A Killing Kindness PDF/EPUB õ A Killing MOBI :Ê


A Killing Kindness ❰KINDLE❯ ❄ A Killing Kindness Author Reginald Hill – Natus-physiotherapy.co.uk Andy Dalziel knows how to cope with crime Give him a nice straightforward murder, some bloke with a gun and a grievance, and he s a happy man But this new one, that the press is calling the Yorkshire Andy Dalziel knows how to cope with crime Give him a nice straightforward A Killing MOBI :Ê murder, some bloke with a gun and a grievance, and he s a happy man But this new one, that the press is calling the Yorkshire Choker well, Andy could suggest some different names, none of them fit for a family paper It s not just that he keeps phoning the cops to boast about the girls he s strangled No, this one apparently thinks he s Hamlet, Prince of Denmark And further, the sergeant has called in a clairvoyant, as though Andy needs some nutjob with a crystal ball to help him crack the case.

    A Killing Kindness PDF/EPUB õ A Killing MOBI :Ê Andy could suggest some different names, none of them fit for a family paper It s not just that he keeps phoning the cops to boast about the girls he s strangled No, this one apparently thinks he s Hamlet, Prince of Denmark And further, the sergeant has called in a clairvoyant, as though Andy needs some nutjob with a crystal ball to help him crack the case."/>
  • Paperback
  • 277 pages
  • A Killing Kindness
  • Reginald Hill
  • English
  • 10 April 2017
  • 1934609382

About the Author: Reginald Hill

Reginald Charles Hill is a contemporary English crime writer, and the winner in A Killing MOBI :Ê of the Crime Writers Association Cartier Diamond Dagger for Lifetime AchievementAfter National Service and studying English at St Catherine s College, Oxford University he worked as a teacher for many years, rising to Senior Lecturer at Doncaster College of Education In he retired from salaried work in order to devote himself full time to writingHill is best known for histhan novels featuring the Yorkshire detectives Andrew Dalziel, Peter Pascoe and Edgar Wield He has also writtenthan other novels, including five featuring Joe Sixsmith, a black machine operator turned private detective in a fictional Luton Novels originally published under the pseudonyms of Patrick Ruell, Dick Morland, and Charles Underhill have now appeared under his own name Hill is also a writer of short stories, and ghost tales.



10 thoughts on “A Killing Kindness

  1. Leah Leah says:

    To thine own self be trueWhen Sergeant Wield visits the mother of murder victim Brenda Sorby, he finds that Mrs Sorby has called in gypsy clairvoyant Rosetta Stanhope to try to contact her dead daughter Politely, Wield listens in, but when the local press get hold of the story it is blown up as the police having called in a psychic because they re baffled, and Superintendent Dalziel is not pleased The press have a point, though Brenda is the third apparent victim of the murderer the press To thine own self be trueWhen Sergeant Wield visits the mother of murder victim Brenda Sorby, he finds that Mrs Sorby has called in gypsy clairvoyant Rosetta Stanhope to try to contact her dead daughter Politely, Wield listens in, but when the local press get hold of the story it is blown up as the police having called in a psychic because they re baffled, and Superintendent Dalziel is not pleased The press have a point, though Brenda is the third apparent victim of the murderer the press have dubbed the Choker and the police are indeed baffled There seems no obvious connection between the victims, and while the first two were carefully laid out by the murderer, poor Brenda was found dumped in the local canal However, all three women were strangled, and after each murder the local paper received an anonymous phonecall quoting a line from Hamlet Then, as Dalziel, Pascoe and Wield search for leads, a fourth murder takes placeThe thing I love about this series is how it evolves over time, both in terms of the recurring characters, and in the quality of the plotting This one dates from 1980, a full decade after the first book and a decade that saw the beginning of lots of changes in social attitudes Hill could have simply changed the characters of his two leads as many writers tried to do with varying degrees of success But instead he allows them to grow and adapt At this point, Dalziel remains the rude, boorish, foul mouthed dinosaur, but Pascoe, now married to the feminist Ellie, has matured into a semi decent bloke, who might still expect his dinner to be on the table when he gets home but isn t too put out when it s left for him in the oven instead, while Ellie is off out with her feminist friends For the early 80s, this almost counted as being a New Man Even Dalziel will gradually reveal that most of his boorishness is an act and that he might be evenadvanced than Pascoe in his heart Dalziel doesn t care if his officers are male or female, gay or straight, white or black he s equally rude and offensive to them all, but they can count on his total support should anyone else try to mess with them.Having brought Ellie in a few books earlier to counterbalance the sexism and boost the feminist angle, in this one Hill brings Wieldy to the fore I can t say definitively that Wield is the first sympathetic depiction of a gay policeman in mainstream British crime fiction, but he s certainly the first I came across and it was pretty astounding at the time Especially since the portrayal of him is so good not in any way stereotyped, not suggesting that being gay makes him weak or feminine or perverted or any of the other negative characteristics that fictional gay people were so often given at that period Wield is a normal guy who happens to be gay For younger people used to that kind of portrayal of gay people, it s hard to explain how revolutionary it seemed back in the day And the joy is that Wieldy is so easy to like Again, I have no evidence that Wield changed perceptions of homosexuality in Hill s readership but I d be amazed if he didn t He s one example of the way Hill constantly pushed at the boundaries, but subtly and with warmth and humour, rather than beating the reader over the head with polemics and messages.The plot in this one is excellent probably the first in the series where I felt Hill got it completely right It s complex and convincing, and dark While it involves the murder of young women, it avoids the salaciousness and voyeurism that often accompanies that, and the killer s motivation is original I m desperately trying to avoid anything which could be a spoiler, so I ll simply say that the motivation aspect gives the book the psychological depth that became a trademark of Hill s work as the series developed That s what makes Dalziel and Pascoe such a good team Dalziel knows how to bully evidence out of the unwilling, but Pascoe knows how to use empathy and understanding to tease out the reason for the crimes.When I first read this series, it was around this book that I first joined in and I must say I d recommend it as a good starting point to people coming to the series fresh While all the books are readable, there s no doubt the very early ones feel a little dated now, and not as polished, whereas this one stands up very well to modern eyes, I think I found that I wasforgiving of the sexism in the earlier ones when I backtracked to them after learning to love the characters once they had becomedeveloped, and from this point on the series just gets better and better There are twenty four of them in total, so if you haven t already read them, you really ought to make a start soon they get my highest recommendation www.fictionfanblog.wordpress.com

  2. Wendy Wendy says:

    This is quite possibly the best of the Dalziel and Pascoe novels that I ve read so far It s a very well paced police procedural with enough twists and turns to keep you hooked until the very end If you haven t tried this series before, this book would be a good place to start it s an excellent example of most of the things the series does right One thing that particularly impressed me about this book is how it deals with a lot of difficult subject matter There is a serial killer who is murd This is quite possibly the best of the Dalziel and Pascoe novels that I ve read so far It s a very well paced police procedural with enough twists and turns to keep you hooked until the very end If you haven t tried this series before, this book would be a good place to start it s an excellent example of most of the things the series does right One thing that particularly impressed me about this book is how it deals with a lot of difficult subject matter There is a serial killer who is murdering young women there is a nearby encampment of Romany, some of whom fall under suspicion for the crime there s the return of the radical feminist group we first met in A Pinch of Snuff and there are some moments when the police resort to some decidedly dodgy tactics to get their evidence The opportunities for the author to do something cringeworthy in relation to ethnicity or gender are numerous, as are the moments where I might expect another author to deliver a crude political rant Hill evades these pitfalls His characters, although they can be pretty extreme, never seem like stereotypes to me The world Hill depicts can be pretty ugly, but you never feel like he s stacking the deck to make a point

  3. Amanda Wells Amanda Wells says:

    My typical objection to these books is the prejudice shown by the main characters in terms of heavy sexism usually This time I was excited to see an unexpected bit of progress in the form of gay sergeant Wield, who s perspective we are shown and who s life is pretty normal unusual for the time in a mainstream book from the limited books I ve read produced in this era.Alas the slurs thrown at the Romany people cancel out any sense of progress overall So if you re looking to read this bo My typical objection to these books is the prejudice shown by the main characters in terms of heavy sexism usually This time I was excited to see an unexpected bit of progress in the form of gay sergeant Wield, who s perspective we are shown and who s life is pretty normal unusual for the time in a mainstream book from the limited books I ve read produced in this era.Alas the slurs thrown at the Romany people cancel out any sense of progress overall So if you re looking to read this book, and get mad about the assumptions and prejudices towards travellers and the like, perhaps give it a miss That aside I seem to say that alot in reviews of detective fiction written pre 2000 the plot was engaging and I hadn t figured it out ahead of when it all came together Adding the new perspective of Sgt Wield was great view spoiler although it had me worried he was going to be bumped off he wasn t hide spoiler and I m hoping we getof him in the next few Dalziel was a little harder to get my head around this time though, so perhaps we ll getof his insights in the next book

  4. Alison C Alison C says:

    There appears to be a new serial killer in Yorkshire as A Killing Kindness begins, as first one, then another, and another, woman is found strangled to death The deaths seem to be ritualistic, until the fourth one occurs which is different from all the others And there seem to be mysterious phone calls, quoting Shakespeare, that are related to the deaths as well Superintendent Dalziel is furious when one of his Sergeants apparently calls in a gypsy clairvoyant, but there may be no other way There appears to be a new serial killer in Yorkshire as A Killing Kindness begins, as first one, then another, and another, woman is found strangled to death The deaths seem to be ritualistic, until the fourth one occurs which is different from all the others And there seem to be mysterious phone calls, quoting Shakespeare, that are related to the deaths as well Superintendent Dalziel is furious when one of his Sergeants apparently calls in a gypsy clairvoyant, but there may be no other way to solve the case before there are stilldeaths A Killing Kindness is the sixth Dalziel and Pascoe novel, published in 1980, and like the previous novels in this series, there s a serious problem with the casual sexism that is a constant in the story But if one can get past that difficulty, the story itself is intriguing, and of course the main characters are all interesting, particularly as the regulars intermingle and change in their relationships The ending was wholly unsatisfying, though, so only a mild recommendation from me

  5. Pamela Mclaren Pamela Mclaren says:

    Andy Dalziel and Peter Pascoe are onto another series of murders It starts with a middle aged woman found strangled and laid out with her hands crossed over her chest Soon others follow, young women, calls for the police to stop the Yorkshire Choker and phone calls from someone or someones to the local newspaper that quote Hamlet What is the connection to all of them and why the quotes Dalziel and Pascoe may not always get along, but they can solve a mystery.A very good read, full of color Andy Dalziel and Peter Pascoe are onto another series of murders It starts with a middle aged woman found strangled and laid out with her hands crossed over her chest Soon others follow, young women, calls for the police to stop the Yorkshire Choker and phone calls from someone or someones to the local newspaper that quote Hamlet What is the connection to all of them and why the quotes Dalziel and Pascoe may not always get along, but they can solve a mystery.A very good read, full of color and twist and turns, as well as a wonderful introduction of a new character that I hope to see continue Sgt Wield, a gay policeman who manages to play his cards really well in interviews A good foil to both of the main characters and in this book he is one of the pivotal characters in hunting down clues and helping solve the case

  6. Phil Benson Phil Benson says:

    Thirty years on A Killing Kindness still reads well and Colin Buchanan does a great job on bringing the audiobook to life The book must have been ahead of its time in the early 1980s and it shows in the rather improbable sequence of serial killings and the quaint police psychologist or trick cyclist as Dalziel inevitably calls him , not to mention the gay police sergeant and feminist solicitor But Reginald Hill s books are always a bit off to the side of mainstream crime writing and that s Thirty years on A Killing Kindness still reads well and Colin Buchanan does a great job on bringing the audiobook to life The book must have been ahead of its time in the early 1980s and it shows in the rather improbable sequence of serial killings and the quaint police psychologist or trick cyclist as Dalziel inevitably calls him , not to mention the gay police sergeant and feminist solicitor But Reginald Hill s books are always a bit off to the side of mainstream crime writing and that s part of their charm Who else would name a suspect Wildgoose

  7. cloudyskye cloudyskye says:

    Fair to middling Don t want to spoil this, but the villain s identity reminds me a lot of the one in book 23.The book was first published in 1981, so that world is convincingly drawn Not much in the way of computers, mobile or smartphones and DNA and stuff How on earth did they solve crimes Little grey cells and footwork all the way 7 Dalziel Pascoes read, 17 to go Fair to middling Don t want to spoil this, but the villain s identity reminds me a lot of the one in book 23.The book was first published in 1981, so that world is convincingly drawn Not much in the way of computers, mobile or smartphones and DNA and stuff How on earth did they solve crimes Little grey cells and footwork all the way 7 Dalziel Pascoes read, 17 to go

  8. Barbara Barbara says:

    I m familiar with these books because of the UK TV series, so I decided to give it a try I won t be returning The main characters aren t particularly likable, and the who in whodunit is telegraphed fairly early, always a turnoff for me Well, at least I know now.

  9. Maria Thermann Maria Thermann says:

    Reginald Hill is my favourite crime writer, as masterly a storyteller and plotter as one could wish for, and an expert in characterisation, sketching his protagonists with a few well chosen words, where other writers would waste whole pages.The intricate plot of this Dalziel and Pascoe investigation shows us not only Sergeant Wield in a different,human light It gives the reader greater insight into the Pascoe marriage, where Ellie Pascoe is expecting their first child Essentially, this i Reginald Hill is my favourite crime writer, as masterly a storyteller and plotter as one could wish for, and an expert in characterisation, sketching his protagonists with a few well chosen words, where other writers would waste whole pages.The intricate plot of this Dalziel and Pascoe investigation shows us not only Sergeant Wield in a different,human light It gives the reader greater insight into the Pascoe marriage, where Ellie Pascoe is expecting their first child Essentially, this is a story about the vulnerability of women, who in this case are being stalked and murdered by a mysterious serial killer whom the press have dubbed the Yorkshire Choker on account of his strangling his victims Not content with that, he then calls a local newspaper to brag about it with quotations from Shakespeare s Hamlet.Danger s lurking everywhere for WomenNo woman or girl seems safe The killer strikes by day and by night, in deserted areas as well as crowded ones Without an obvious link between the victims, the police struggle to find leads that will help them stop the next murder.Calling in the help of many different experts, including voice analysts from the local college and a clairvoyant, Dalziel is under a lot of pressure to find the Choker before he can strike again However, despite many man hours spent on interviewing potential witnesses, no clue emerges as to the identity of the murderer The story is largely told from Pascoe s perspective, quite possibly because at this point in his life Pascoe feelsattune to the vulnerability of women.When the Legal System fails VictimsThe ending is rather strange for a Reginald Hill novel, unusual in that it is almost supernatural The author plays with the reader s perception of what is paranormal or normal throughout the novel, beginning his tale with a s ance that takes place after three women have already been killed Again, this is an unusual start we don t get the first victim, second victim etc build up as is typical for crime novels.Instead, the reader is hurled straight into an investigation that has been stalling ever since the second victim was found Through this device, the reader gets a good insight into what it must be like for real investigators, when everything seems stacked against them and the press and public are hounding them for results.I found the ending rather a let down at first but then realised this is a let down stage managed by the author Hill wants us to feel the same frustration as the police officers in charge of the case, whooften than not see cases collapse due to lack of hard evidence or savvy lawyers who often quite happy to let villains go, if it helps further their own legal careers.It s an intricate novel, highly critical of the old fashioned attitude a section of male society has towards women Although many of the crusty attitudes men display in this novel are firmly late 1970 s, I have met enough of such chauvinist fossils to relate to the women in this story and to understand the warped way in which the killer s mind works Men, even today, mostly regard women as their property, as chattel belonging to their household, not as individuals with hopes, dreams and aspirations of their own Sadly, there are many real Chokers around, who may not physically kill their wives or girlfriends, but who nonetheless choke the spirit and life force out of women with their put downs, their possessiveness and constant criticising We have met them all, haven t we girls We can only wish each and every one of them will eventually meet with a real Romani chovihani s curse, just like Reginal Hill s Choker does at the end of this thrilling whodunit

  10. Kirsty Darbyshire Kirsty Darbyshire says:

    As far as I can tell the Yorkshire Ripper came into being in 1975 although I d guess that the nickname didn t get invented until a while after that and Peter Sutcliffe wasn t arrested until 1981 This fact is interesting because this book was published in 1980 and concerns the career of the fictional Yorkshire Choker Since the Yorkshire Ripper looms large in my childhood memories of the news he gets equal billing with Ethiopian famines I found there was something rather disturbing about r As far as I can tell the Yorkshire Ripper came into being in 1975 although I d guess that the nickname didn t get invented until a while after that and Peter Sutcliffe wasn t arrested until 1981 This fact is interesting because this book was published in 1980 and concerns the career of the fictional Yorkshire Choker Since the Yorkshire Ripper looms large in my childhood memories of the news he gets equal billing with Ethiopian famines I found there was something rather disturbing about reading a book which must have its origins in that case.I wonder why Hill decided to create a fictional serial killer for his detective duo Whilst the nicknames for the real life and fictional killers instantly demand a comparison I don t think that the killer in the book is particularly modelled on the real life version even given that background details needed in a book like this wouldn t have been available in 1980 I wonder if writing a book about Yorkshire police in 1980 and not having them dealing with a serial killer would have been a stranger thing than the kind of crossover between real life and fiction that I see reading this book twenty years later.There s at least one rather clever device used in this book that I haven t come across in mystery fiction before and the home lives of the detectives fit in neatly with the plot I have some reservations about the actual ending of this book but on the whole I thought it was pretty good and probably my second favourite of the series this far after A Pinch of Snuff. This is book 6 in the Dalziel and Pascoe series

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *