A Misteriosa Chama da Rainha Loana MOBI Ü A



10 thoughts on “A Misteriosa Chama da Rainha Loana

  1. Leore Joanne Green Leore Joanne Green says:

    I expected a lot from this book when I bought it, and I have to say that I was quite dissappointed I liked the lead character a lot, and the offset for the plot was excellent, but it seemed to me that he Eco didn t play around enough with all the possibilities which his character s situation allowed.At Solara, the idea of trying to recover his history by surrounding himself with his childhood things was very appealing to me, but at some point I got sick of rummaging through old vinyl discs and I expected a lot from this book when I bought it, and I have to say that I was quite dissappointed I liked the lead character a lot, and the offset for the plot was excellent, but it seemed to me that he Eco didn t play around enough with all the possibilities which his character s situation allowed.At Solara, the idea of trying to recover his history by surrounding himself with his childhood things was very appealing to me, but at some point I got sick of rummaging through old vinyl discs and stamp collections with him I enjoyed the stories about the books, but these too grew old after a while Though it was interesting to learn about Facist Italy from the perspective of a boy spoiler I liked the twist since it s not really a twist , when he found the old book, had a stroke and started floating amongst his memories again.It was very satisfying to finally understand who he is, and where he comes from But what wasn t satisfying was the ending The idea of all the characters from the comics and books which inhabited his life to come to him in his final moments is charming, but it also left me with a sour taste in my mouth, since the author left all the ends rather loose I still would like to know what happened with the book he found.Highlights Gragnola I think that was his name and his long speech about why god is a facist sent me hollering.Also, Yambo s musing about whether he s dreaming, or dreaming of dreaming, or perhaps just existing in a sort of suspended state, as just a brain floating in fluid into whom someone sends images as he wishes Reminded me of the Matrix.So to sum it up I wasn t too thrilled by this book, though it had its moments.Quote By war s end I had learned a great deal, not only how babies are born, but also hoe jews die.7.5.07


  2. April April says:

    I read every 449 pages of this book and feel like I wasted a lot of time This book needs SO MUCH editing The premise and some of the ideas presented had great potential for a very interesting story, however it fails in almost every way There is no characterization, the story barely moves from page 1 to page 449, and there are many story lines which are left unfinished 90% of the book is tedious description of dated material such as books, records, photographs, etc which are suppose to ev I read every 449 pages of this book and feel like I wasted a lot of time This book needs SO MUCH editing The premise and some of the ideas presented had great potential for a very interesting story, however it fails in almost every way There is no characterization, the story barely moves from page 1 to page 449, and there are many story lines which are left unfinished 90% of the book is tedious description of dated material such as books, records, photographs, etc which are suppose to evoke certain memories for the main character but the writing is factually descriptive to the point there is no room for sentimentality or connection for the reader I also had a hard time believing the main character would be intellectually limited to his ideas of how his personality was spawned by these random objects he found in his childhood home In part 3 which I am sure a lot of readers don t even make it to there is actually a section which would have made a terrific short story on it s own Sadly, it doesn t make up for the rest of the book Additionally my copy of the book was poorly laid out, the corresponding photos drawings were placed too far ahead or too far back from the writing To place an image and have to flip back to see it once it becomes clear what it refers to makes no sense


  3. Lavina Lavina says:

    I was about 150 pages into the book when I started feeling the way you feel when you re looking through stacks of photo albums with someone you don t really know, who s telling you very detailed stories about people you ve never met and places you ve never been people and places to whom you have no connection.In the end, the concept of the book which is what drew me to it in the first place was what made it weak People are interesting because of their experiences, their memories of them, t I was about 150 pages into the book when I started feeling the way you feel when you re looking through stacks of photo albums with someone you don t really know, who s telling you very detailed stories about people you ve never met and places you ve never been people and places to whom you have no connection.In the end, the concept of the book which is what drew me to it in the first place was what made it weak People are interesting because of their experiences, their memories of them, their stories Yambo, a blank slate at the beginning of the book, has none of these, and 300 pages is a long way to go to get them By the time his character developed enough substance, I was kind of too tired to care Still, the book was better than just ok Though I couldn t relate, it was incredibly well crafted and clever and probably not the Eco I should have started with I change my mind It really was just ok, if even that


  4. Sara Sara says:

    The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana tells of an antiquarian book dealer who has suffered a stroke and lost all memory of the people in and events of his life At the novel s outset, the protagonist, Yambo, begins the daunting work of trying to reinsert himself into the life he has forgotten He finds that he does not recognize his family or closest friends, but can still appraise a 17th century work of natural history His only sparks of memory relate to books he has read These come back to him The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana tells of an antiquarian book dealer who has suffered a stroke and lost all memory of the people in and events of his life At the novel s outset, the protagonist, Yambo, begins the daunting work of trying to reinsert himself into the life he has forgotten He finds that he does not recognize his family or closest friends, but can still appraise a 17th century work of natural history His only sparks of memory relate to books he has read These come back to him in snippets Names, quotations, plotlines Yambo laments to his wife that his memory is made of paper In an attempt to reconnect with any memories of real people or actual events, he takes a solitary trip back to his childhood home in a rustic town called Solara At Solara, Yambo findsbooks.The majority of The Mysterious Flame describes these books and how, poring over them at 60, Yambo imagines what he must have taken from them as a child This central portion of The Mysterious Flame, the meat of the novel, is filled with images from the books, magazines and comics Yambo finds, which is a wonderful boon to Eco s readers in following Yambo s mental journey Performing this task of self rediscovery, Yambo concocts an elaborate method of reference and cross reference to try and reclaim memories of himself at 7, at 10, at 13 For example, as he reads a comic book from his 6th grade year, he plays music that would have been current, looks at newspapers from the period to give himself context of world events at that time, tracks down his school notebooks to retrieve what he may have thought when he read this book or that TheYambo reads, however, the farther his pre stroke memory retreats With every book he encounters, he creates a new memory of himself as a child interpreted by himself as an old man, but without actually remembering that childhood as he lived it Is knowing what he read as a child enough to infer who he was or who he became Yambo s struggles to connect ink on pages to the living boy he once was accentuate the edifice of memory and the extent to which we interpret and meticulously craft even a genuine memory As we follow Yambo s efforts, Eco invites us to consider the connection between what we read, what we think and who we are, between lived experience and read experience, between knowledge gleaned in the world and knowledge gleaned through the written word It brings to my mind a pet metaphor of medieval monks, which compares reading to eating To read is to consume a whole, digest it, and to absorb its nutrients If you are what you eat, as they say, then to the medieval scholar you are, literally, what you read What one reads becomes one s identity insofar as it crafts one s thoughts and helps determine one s actions This view of identity as thought does not conform neatly with current fixations on identity as deed, but as with so much from the Middle Ages, I think we benefit from entertaining such ideas and I was tickled, if not surprised, to discover them floating around in a work by Eco, a consummate medievalist by temperament if not by trade.I will not here reveal the final issue of Yambo s labors because whether or not he recovers his memory constitutes the point of tension upon which the plot relies for its momentum I had intended to address my single criticism of this novel, but it seems wiser now to glance over it if not swallow it completely It pertains to Yambo s adolescent view of women, and one woman in particular, a view I found discordant with the otherwise rather acute emotional as well as academic intelligence of the character Would a man so obsessed with the mind really carry a lifelong torch for a boyhood crush based solely on appearance But none of us is consistent, so perhaps this is no criticism at all, and merely an observation of what I found unlikable about Eco s protagonist When I remember reading this book and what I took from it, this will probably be a detail I will selectively omit, crafting my memory willfully, so that I recall only my enjoyment of the book, which was considerable


  5. Nandakishore Varma Nandakishore Varma says:

    Umberto Eco is a novelist of ideas His The Name of the Rose, even though a thrilling mystery story, was actually a primer on medieval Christianity and monastery life.


  6. Kate Kate says:

    This book really disappointed in the end, after giving a fairly fascinating glimpse of the culture of an Italian childhood under Fascism I was enjoying the plot and then suddenly it ends in this inexplicable way, as if Eco suddenly got horribly sick of writing the thing I m keeping it for the gorgeous color reproductions.


  7. Rick Davis Rick Davis says:

    This was not as engrossing as The Name of the Rose and not as complex as Foucault s Pendulum, but The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana hit me harder and at apersonal level than Eco s other books The theme is nostalgia and personal identity Through Yambo s amnesia, Eco explores the way in which we construct our identities through scraps from our past what books we ve read, movies we ve seen, music we ve heard, experiences we ve had It also shows that what we choose to forget and how we c This was not as engrossing as The Name of the Rose and not as complex as Foucault s Pendulum, but The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana hit me harder and at apersonal level than Eco s other books The theme is nostalgia and personal identity Through Yambo s amnesia, Eco explores the way in which we construct our identities through scraps from our past what books we ve read, movies we ve seen, music we ve heard, experiences we ve had It also shows that what we choose to forget and how we choose to tell our own stories are just as important as what we remember and the objective facts of our lives The honesty with which Eco traces Yambo s childhood will strike every reader close to home Yambo s experiences are his own, but they will also call to mind the childhood and adolescent experiences of any reader I found myself spending a lot of time in my own past while reading this book and thinking about my own personal story.The final third of the book is a tour de force, a secular, pop culture Divine Comedy that is spectacular and mind bending I wouldn t recommend this as your first Eco book, but if you re a fan of his other works, The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana is not to be missed


  8. Guy Guy says:

    The beauty and richness of Eco s language is as good as it gets in this book Every sentence was a work of verbal art The language sang, to me I was awed by its power Truly a great novel.Example This man, a failure since birth, not only reads, he also writes I could write, too, could add my own monsters to those that scuttle with their ragged claws across the silent sea floors That man ruins his eyes over pages on which he sets down his obsessions in muddy ink from inkwells whose bottoms ar The beauty and richness of Eco s language is as good as it gets in this book Every sentence was a work of verbal art The language sang, to me I was awed by its power Truly a great novel.Example This man, a failure since birth, not only reads, he also writes I could write, too, could add my own monsters to those that scuttle with their ragged claws across the silent sea floors That man ruins his eyes over pages on which he sets down his obsessions in muddy ink from inkwells whose bottoms are thick with sludge, like Turkish coffee He ruined them as a boy, reading by candlelight he ruined them in the penumbra of libraries, his eyelids reddening He writes with the help of strong lenses, dogged by fears of going blind If not blind, then paralytic his nerves are shot, he has pains and numbness in one leg, his fingers twitching involuntarily, his head shakes badly He writes with his thick glasses nearly touching the page.P399


  9. Kurt Reichenbaugh Kurt Reichenbaugh says:

    I m really lukewarm on this novel I bought it when it first came out in paperback here in the U.S and then put it up on the shelf next to The Brotherhood of the Rose and let it sit there like a bottle of wine until last week I admired all of the colorful illustrations in it, but the synopsis of the story itself didn t really grab me Anyway, long weekends of staying inside prompted me to pull it down from the shelf and uncork it Much of it is pretty good, from the point of view of a middle a I m really lukewarm on this novel I bought it when it first came out in paperback here in the U.S and then put it up on the shelf next to The Brotherhood of the Rose and let it sit there like a bottle of wine until last week I admired all of the colorful illustrations in it, but the synopsis of the story itself didn t really grab me Anyway, long weekends of staying inside prompted me to pull it down from the shelf and uncork it Much of it is pretty good, from the point of view of a middle aged guy myself The big difference being that I myself did not spend my formative years under a fascist dictatorship But I could relate to the pursuit of one s past through the books of one s childhood For most guys my age in the U.S that could be The Hardy Boys, Doc Savage, GI Joe, Wacky Packages, Batman, boy scouts, school primers and capitalist propaganda For our protagonist, it wasn t much different Comic books, heroes like Flash Gordon, records, radio, anthems and fascist propaganda But then much of the novel is like looking at someone else s scrapbooks You see what was meaningful to them, yet you re still distant from really knowing them Maybe that s the point Then there is the all consuming, unconsummated first great love in our past The one you admired from nearby, the one who made your reel with vertigo if you got too close to her or him in school We chase after her in all the subsequent relationships of our lives She s always there, faceless in the fog of adolescent memory This book is about her as well But I don t imagine anyone besides me wants to know about that girl So, you read this book, admire the pictures, and think about your first crush and then move on Still, I did kind of like it


  10. Steven Z. Steven Z. says:

    For the longest time I have wanted to tackle one of Umberto Eco s novels I knew they were unique so I have digested his fifth work, THE MYSTERIOUS FLAME OF QUEEN LOANA To say the least the book was different from anything I have ever read Eco introduces the main character a Giambattista Bodoni, with Yambo as a nickname suffering from memory loss due to a heart attack He lives in Milan and is fifty nine years of age and he is crushed by the fact that he can remember things from the distant pa For the longest time I have wanted to tackle one of Umberto Eco s novels I knew they were unique so I have digested his fifth work, THE MYSTERIOUS FLAME OF QUEEN LOANA To say the least the book was different from anything I have ever read Eco introduces the main character a Giambattista Bodoni, with Yambo as a nickname suffering from memory loss due to a heart attack He lives in Milan and is fifty nine years of age and he is crushed by the fact that he can remember things from the distant past, but nothingrecent He does not even know his name and it takes his wife Paola, who is a psychologist, and his physician, Dr Gratarolo to introduce him to his identity and certain pathways of his life For Yambo familiarizing himself or relearning almost everything was similar to being Adam or Eve.Eco offers numerous ruminations on memory its depth, how difficult it is at times to retrieve its contents, and how hard it is to move forward without the knowledge that is buried within For Yambo his memory is nothing but frustration The brain is an amazing instrument as he can remember four stanzas of Dante s poetry, but can t remember if he ever had an affair with Sibilla who is his assistant at his antiquarian bookstore Yambo s heart attack has erased all memory of his own life while leaving every scrap of every book, comic strip, song, movie that he has ever experienced intact The most interesting part of the novel is the first part as he confronts his medical issue and tries to recapture his memory Eco incorporates sarcasm, and humor to relieve some Yambo s tension, but his stress is evident The solution that is reached is that Yambo should visit his grandfather s retreat at Solaro where he spent much of his childhood Since his grandfather was also a bookseller it is hoped that what is stored in the main house will stimulate Yambo and restore his memory.In examining the attic of his childhood Yambo feels like he is an intruder in a forbidden kingdom He travels from one section of the attic to another, and one crate or bookshelf to another trying to locate clues of his previous life In doing so we witness a man rummaging through the attic and study in a Piedmontese country house in search of his past Yambo reads for the first time, or rereads countless books from his past, many of which he recognizes along with listening to numerous records He comes across Sherlock Holmes, Flash Gordon, Jules Verne, among many titles by Italian authors Eco provides numerous illustrations to highlight Yambo s findings Included are tins, cigarette cases, toys, calendars, dolls, soldiers, record cases, stamps, and of course numerous book jackets from his grandfather s library For Yambo the mystery of Solara was that at every turn he would approach a revelation, and it would come to stop on the edge of a cliff, the invisible chasm that kept him in a fog.The book itself is not really a novel, butof a revisiting of Eco s past reading life The book s illustrations are interesting, but not really necessary, perhaps they were thrown in to embellish the story The strong suit are a series of what appear to be essays on such diverse topics as Mussolini s influence on children s literature, his schoolboy notebooks depicting the exploits of Il Duce, Black Shirts, and colonial triumphs, then listening to a radio as the war turns to songs of bravery and coming defeat at Anzio, the landing at Sicily, bombing of Milan, all of life s reality as the family had left the city to wait out the war in Solara Yambo would learn a great deal about his grandfather s past in Solara as he searched for his own Particularly important were the reasons his grandfather turned from journalism to buying an old book shop.The most important episode of Yambo s adolescence turned out to be a teenage crush on a girl named Lila Saba She would become an obsession for Yambo even after her family moved to Brazil He would grill his friend Gianni who knew her also as he continued his quest to remember her face well into adulthood, to the point when he learned her real name was not Lila, but Sibillia.In summation, Eco has presented a popular history of the 1930s and 1940s through his meandering approach to recapturing his childhood In doing so Yambo provides a narrative of World War II and its effect on Italy through the eyes of a boy For Yambo he becomes caught between listening to the messages of national glory and daydreaming about the fog in thinking about London and Sherlock Holmes In the end he would realize that he had rediscovered things that he and countless others had read, and aside from stories about his grandfather he had not relived his childhood, but he had relived the life of a generation.Eco s effort does not flow evenly One page is a narrative about family and life Another deals with the war The next might deal with the temptations that religion does not permit Moving on you are following Yambo s reading history, then his opinion of film, stamps, and what not Then on to developing his sexuality and his obsession with Lila At times fascinating, at time engrossing, but also at times fantasy that can lose the reader s attention Eco s humor, sarcasm, and didactic knowledge reflect a fascinating author, but be prepared to concentrate fully because if you do not, you will get lost


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A Misteriosa Chama da Rainha Loana ✽ [EPUB] ✵ A Misteriosa Chama da Rainha Loana By Umberto Eco ❧ – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Yambo, um abastado alfarrabista de Mil o na casa dos sessenta, perdeu a mem ria ap s um AVC lembra se do enredo de cada livro que leu, de cada linha de poesia, mas n o se lembra do pr prio nome, n o r Yambo, um Chama da MOBI ☆ abastado alfarrabista de Mil o na casa dos sessenta, perdeu a mem ria ap s um AVC lembra se do enredo de cada livro que leu, de cada linha de poesia, mas n o se lembra do pr prio nome, n o reconhece as pr prias filhas ou qualquer momento da sua inf ncia ou da sua fam lia Numa tentativa de recupera o de si pr prio, Yambo aceita a sugest o A Misteriosa Epub / da mulher de voltar casa de campo da sua inf ncia, onde descobre livros, lbuns de banda desenhada, revistas, discos de outros tempos, religiosamente guardados pelo av j falecido, e come a uma viagem em busca do tempo perdido, povoado de imagens e personagens ora fict cios, ora reais, mas todos importantes para a redescoberta de si pr prio Assim, Yambo acaba por reviver a hist ria da sua vida de Mussolini educa o cat lica, Misteriosa Chama da PDF Ë de Josephine Baker a Flash Gordon ou Fred Astaire As suas mem rias v o surgindo ininterruptamente, e a sua pr pria vida vai surgindo diante dos seus olhos como uma banda desenhada Nesta luta para recuperar a mem ria, Yambo s procura uma nica e simples imagem a imagem do seu primeiro amor.