said of himself, I m a writer obsessed with remembering, with remembering the past of America above all and above all that of Latin America, intimate land condemned to amnesia That credo has been ably demonstrated throughout works spanning four decades, including Open Veins of Latin America, the Me Mirrors are filled with people.The invisible see us.The forgotten recall us.When we see ourselves, we see them.When we turn away, do they Eduardo Galeano, famed Uruguayan journalist and author, has said of himself, I m a writer obsessed with remembering, with remembering the past of America above all and above all that of Latin America, intimate land condemned to amnesia That credo has been ably demonstrated throughout works spanning four decades, including Open Veins of Latin America, the Memory of Fire trilogy, and The Book of Embraces In his newest book, Mirrors Stories of Almost Everyone, Galeano continues his poetic illumination of the forgotten, offering his most sweeping, cohesive, and empathetic effort to date.Written in the singular style that has come to characterize all of his previous books, Mirrors is composed of some six hundred beautifully crafted vignettes Galeano, in a dazzling display of literary prowess, recollects five thousand years of human history, from the early civilizations of the ancient Near East through the emergence of the twenty first century Adam and Eve were black The human adventure in the world began in Africa From there, our ancestors set out to conquer the planet Many paths led them to many destinies, and the sun took care of handing out colors from the palette.Now the rainbow of the earth iscolorful than the rainbow of the sky But we are all emigrants from Africa Even the whitest of whites comes from Africa.Maybe we refuse to acknowledge our common origins because racism causes amnesia, or because we find it unbelievable that in those days long past the entire world was our kingdom, an immense map without borders, and our legs were the only passport required. The breadth of material from which these stories were culled is as varied and inexhaustible as history itself, and thus the scope of Mirrors, as well as Galeano s adeptness in presenting the stories as a unified narrative, is nothing short of breathtaking Galeano, as any reader of his works knows well, pays due attention to the silenced, neglected, and disregarded individuals and groups of days past and present History has demonstrated that injustice is rarely accounted for, and evenrarely atoned for, yet Galeano, in his resistance against the fading of memory, reasserts the roles of those long forgotten, allowing them their once denied place in the annals of official history Episodes of the book are devoted to the treatment of women and the misogyny they ve endured for millennia, to slaves and the commodification of their lives, to wars and those left maimed and massacred, to trade and those victimized by imperialism and greed, and to the environment left poisoned and plundered in the pursuit of profit As evidenced by his account of Uruguay s founding document, Galeano is not easily fooled by the whitewashing of history So it was throughout the Americas, from north to south All our countries were born of a lie Independence disowned those who had risked their lives fighting for her, and women, poor people, Indians, and blacks were not invited to the party The constitutions draped that travesty in the prestige of legality.The range of subjects upon which Galeano s pen alights is extraordinary Mirrors considers many of the world s richest cultures the Mexicans, Egyptians, Hebrews, Hindus, Chinese, Romans, Greeks, s , some of the world s most important religious figures Zeus, Osiris, Isis, Odin, Buddha, Mohammed, Jesus , handfuls of the world s greatest artists, musicians, and writers Sappho, Antonio Vivaldi, Vermeer van Delft, Murasaki Shikibu, Abu Ali al Ma arri, Giuseppe Arcimboldo, Ludwig von Beethoven, Fernando Pessoa, Miguel de Cervantes, Omar Khayyam, Billie Holiday, Oscar Wilde, Hieronymus Bosch, Walt Whitman , history s most renowned thinkers and leaders Thomas Edison, Emiliano Zapata, Charles Darwin, Nicolaus Copernicus, Evo Morales, Thomas Jefferson, Joseph Stalin, Harriet Tubman, Galileo Galilei, Aristotle , and scores of other individuals whose lives and accomplishments have been misappropriated, misapplied, or misunderstood Historical events that have shaped the lives of peoples and nations are not immune from Galeano s gaze, and even some of the most well known of these events are infused with his tenacious veracity, providing the reader with a different perspective from which to reconsider their relevance and import Darwin told us we are cousins of the apes, not the angels Later on, we learned we emerged from Africa s jungle and that no stork ever carried us from Paris And not long ago we discovered that our genes are almost identical to those of mice.Now we can t tell if we are God s masterpiece or the devil s bad joke We puny humans exterminators of everything,hunters of our own,creators of the atom bomb, the hydrogen bomb, and the neutron bomb, which is the healthiest of all bombs since it vaporizes people and leaves objects intact,we, the only animals who invent machines,the only ones who live at the service of the machines they invent,the only ones who devour their own home,the only ones who poison the water they drink and the earth that feeds them,the only ones capable of renting or selling themselves, or renting and selling their fellow humans,the only ones who kill for fun,the only ones who torture,the only ones who rape.And alsothe only ones who laugh,the only ones who daydream,the ones who makes silk from the spit of a worm,the ones who find beauty in rubbish,the ones who discover colors beyond the rainbow,the ones who furnish the voices of the world with new music,and who create words so thatneither reality nor memory will be mute.While Galeano s fidelity to memory, justice, and truth are indeed remarkable it is the grace, humor, and compassion with which he writes that set his works far beyond the realm of his contemporaries Mirrors is a powerfully evocative book, one that is sure to anger those with vested interests in fictitious realities Galeano does not profess to speak for the voiceless, yet his works amplify the muted calls for dignity and justness that have resounded for many thousands of years from the mouths of the silenced Although no mess of paper and ink can halt the onslaught of war, brutality, and inhumanity that is much of mankind s legacy, Mirrors, above all else, assures us that we cannot absolve ourselves of our responsibility to others by drifting aimlessly onward amidst the deluded comforts of collective amnesia The book s subtitle, Stories of Almost Everyone, is perhaps an invitation to author the chapters still to be written, an invocation to eschew passivity and wrest control from those who have, through conquest of one kind or another, been masters of a story that had no other characters but themselves The twentieth century, which was born proclaiming peace and justice, died bathed in blood It passed on a world muchunjust than the one it inherited.The twenty first century, which also arrived heralding peace and justice, is following in its predecessor s footsteps.In my childhood, I was convinced that everything that went astray on earth ended up on the moon.But the astronauts found no sign of dangerous dreams or broken promises or hopes betrayed.If not on the moon, where might they be Perhaps they were never misplaced.Perhaps they are in hiding here on earth Waiting.

  8. Shuhan Rizwan Shuhan Rizwan says:

    Outclassed.

  9. AJ Conroy AJ Conroy says:

    NPR Recommendation Imagine Howard Zinn s A People s History of the United States, but penned by a poet and expanded to include the history of the entire world Framed in inventively organized tiny vignettes most just a paragraph or two long Eduardo Galeano s Mirrors explodes our ideas of history in both content and form Fiercely political and fiercely human, Mirrors is a feast for the browser, armchair historian, poet and activist Galeano rewrites the histories of the forgotten and the un NPR Recommendation Imagine Howard Zinn s A People s History of the United States, but penned by a poet and expanded to include the history of the entire world Framed in inventively organized tiny vignettes most just a paragraph or two long Eduardo Galeano s Mirrors explodes our ideas of history in both content and form Fiercely political and fiercely human, Mirrors is a feast for the browser, armchair historian, poet and activist Galeano rewrites the histories of the forgotten and the unsung, holding the guilty accountable in lyrical, inspired and unapologetically passionate prose The table of contents alone is satisfying, with listings like Adventures of the mind in dark times, Wigs, The despicable human hand, Forbidden to be a woman, Jazz, Lenin, Mark Twain and Django Reinhardt A sumptuously written and bravely constructed mosaic of history, this book dares the reader to reflect, respond and speak out at every turn

  10. Sara Salem Sara Salem says:

    One of the most poetic books I have ever read He goes back to narrate history through the eyes of the marginalized, with short beautifully written stories.

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